Skip to main content

Full text of "Massachusetts Department of Public Welfare Annual Report, 1940-1941"

See other formats


Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2014 



https://archive.org/details/massachusettsdepOOmass_0 



Massachusetts. Dept. of Public 

Welfare . 
Annual report. 1940. 



MR 

361M3 

S79r 

1940 



TABUS OF CONTENTS 



Part X 

Page 



Advisory Board. *•*••«*.•.*..•••. •••.*.*• 1 

Caansigsioner 1 * Report • *•»•••••««••••*•*••*« 2-4 

Division of Aid ft Belief* • »*.** ...*.. 5 

Report, Division of Aid end Belief* - • 6*13 

Subdivision of Settlements • • 1A 

Audit • •••»•* - 15 

Roraovfils. • *»*••••« ***••• 16 

Supervision of Wayfarer's fc w tpft %nd Cheap Boarding Houses* • • • 17 

Subdivision of Social Service • »»•••*•••*•»••••• 13-2: 

Subdivision of Appeals* • •*«*.** 27-3C 

Bureau of Research 4 Statistics 31-3^ 

Licensed Boarding Somes for Aged Persona* ............ 40-4,' 

Civilian Conservation Corps - ••• 44-4' 

Surplus Commodities Distribution. • •*»•* *.... 46-5C 

Charts 1-f 

Division of Child Guardianship- *• .......* 5I-8C 

State Board of Housing ••••• .......... 81 

Division of Juvenile Training • SI 

Institutions under the Department * • 81*82 

Supervision of Institutions .*.*............... 82 

Tables Z-? 

The County Training Schools • •••**..•••••**••.• S3 
Table I 

Supervision of the Battled Poor Relieved or Supported by 

Cities and Tows* *««••*•.».....••..... 84-8: 
Dependent Kinor Children with Settlement provided for 

Outside Infirmaries. *.*... . 86-87 

Dependent fiinor Children with Settlement provided for 

In Infirmaries «*.... ........ 68 

The Penalty incurred by Certain Cities and Towns for 

y allure to make their Returns of Poor Relief 

during the month of April. 1940. ....**. S9 

F inane ialSfcateaent of the Department for the Fiscal Year 

ending 3ov. 30, 1940 90 

Part II / 

Private Charitable Corporations ................. 91-94 

Abstracts of Reports on Charitable Corporations 95 

Part III 

City and Town Infirmaries and Statistics of Poor Relief 96-97 

Inspection of Infirmaries. *...*..*.....«...... 98-10 

Tabulated Information Relating to Infirmaries* * * * * * . . . • 

Statistics of Poor Relief* ........... 103-08 



Table I — Huaber of Poop Persons Supported or Believed during 

the Year ending Kerch 31, 1940 

Teble Il-Sunber of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved by the 

State In Institutions, in Private Pastilles end 
la their Own Hones, during trie year end In* 
March 31, 1940 

Table 111-Movesaent during the Year ending March 31, 1940 of the 

Poor Supported or Relieved 

Table IT — number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during 

the Year ending March 31, 1940, classified by 
Color, Nativity and Sex 

Table V— -Sumner of Native-born Poor Persons supported or Believed 

during the Year ending March 31, 1940, classified 
by Parent Nativity 

Table VI— Kunber of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the 

Year ending March 31, 1940 classified by Present 
Age 

Table VII -Number of Mentally Impaired Persons Supported or Believed 

as Poor Persons during the year ending March 31,1940, 
classified by Mental Defect and by Sex 

Table VI II -Number of Poor Persons Discharged fro* Support or Relief 

during the Year ending Hareh 31,1940, classified 
by Character of Discharge and Sex 

Table IX lumber of Foreign-born Persons eho Received Public Welife 

during the Year ending March 31, 1940, classified by 
Countries of Birth 

Table X Percentage of the Various Classes of Persons Relieved at 

Public Expense during the Year ending March 31,1940, 
to the Whole Sfumber so Believed 

Table XI— Kunerical Relation to the Whole Population of the Several 

Classes of Persons Relieved at Public Expense 
during the Year ending March 31, 1940 

Table XII — Cost to Cities and Towns of Supporting and Relieving 

Poor Persons in Institutions, in Private Families, 
and in their Own Bosses 

Table XIII-Met Cost to the State of Supporting and Relieving Poor 

Persons to Institutions and in Families 

Table XIV — Total Bet Cost of Public Poor Relief in Massachusetts 

during the Year ending March 31, 1940 



(Above on file in office of Commissioner) 



THE OQm&WMLTK ttfUflBWBREi 
D£PARttO»T OF PUBLIC lEFiBS 
Arthur 0. Soteh, Coat-issioaer 

To the Bor^r&bie Senate and Ec u so of Bepresentativest 

The Taenty-f irst Annual ftoport of the Department of 
Public Welfare, covering the year from Deceaoer 1, 1939 to 

lovoTtber 30, 1940 Is herewith respectfully pro eon ted* 

Members of the Advisory Board of the Department of Public Welfare 

Bate of Or if tnai Haas ftesldanoe £*tc of 

Apoointaant ^tpi ration 

Dec. 1* 1935 Eery ?• Roberts Chestnut BUI Dec. 1.1941 

Dec. 1, 1936 Frederick P. Bchaid Boston Jan,3i,i943 

Dec. 1, 1933 g&rjorle ft* Stone-han Brookiiae Dee.l, 1941 

Mar** l f 1939 Darid *. Armstrong Worcester Eec.l, 19-40 

Jan. 10, 1940 Eobert Cutler Boston Dec.l, 1940 

June 26,1940 Welter 1* Shales Worcester Jan. 3 1,1943 



COBKXSSIOTO&'S REPORT 
FOB TEAK EHDIKO MOVISMBER, 1940 

The year 1940, which was the first full year since the reorgan- 
ization that was put into effect in the Division of Aid and Relief by 
Mr. David Armstrong, was a very important and active year for the Depart- 
aent, particularly in the Division of Aid and Relief. The Public Welfare 
District Offices established in 1939 continued to function under Acting 
District Supervisors pending the establishment of lists* Important progress 
was aade during the year under the nee plan of reorganisation whereby the 
state departaent supervised the work of the local boards of public welfare 
and bureaus of old age assistance and no longer duplicated the work of the 
local boards and bureaus in making investigations* 

Perhaps one of the most important iteas of the year was the 
necessity of establishing a Serit Systea for all employees of cities and 
towns directly connected with the Federal categories of relief not covered 
by civil service. The departaent endeavored to postpone establishing a 
Merit Systea until the Legislature eaae into session in 1941, and for this 
purpose the Commissioner went to Washington to wake such an appeal to the 
Social Security Board* This request was refused. On April 15 , 1940 the 
Merit System became effective for all employees of local boards of public 
welfare ano bureaus of old ege assistance who r?ere not covered by civil 
service. Then followed a comprehensive Job of classification and finally 
an exaaination was held on September 21, 1940 for agents, supervisors and 
visitors, and on Sept«abor 28, 1940 for clerks. A bill to validate action 
of the Coanissioner and place all positions under civil service has been 
prepared and will be subaitted to the Legislature when it convenes in 1941* 
The Civil Service Departaent cooperated with this departaent in a splendid 
way and conducted the examination for the Merit Systea all over the State. 

2 



As a further result of Federal legislation the Cofaalaalonar 
promulgated a rule forbidding political activity of employee* handling Old 
Age assistance and Aid to Dependent Children both in the department and in 
cities and towns* 

During the past year several positions formerly approved were 
filled through civil services naiaely, Public Welfare Physician - Dr. Benjaain 
f. Kandelstss, Head Medical Social Worker - Mrs, Dorothy A* Gates, and Hone 
Economist - Hiss Blanche P. Diaond. These positions were planned for as 
part of the reorganisation of the Division of Aid and Belief and have added 
great strength to the supervisory work of the departsent and have added a 
consultlve service to the cities and towns which will be of great value for 
the future. The positions of Chief District Supervisor fend Public Welfare 
District Supervisors were not filled during the year because of the nany 
appeals from the results of examinations held in 1939* 

The General Belief load throughout; the State showed a rather starked 
reduction in the number of cases and the aiaount of money spent* In January 
of 19-40* there were 69,310 cases and in December there were 52,023 cases and 
there was a corresponding reduction in the cost. The number of Old Age Assis- 
tance cases continued to rise and the expense Increased about a million 
dollars. Aid to Dependent Children also increased steadily during the year 
with corresponding increase in the asrjount of noney spent for this category 

During the year a new receiving rooa for c ildren under the care of 
the Division of Child Guardianship was obtained end through the efforts of 
the Civic League ICfrild Welfare league) for which help the department is very 
grateful. There is still great need for changes in this division because of 
craaned quarters particularly in connection with the clothlrg roosu 

On June 1, 1945 it was necessary for the departswnt to sign an 
agreement with the Federal Surplus Marketing Adainistr&t ion in order that 
surplus commodities sent to the Comtonweaith si£ht be ^ade available to 

3 



individuals in need in the cities and tonus of the Coeraonwealth. This 

responsibility added greatly to the work of the department and during the 
year in connection with this prog ran several co.tl unities changed frost the 
direct distribution method to the Stamp Plan which bids fair to spread to a 
very large number of cities and towns in the Cosfsonwealtju A bill is to be 
introduced into the Legislature in its next session to confirm the action of 
the Commissioner in signing the agreement with the Surplus Marketing Admin- 
istration* 

The Coaaissioner in his first full year In offiee wishes to thank 
the Advisory Board, the entire staff of the department, the local boards 
of public welfare, and their staffs for their splendid cooperation and help 
during the year* 



DIVISION or AID AKD BHLXJSF 
Freak W. Goodhue, Director 



The Division of Aid sad Belief includes foinr subdivisions! 

Subdivision of Settlements* Subdivision of Supervisors Service, 
Subdivision of Boetel Service to Tevfcttoiiy, Subdivision of 
Appeals* 

the renorts of the supervisors these sub&lvions sre 
herewith submitted* 



The Division of Aid and Relief submits its first annual report since 
the reorganisation of the public assistance program in August 1939* At 
that time the division withdrew from the actual administration of relief, 
from case investigation, and personal contact with relief recipients* It 
abolished the three subdivisions dealing separately with a single category 
of relief and established a generalised supervisory service to local 
boards of public welfare and bureaus of old age assistance* The adminis- 
tration of relief including case investigation, the determination of need 
and the granting of assistance has been assumed by the local boards of 
public welfare as a local responsibility and a function of local government* 
The state department continues to retain the supervision of the expenditure 
of $34,000,000 of Federal grants and State funds which are entrusted to 
local boards to care for the 86,743 old age assistance recipients, 12*535 
Aid to Dependent Children families, and 21,355 unsettled General Belief cases 

An integral part of this supervision is the responsibility and concern 
for the standards of the administration of public assistance in the 351 
cities and towns* It will be admitted freely by local relief officers and 
by the general public that It is the duty of the state department to set 
standards for the administration of public assistance and to assist local 
units to meet these standards so that there may be a uniform service through- 
out the Commonwealth to meet human needs* A " standard" according to the 
dictionary, is "a criterion; a model; that which has been tried by the proper 
test," Professional groups interested in public welfare have developed 
through study and experience such standards and criteria, which public 
welfare officials may now accept and know that they are using the best 
available thought and practice. Believing that persons in need of public 
assistance are entitled to fair and equitable consideration of their needs 
and that local administrators are desirous of meeting these needs in the 
best possible way, the department is establishing through its supervisory 
service such uniform standards. It is giving local boards time and service 
to readjust their programs to meet these standards, but the department will, 
eventually, insist that the standards must be in effect to receive reimburse- 
ment from federal and state funds. The establishment of standards may be 
defined as a gradual process of education to the value of the requirements 
which «ust be clearly understood before acceptance and practice can be 
assured. 

ADMINISTRATION OF HIELIC ASSISTANCE 

The Manual for the Administration of Public Assistance published in 
October 1939 was the first complete guide on rules, policies, and procedures 
of the department, which the local boards had ever receiy ed and was an 
introduction to the new program with its new objectives. 

Records and Forms In January 1940 the next step was taken to establish 
a uniform system of records upon which the department could base its approval 
for reimbursement. These record forms, supplied as needed by the department, 
were installed in every city and town. They do not preclude local records 
but are required by the department as "Notice of Assistance n , as "Certifi- 
cation of Eligibility", and for changes of assistance. The forms, trouble- 
some as they have been to both local and state workers, are helping to 
establish standards of case investigation and case recording. 



-2 



The certification of eligibility (a minimum record of investigation with an 
itemised account of the grant) must be approved by the department repre- 
sentative for the local board to receive reimbursement* Thus, for the 
first time, local boards are required to keep written records of inves- 
tigation, of availability of resources, and of determination of need in 
more or less adequate form, according to the personnel in the local office. 
This requirement has been difficult in the small towns where boards of 
public welfare have no funds to employ assistance or where the staff is 
limited. Inadequacy of personnel has been a great problem everywhere and 
has delayed progress in both local and state offices. 

The year's *ork has produced some results, in that communities have 
begun to recognise that the administration of welfare is a major function 
of government and is often the second largest item in the municipality^ 
appropriations. More important is the growing concern and understanding 
that human needs of persons in distress must have careful and intelligent 
consideration to prevent loss of morale and continued dependency. Aany local 
boards have been able to add clerks, and, in some instances social workers, 
to their staffs to meet the improving standards. It is interesting to note 
that in 170 towns of the 351 communities, which have an average monthly 
case load of less than 100 cases in all forms of relief, 92 of these towns 
have only elected boards of public welfare who have not even a clerk to 
assist them} in 216 towns the monthly average case load was less than 150. 
For these small towns who are struggling to improve their service the 
answer to their difficulties would seem to be an agent, or social worker, 
with a clerk, jointly employed by 2 or 3 towns combining their resources. 
The success of this union has been ably demonstrated by the towns of Ayer, 
Shirley, and Groton, which have employed for the last b years the same 
agent to service their combined case loads with greater benefits to the 
needy and reduced costs to the towns. With the demand for better records 
have come also new filing equipments and larger office accommodations which 
make the work of the welfare office assume its proper importance and dignity. 
The significance of the record should not be out of proportion to other 
needs in the welfare administration, but adequate records do give an amasingly 
true estimate of services rendered, and under present procedures are essen- 
tial to both state and local agencies. 

Standards of Assistance In the past, local boards and bureaus have 
determined their own standards of assistance, or relief allowances, to 
needy persons^ with the exception that the Old Age Assistance Law did es- 
tablish a minimum of $30.00 a month, which has resulted in 75/j of the 
86,743 cases receiving $30.00 a month or less, with little consideration 
of their actual needs. This lack of uniform standard has resulted in 351 
difierent standards set by the intelligence and generosity — or lack of them — 
of the local administrators, a practice obviously unfair to the recipients 
whose allowances have varied not in accordance with need but with the 
community in which they happened to live. To improve this condition the 
Manual contained a chapter on "Budgets" which explained the items of the 
family budget necessary for health and decency, including a standard food 
budget co.iputed scientifically as of June, 1939, and subject to change every 
six months if there were changes of more than 5a in the costs of food. Local 
boards and bureaus were beginning to feel keenly the need of such a guide 
because the right of appeal and fair hearing in Old Age Assistance and 
Aid to Dependent Children categories had shown the varying inadequacies of 
the relief grants. In July, 194-0, a revised budget was released for General 
Relief and Aid to Dependent Children, and a special budget for Old Age 
Assistance was set up to meet the particular situations of that category 



7 



3 



and to give the Division of Appeals a basis for Its decisions* In this 
procedure the item of clothing was looming large because the money for 
food was being used for clothing which had been granted only on a need 
basis* To meet this disturbing but well-known fact when no regular grant 
for clothing is included* a committee of the staff was appointed to study 
clothing costs in several parts of the state to determine a budget figure 
for clothing according to age. sex. and activity* The result of this 
study will be the clothing budget released in 194-1 • 

Valuable as standards are, they do not insure uniformity unless 
accompanied by intelligent interpretation, and the irregularities and the 
inadequacies of relief throughout the state made more urgent than ever 
the need of skilled professional leadership in standards of assistance* The 
appointment of a home economist to the staff supplied this service, much 
wanted by both state and local workers, and will be a most important 
contribution to the whole public welfare program. After a period of study, 
the assistance standards will be established, and adapted to local condi- 
tions and situations, so that all recipients of public assistance will 
have fair and equitable treatment regardless of where they may live* 
Another year, with the continuing cooperation of local boards, should 
show a great advance toward uniform standards. 

Case Reviews In conjunction with the review of the certifications 
of eligibility in the local office, the supervisory service has developed 
a new procedure known as the "Case Review" which, it is hoped, may be substi- 
tuted in the future for the individual case approval as a more constructive 
service to local administration. The case review is a selected spot check 
of the total case load in each category, as to legal eligibility — need, 
available resources, health and medical care, adequacy of grant, and 
continuing eligibility* A tabulation of the findings with a written evalua- 
tion of the total service given in the special category as seen by the re- 
viewer, is ^resented to the local board or bureau for discussion, comment, 
and ctiticism. In this manner the local board has a survey of its ad- 
ministration which aims to be helpful and constructive for better work. 
The case reviews on Old Age Assistance began in mid-summer in cities and 
towns and have proceeded as rapidly as the staff workers could be released 
from their routine work* The technique of the case review will improve 
with practice and the value to local boards will increase as the purpose 
of the reviews becomes better understood and the evaluations more searching 
and comprehensive* Case reviews are 8. continuing process and . 
seem to be the best method devised so far in a supervisory service to 
assist and improve the local social services* 

THE SO PROVISORY. SERVICE 

The purpose and function of the supervisory service of the depart- 
ment's staff is to advise and assist local boards and bureaus to improve 
their standards, to interpret rules, regulations, and policies of the 
department as written in the Manual, and as revised and supplemented by 
the department; to understand the problems of local administrators; to 
confer with local boards and the individual workers on difficult problems; 
and to support efforts to improve local programs. To accomplish this the 
department decentralized its work into seven welfare districts with 
offices in Springfield, Worcester, Laurence, Brockton, Medford, New Bedford 



P 



-4- 



and Boston* The districts were established according to case loads and 

extent of territory to be covered. Each district, except District VII, 
has the supervision of 12-15,000 cases* District VII, including Boston, 
Everett, Somerville, Cambridge, and Brookline, has soma 30,000 cases or 
more under supervision. Each district office is in charge of a district 
supervisor, assisted by a head social worker, a statistical agent, a 
settlement agent, clerical service, and a staff of social workers varying 
in number according to the size of the district* Each stafr worker, or 
so-called "area visitor", has an assigned area of a city, or a certain 
number of towns, in which the local administration of public assistance 
in all categories is his particular and special responsibility* He (or she) 
visits towns regularly according to schedule, to confer with the local 
agent or board on new applications and special problems and to review 
case records for the certification of eligibility and for the change of 
status of closings, and openings, and change in aid. When these records 
are approved, they are sent to the district office for the final approval 
of the district supervisor who forwards t em to the Bureau of Accounts 
which is responsible for certifying reimbursement to local boards. 

that the local boards have responded to this regular service was 
evidenced in preparation for the merit system examination, then local 
workers asked their area visitors to lead discussion groups on law, rules, 
and policies of the department. In two districts local boards arranged for 
eight or ten ; rescribed lectures and discussions, which were later mimeo- 
graphed. In one district two groups of local workers have been meeting 
monthly under the leadership of their area visitors to discuss and improve 
their welfare service. The interest aroused by the staff in their frequent 
and helpful visits to local boards has stimulated new enthusiasms and is 
very definitely improving welfare administration* *he statistical agents, 
whose duties are quite distinct from the area visitors* duties, visit 
their communities rithin their districts to help to install and improve 
fiscal and accounting methods, to check payrolls, and to supervise the 
monthly statistics needed for the monthly reports required by the Social 
Security Board. The settlement agents have reviewed the settlement historic 
submitted with the certifications of eligibility to determine th# settle- 
ment status. They have arranged discussion groups of local workers for 
instruction and clarification in settlement laws. 

The district supervisor with the area visitor frequently visits the 
local offices to discuss policies and procedures, di;*_icult problems, 
and the findings of the case .reviews; group conferences have been arranged 
in areas to discuss common problems, or local boards may co^e to zhe 
district office for advice and assistance. The district supervisors call 
upon the consultants whenever local problems occur which need special 
services. Staff conferences are held in the district offices every two 
weeks to discuss the problems of the communities within the district and 
to review *ith the district supervisor policies and procedures for more 
uniform instructions to the local workers. The area visitors have frequent 
individual conferences with their supervisors to review their areas and 
every six months have submitted written reports so that the district 
supervisors are well informed on the progress and the problems within their 
districts. 

The district offices have been used as centers for meetings with 
local boards or special conferences v-ith other agencies, and it is hoped 
that they may become increasingly useful centers for all aatteri 



-5- 



pertaining to the welfare of the districts. 

The district supervisors have met twice a month Tor conferences 
with theComraissioner, the Director of the Division of Aid and Relief, the 
Chief Supervisor, the Supervisors of Appeals, of Research and Statistics, 
of the Bureau of Accounts, and, recently, the consultants* This group 
discusses and reviews the problems and policies of the department. Here 
the thinking, leading to decisions, is made for the Improvement of the 
service and referred for final approval to the Commissioner and Director. 
The establishment of new rules, approved by the Advisory Board of the 
Department, and of new policies and procedures, have been announced in 
letters from the Commissioner to local boards and bureaus, and will later 
appear in the revised pages of the Manual* 

Consultant Services In September 1940 &rs. Dorothy A* Oates was 
appointed from the Civil Service register as aedical social worker consultant. 
Mrs. Oates had many years experience as a medical social worker in public 
and private hospitals and in recent years has been in the chronic disease 
division of the State Department of Health. In October 1940 Dr. Benjamin W. 
Mandelstam was appointed from the Civil Service register as medical con- 
sultant for the department. Dr. Xandelstam graduated from Harvard Univer- 
sity and Tufts Medical School. After several interneships in private hos- 
pitals he entered private practice from which he cones to this service. 
Medical problems of public welfare are so many and of such infinite variety 
that the combination of a physician and medical social worker should offer 
local boards excellent advice and assistance in setting up new and improved 
medical care. 

In October Miss Blanche Dimond, nutrition supervisor of the Boston 
Community Health Association, was appointed from the Civil Service register 
as home economist for the department. Miss Dimond has had a long and 
successful experience in a public health agency, earning a national repu- 
tation and will give professional leadership in assistance standards. 

Staff Development To keep a staff of 125 in the supervisory service 
In an alert, intelligent, and enthusiastic frame of mind so that work is 
not drudgery but always an interesting adventure for the day, a plan must 
be made to give opportunity for study, for new activities, for the develop- 
ment of hidden capabilities. The year has been very busy and as no super- 
visor of in-training service has yet been appointed it became the added 
responsibility of the district supervisor to keep his or her staff eager 
and alive despite plenty of discouragements. Beginning with the District 
Supervisors' Conference at the Central Office from which the district 
supervisor could carry enthusiasm, policy thinking, and new developments 
to his own staff conference where policies and procedures could be further 
discussed from the knowledge of local levels, and then the fruits of these 
discussions returned to the Supervisors' Conference, has succeeded in making 
the staff constant contributors to the growth of the Reorganisation. The 
Individual conferences with the supervisors have given added security to 
the workers and the line organization has never been undercut. The consult- 
ants have brought new knoTfledge to the staf:, which it passes on to the 
local units. . A conference of all the staff was held all day at the State 
house in December to review the four months' work since the reorganization 
and to prepare for the issuance of the new forms. Staff workers have been 



10 



-6- 



encouraged to attend state conferences on social work and public welfare. 

Staff committees on the budget, on case history outlines, and on the 
change of status, have given staff participation in the problems of the 
administration, and should be encouraged for new and interesting possibilities. 
Latent abilities brought to light have strengthened the service and the 
department hopes ways may be found to offer further training to selected 
workers. The Bookshelf in each district office was established early in the 
year to keep new professional books and magazines available for the inquiring 
mind* 

The danger of large staffs in public work is that they become routine-a 
deadly and insidious influence and only by a well-rounded program of staff 
development, which should be extended to local staffs, can the department 
retain the enthusiasm of its workers and satisfy the individual aspiration. 

The Central Office under the Commissioner and the iJlsector of the 
Division of Aid and Relief is the center which correlates and coordinates 
the activities and services of the districts and their relationship to local 
boards. It sets the standards of public assistance and assumes the leadership 
for the Commonwealth. The director serves as the li&son officer between the 
representatives of the Social Security Board and the department and initiates 
new rules, policies, and procedures to conform with the Social Security Board 
standards. 

The Social Security 3oard representatives for New England, located in 
Boston, have been invaluable with their advice and assistance in the Reorgan- 
ization. They have the experience of the whole country from which to draw, 
and from which the Social Security Board has set uniform standards for the 
forty-eight states with enough flexibility for local conditions. Its purpose 
and motive is to see that all persons throughout this land, entitled to the 
public assistance in which the federal government participates, shall have 
fair and equitable treatment, and if aggrieved, the right of the individual 
of appeal and a fair hearing under uniform procedures. This attitude of the 
Board toward individual need has done much to lessen the stigma of public 
relief and is helping to make public assistance a humane and dignified 
governmental service to which all eligible persons in distress have a right, 
from the state 1 s point of view it should be inspiring to be a part of a great 
country-wide program, established by the Congress, to meet human needs, and 
to share in making at least one state in this great union a better place in 
which to live. The departmert was asked to present its plan for public assis- 
tance and its methods of operation in the state, which was reviewed, and v.ith 
the larger knowledge of the Social Security Board certain aspects were improved 
and amplified. This approved plan became tie outline for its Reorganization 
and operation. Through the year experts on personnel, standards, medical care, 
and staff development have come to Boston for conference and advice,-- -readily 
accessible, and a valuable addition to the highly esteemed consultants per- 
manently stationed here. The fiscal auditors of the Social Security Board 
have audited for fiscal and social exceptions all Aid to Dependent Children 
and Old Age cases active from June 1939 to June 19-40 in the local offices 
and time was allowed to clear the exceptions through the state and local 
ataffs before disallowances were made. Hereafter an administration review 
will be substituted for this audit, a more comprehensive test of local and 
state performance. 

The service of Old Age and Survivors Insurance of the Social Security 



It 



•7 



•"•etir. In January 1940, vaa explained by Its sgents to local 

t J rou « h ^ t th8 1" .roup meeting, and the dejartaen? supplied 

^ S puoUc r aep1^t" ^ " 8V * UablS reBOur « ? « 

SgSafiEaSAgB of loc al Boards and Bure&ua of Aee Assistant. 

I^VT ? V° Ul ? ?° t Cl ^ e ^thout expression or the ?£ Lrk^e SoSper- 
ation experienced in every welfare office throughout the state, in aSceot- 

IZfi?* R t°l g ^ &tion ^ The local board » bien anxious to irn^ovl P 

^f^° rk n bUt the ? ? eed f d ieadership which the department due to it! 
traditional respect for local autonomy has been hesitant to exer?. Now 
that tne department nas accepted its rightful responsibility it recoenires 
it. dependency on the Efforts of local boards and Appreciates not onl? 

Sf^i« n !« Pi J' i ^ bUt , the gPeat help 1411011 the committees of the reliwf 
officers associations have given throughout the year in the niany serolexin£ 
proolems which are constantly arising. The time/it is hoped ^Ls not fir 
ttin^L^ en ^dependence of state and local rtnw'unlf? the 

thinking on public welfare that the resulting strength of conviction Ind 
confidence will establish a public assistant se^e second lo nonS. 

Conciu^iosa The year has been momentous; to break with traditions 
2nd awin^hiV St t tB l heTQ loCal P'erogatives'have always been paramount, 
UJ5 ^ Apartment, our organisation as well as local boards, into ' 
line with the newer and broader objectives for public welfare service. 

c!n ^rth^ r ^ en ?^^ d !5 taki ? g ' *** not * et accomplished. However, one 
can say that the initial education has been well received, that recognition 

wJ^nr«?V f * l™ 1 * 7 S78tea 18 the first ste P toward'improvement? tht? 
t?e^h^ £ ^workers, wanting something better, are alert and willing/on 
SJirl^iSi !° acce Pt new methods, that the assignment of areas to a sinfle 

Jorkertf ? G ™?bf^t Categ r^f S , ° f Z« llef leases the individual staff 
worker's responsibility, and diminishes confusion and misunderstandings in 

Sdiv?^! 011 ^ 68 ^^ ^ em P hasis is *°w on the assistance to ?he 
budilt ^dl^r^ni^!' °?/ l J S le «al settlement, that the use of a standard 
that h?.°^ the r !i i f f grant is being ar S ued but not yet accepted, 

e^^+f 5i!i 0ry ff/ 600 ? 1 is acknowledged as a necessity bul not always* 
SSXi & < &t quall ?> r •nd ^antity of personnel, admittedly inadequate, 
hopes for improvement established by the merit system. <*u«ve, 

a< rf^ T ?M 1UblliUes » wnich the next y e&r «wt turn into assets, are the 
local off Itl^T^. 10 °°tain sufficiently well-trained personnel ^ 
•«tSL?f™ ?J' the almost universal inadequacy of records, the standards for 
estimating the relief grant, the varying standards of social investigation 
doub^ur D ^i??f 4 the iarge expenditures for medical care which may ^o? 
Sen-nrf^rf^V' ^ to ° aAny cases—Old Age Assistance and Aid to 
aTalSnift^ f ° r aP?ea1 ' Sh ° Wing * e *^« ^ supervision 

As *h«se liabilities are checked against the assets the general 
conclusion may be thmt both local and state departments have bf en housed 

2dm a nV^ n » a r rene !f °i J he new order 1111(1 accept the challenge that local 
with *tate supervision will be the most efficient as well 
as the most democratic form of public welfare administration. 



-8- 



STATI3TICS FOR PUBLIC ASSISTANCE 
FOR NCVKUBER 1940 

OLD-AGE ASSI^^Cg AID TO DEPE?j DENT « m „ 



Wo, cases 7/^ 1 / 

Total 2,498'lM raSllol * , (21355 UM «") 

-total nuaber of cases nr^4--,>, 1 

€S recelvi *« departa«nt supervision end reimbursement 



on i*oves:oer 



J-.C 



an .An 




Closings * m 553 

Changes of status (aid) for Hoy loyn 

Total changes oj status for Nov! 1940 I ; .* \ \ \ IV 7 3 



™£MPVmmU OR TBS Yf Afi lo/n 
Gross cost tc cities and t 



*«t cost to cities au-i toUS ?Sr £^1943 



owns for veer 1940 $60,515,830. 



62 



or year 1940.. 517, 637,4 71.0 

16,U1,30^3S 

^ilLal^za^ 



$60, 5X5, 330 » 62 



/3 



SUBDI VISION OF fiRTTT f ir |mrT ^ 
Edward F. Morgan, Supervisor 
The subdivision of s*tt-i*«« *. , 

the sett!™ ^ Ma ? S ^° husetts Hospltal sclW ^S* de P art ^nt , state 
the lnfwfde^LPV 1 ^ 81 ™. There we?e'two nf^ 6 ™ 117 su P"vises 

The following tabl* i ■ « - 

examination tnd investi L?f lnmar £ of the w °rk done during fh* 
institutions: eSUgatlon of settlements of L^ates of the^ta^ 



Institutions 



State Infirmary 
State Farm 

Lakeville State Sanatorium 

tailed q?f, St ? te Sa natorium 
w^c^ d State Sanatorium 

f« 1 ? ld State Sanatorium 
Massachusetts Hospital School 



Totals 



Examina- 
tions 



2384 
5 

236 

Ml 

200 
164 

. IS. 



3145 



Orders 
Issued 



695 

7 

195 
118 
93 
145 
-JJL. 



1268 



Cases pending November 30, 1940 



Settle- No Order* Tota. 
ments Settle- with- 6ast 
Found ment drawn Ret^ni 



457 
3 

186 
115 
78 
122 
-10 



318 

4 
58 

32 

114 
20 

-JL. 



971 553 



485 1260 

? 9 
1 245 

147 

192 

142 

— =— , 17_ 

488 2012 



732 



if 



M 

Q 



Q 



w 

si 
o 

Fh -P 
© S3 

ha © 
© TO S3 

S3 TJ © 
*H P 

S •» I 

TO Jh 
H o 

<D O O 

p,p 



to 



H 0)T) ^ 
i — ! -P iH P 

•h a} £fl 

,Q -P rH 

a S3 D 
JS ^ « « 

P O -P 

v< m a> so 
o o s3 
•k S3 iH 

idt) eg ^ 
O W-P o 

S3 TO « rH 
TO -H rH 

£ >. m O 
o ^ «n 

rH * 00 

H ^ © 
O 9 
p. t*0-P 
E 03 

a> c 
TO -P t3 -H 



P O 

P* TO 
O © 
TO 

a) a} 

o 

•> 

U «M 

0) o 
2 -p 



O 
© a 



-> o 

rH JG 

TO to 
«H 

a> 

43 TO 

TO £ 
0) © 
TO Pi 
TO X5 
© rH 
TO -H 
■H J3 





fj* 


>o 




















• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 




o 












H 


«r\ 


rH 






to 


O 


O 








•v 


•> 








« 


H 






H 


rH 


-4 


c\ 






CM 




CM 


rH 


CM 








H 



« 

o 
o 

Du 

<! 
CO 

o 

rH 

CO 



O 

NO 





* 












€0 




O 


rH 


O 


CO 


o 










CM 


CO 




• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


rH 


00 






CM 


rH 


to 


O 


H 


o 




O 


rH 


c- 


O 


CM 


CM 


O 


O 


on 


t> 






•> 


•> 




« 




rH 


O 




o 


rH 


o 


vO 




-* 




o 


rH 


o 






CM 


rH 






o 


rH 












■ 










CM 




o 














H 


H 


















CM 


sO 


CO 


O 








CM 


o 


o 






CO 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 




O 




H 




CO 


rH 




CM 




vO 




o 






CM 


CM 




»TV 


rH 








% 




•» 


« 


• 




CM 


GO 


rH 


CM 








O 


CO 


rH 


rH 


CM 






VfN 


H 






H 










•> 




• 










CM 




O 


t> 












rH 


H 



rH 


o 


O 




H 


«n 


O 




I> 


O 


CM 




w> 




CM 










•» 


»> 


•s 






rH 


O 


rH 


CM 




» 


H 


CM 




rH 




CO 



CQ 

w 

CO 

co 

M 

Q 

co 

o 
« 
w 
o 

Q 



o 



co 

rH 

CO 
CO 

< 

o 
< 

Q 

r^ 

O 



o 



'3 

O 
H 



TO 



M 

« 

P 
TO 

-P 
CO 

© 

-p 
o 

-p • 

c § 

O «H 
«rH P 
P TO 
TO -P 

P U 

u o 

o cx 

TO- 

§2 

r< P 

-P 

u 

u © 
o jC 

Vi P 

o 

VNrH 
• rH 
TO 

O 

O fn 

*o 

CM «H 
4» 

TO CO 

a> • 
3 o 

rH O 
O * 

S3 -4 



P 

PS 
© 

TO © O 
P, U -H 

© P 

TO 

to a o 

TO «H <h 
^ TO 2 
rH -H 

O H 
• © TO 

tf\ TO S3 
rH © O 
-H 

%H P 
vr\ «H 

o -d 

4^0 TO 
•H CO O 

o © 

SH TO 

U 3 

TO O TO 

fn-P O 

O © 

(X U £> 

e o 

© «h 

E-t S^ © 
P- > 

o 

TO 

u 

TO 

© © TO 

O >s 

r4 C 
O TO 

b vh 

rH TO © • 

TO Q P TJ 
rl rl D 

© TO TJ > 
rH p <H 

P o TO © 
I O 

«H <M © i 



w 

O 



r4 

o 



S3 
TO 



rl 
P 
P 



! 



REMOVALS 



The department is charged with the duty of removing sane poor 
persons to cities and towns within the Commonwealth, or, when 
not belonging in Massachusetts, to the state or place where 
they belong. The following table shows the removals nade 
during the year: 



15J8 



mi 

12 



19AQ 
3 



To other countries 



23 



To other states. 



226 



205 



251 



To towns of residence 



1421 



1,663 



1,710 



1,499 



Supervision of Wayfarer's Lodges and Cheap Lodging Houses 

There is but one municipal lodging house in the Commonwealth known 
as a Wayfarers' Lodge, and this is maintained by the city of Boston, It 
has a capacity for 170 men* No women are lodged. 

The other houses are either commercial or supported by charitable 
corporations. They are located inBoston, Springfield, New Bedford, 
and Fall River, and have a total of 1,702 beds. 

The houses upon inspection by a representative of the department 
were found to be patronized nearly to capacity. Conditions are satisfactory, 
and in general the houses appear to be supplying a well-needed haven for 
wayfarers. 



P 





ANNUAL REPORT OF THE SUB-DIVISION OF SOCIAL SERVICE 
ENDING NOVEMBER 30,19 AO 

The Sub-Division of Social Service carrying on its work as usual has 
served all patients admitted to and discharged from the Tewksbury State Hos- 
pital and Infirmary. As the Supervisor was asked to assist in the Reorganiza- 
tion of the public assistance program in the Division of Supervisory Service, 
the staff workers for the last 6 months have carried the responsibilities of 
administration as well as case loads* 

The number of patients admitted and discharged from the institution for 
the year are as follows: 



Received during the year (males} 


2144 


Females, 440 




2584 


Discharged ■ ■ ■ » 


2336 


■ 484 




2820 


Resident on Nov* 30,1940, H 


2133 


■ 801 




2934 


Daily average * 


1946 


■ 790 




2736 


Largest number on Feb. 5*1940 








3137 


Smallest number on July 18 # 1940 








2361 


Total number cared for 








5515 


The institution's capacity 








3500 


The trend of the population of 1940 has been toward decrease 


in admis- 



sions - 2584 - 160 less than last year* The average daily census 2736 • 

90 less than last year, but this lowest daily census, 2361, is the outstand- 
ing figure comparable only with the boom days of the early twenties. As more 
beds have been available, admissions of persons with legal settlements, who 
need long hospitalization, have been increased to 457 patients, some 200 over 
last year's number. 
SOCIAL SERVICE FOR MEN: 

Undoubtedly the decrease is due, first, to the increase in employment 
of the defense program which kas been absoroing skilled and semi-skilled 
workers, leaving vacancies on farms, which were noticeable in low admissions 

ig 



#2 

of the summer, In restaurants, and laboring Jobs for which our men have 
waited for ten years; second, to the Social Security program of Unemploy- 
ment Compensation benefits which support men while looking for work; and 
to its Old Age Assistance program, available for all citizens over 65 years 
old, who have been residents of this State 5 years out of the last 9 years. 
This last absorption is especially noticeable, as years ago the wards were 
full of able-bodied aged. There are some, however, who are no longer able to 
get work but not yet 65 years old, who come to await that birthday, and for 
whom the social worker initiates the Old Age Assistance application inthe 
community so that there is no delay when the day arrives for then to return 
to community living* 

A further reduction is due to the continued surveillance of applicants 
for admission by the Sub-Division social workers at the office of the Boston 
City Institutions Department, They have interviewed 628 mea; 402 were 
admitted; 73 returned directly to places of settlement; 7 aided under 
Chapter 117 at the Salvation Army hostel; 4 returned to relatives, and 
142 referred to other agencies or withdrew their requests. Some men, former 
patients, who have been refused because of a better disposition, have hitch- 
hiked over the road and asked admission at the institution, and 
other men, having heard of the shelter and good care, applied directly there. 
All such applicants are referred to the local Board of Public Welfare in the 
village which has not the personnel to investigate the need of these men, 
and consequently give admission blanks routinely. Admissions in this manner 
have greatly increased in the last 3 years, from 169 in 1937 to 1*1,2 in 1940. 
Immediate Interviews with these patients after admissions and immediate 
discharge, if no medical care is indicated, to other available resources may 
deter this practice, but as yet it is a growing problem which needs study. 

In the follovrlng table of statistics certain items need comment. 

14 



Men with settlements in 129 cities and towns, in many instances, 

might have been sent direct to the town of settlement if the local Boards, 
where the men applied, had taken more careful settlement histories. 

Alcoholism, the result of which is found far too often in the hos- 
pital wards, presents a real problem for the administration. Seventy- 
three (73) men were so difficult in the wards that they were taken to the 
Lowell Court and 45 sent to the State Farm. If a hospital ward could be 
equipped for treatment and specialized medical care for those who might 
respond to treatment, a much needed service would be provided. There wuld 
have to be selection cf cases based on the social and alcocholic history 
to determine whether the person would benefit by the hospital care, or should b€ 
sent to a correctional institution for an indefinite period. The Infir- 
mary would seem to be the institution to offer such treatment on an 
experimental basis. 

Some careful and fine case work has been accomplished in the 
rehabilitation of men returning to the community. Thirteen (13) who had 
had tuberculosis were rehabilitated with the help of social agencies, 
relatives, and local Boards of Public Welfare. Twenty (20) other men were 
re-established in the community of general relief which ad to be 
supplemented, because of the low allowances, by private agency assistance 
wherever a health problem was involved. 

The follow-up work after discharge has not been as consistent as 
needed, for interviewing and visiting patients in the hospital has left this 
part of the service incomplete. In September a new worker, was added to the 
staff, making four assigned to the men*s servicj and it is hoped a more 
complete social case work Job may be accomplished. With wards crowded with 
chronic sick, ma^of whom will never leave the hospital and who depend 
upon the social worker as an ever ready friend, it has been possible to 



touch only the most pressing needs* 



MEN ADMITTED TO THE TEWKSBURY STATE HOSPITAL & INFIRMARY DORII, r G THE YEAH. 



Ages of Admission! 

21 to 40 440 

41 to 60-.- 1092 

Over 60. • + 612 



Total 2H4 

MEN DISCHARGED FROM TEWKSBURY STATE HOSPITAL & INFIRMARY DURING THE YEAR. 
Discharged to; 

Relatives and friends. ................. 100 

Place of settlement 129 

Court 73 

Employment. .... ........ .208 

Other States , 68 

Other Countries 1 

c # c # c 1 

Other Institutions. 104 

Boards of Health • 3 

Without Investigation • •••• 616 

Absconded. . .661 

Old Age Assistance in cities and towns. .............. . 25 

Total Discharged w 2189 



Deaths • 321 

SOCIAL SERVICE FOR MEN* 
Interviewed at Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary 

Discharged without investigation but interviewed 816 

Listed as social service cases 

(short service, 724; intensive service, 4-38) 1162 

Miscellaneous services to snen in the hospital wards 

Employment found ........ •••••••• • 208 

Assisted to return to other states. . • •/ 68 

Assisted to return to other countries 1 

Rehabilitation of tuberculosis patients •• ....... 13 

Rehabilitated on Old Age Assistance 25 

Rehabilitated on Temporary Aid 20 

Men sentenced for drunkenness from Tewksbury State Hospital and 

Infirmary (through Lowell District Court) 45 

Social Services cases followed up in community 600 



#5 

fcQCIAL SERYICB FOR WOMEN AND CHILDREN: 

The number of patients in the women* 3 ward remains about the same* 

Four hundred and forty (440) were admitted as against 442 in the last year, 

and the number remaining on November 30, 1940 was 801, (Insane, 360) • 

The discharges totaled 401. The accompanying table shows the dispositions. 

WOMEN AND CHILDREN ADMITTED TO TEWKgBURY STATE HOSPITAL AND INFIRMARY, 

DURING THE YEAR 

Ages cf Admission* 

Under 1 year . •••25 

1 to 7 years . . ...... • •.•«•••• 13 

8 to 16 years. ••••« . .......26 

17 to 21 years 60 

Over 21 years • .316 

Total • 440 

BIRTHS .101 

WOMEN AND CHILDREN DISCHARGED FROM TEWKSBURY STATE HOSPITAL AND INFIRM 

MARY DURING THE YEAR 

Discharged to t 

Relatives and friends. •••••••••••• 140 

Employment ••••••••••••••••••«••••••••••• 31 

Employment with child. 61 

Private Agencies^ ••••••••••••••••••••«• 2 

Place of Settlement 24 

Division of Child Guardianship -39 

Girls' Parole Department 23 

Probation Departments of Courts. 15 

Sanatoria • • . . . 1 

State Schools for Feebleminded 8 

State Hospitals ......7 

Other institutions 42 

Absconded • a § 

Total 401 

DEATHS - 86 

COURT WORK; The establishment of oaternity for children born out of wed- 
lock is directed and assisted by the department's attorney* A summary is 
as follows: 

Adjudications of paternity, with court orders for support ...... .13 

Agreements out of court for support of children 10 

(No lump sum settlements were received) 
Money collected for sup, ort of children born out of wedlock $3,355-90 
Money paid out for support of children born out of wedlock 3, 862.08 

Number of bank accounts for children, totaling 84 



The hospital wards are continuously well filled with chronic sick, 
the women's pavilion or ambulatory ward has empty beds which were formerly 
filled with the aged as permanent residents. Now as they reach 65 years of 
age they apply for Old Age Assistance in the community, preferring their littl 

independence to institutional life, 

j 

The maternity ward had 98 admissions. Twenty one (21) 
were from the State Industrial School. As the Women's Reformatory, since 
1939, has not sent patients for confinement, it might be possible to offer 
maternity service to mothers receiving public assistance in the town 
adjacent to Tewksbury. 

The tuberculosis ward for women was closed in October because of 
the small number of admissions, due to the fact that the County Sanatoria 
are meeting local needs and the State Sanatorium at Rutland has available 
beds for patients without legal settlement. The fifteen patients were 
transferred to Rutland, Middlesex County, and the Boston Sanatoria, 

The social workers give immediate service to every woman and child 
by careful investigation to determine their needs and make a plan for their 
rehabilitation when they are ready to leave the hospital. Four workers have 
on the average 35—40 cases as a constant case load, within the hospital, 
awaiting investigation or placement, and one worker, who cares for the 
older women and children who are not State Wards, has a case load of about 
200, all of whom need constant bedside visiting and friendly service. 

The most difficult social problems which need special consideration 
and understanding are those of the unmarried mothers and their babies. The 
social hazards of our communities, retarded mentality, and emotional in- 
stability, due to inheritance and home environment, are the frequent causes 
of these catastrophes. Those (36 in number) who are found to be committable 
feebleminded, are detained at the institution with the expectation of 
permanent custody in a school for the feebleminded; others when they recover 



#7 

■ 



their health are returned to their homes or are olaced at work under 
friendly supervision* 
CHILDREN* S WARD i 

Mothers with their babies after 3 or A weeks in the maternity ward are 
continually transferred to this building where they remain through the nursing 
period or until discharged from the infirmary. Here also are the little wards 
of the State - 60 to 70 - who are unplaceable in foster homes, due to mental 
deficiency and physical handicaps, and other little children, similarly 
afflicted *hose families cannot care for them, because of the sick mother or 
overcrowded home conditions. There would seem to be an increasing number of 
these pitiful cases who have hydrocephalus, spinal bifidas, and other incurable 
diseases. Eleven (11) such children were admitted, and 8 have died within 
the year. There is no other hospital available which will accept them, and 
although they rightfully belong to the care and custody of the Department of 
Mental Health, it refuses to consider them because they are uneducable, and 
need nursing care only. It is an unreasonable hardship for a family or local 
board of public welfare to pay $9.00 a week on a settled case when care of 
such mental cases should be free. 
SUPERVISION IN THE COMMUNITY! 

The after-care of patients discharged from the hospital tends to prove 
whether the social planning was well considered. Five hundred and eighteen 
(513) persons were under active supervision, receiving some assistance 
within the last 6 months. Some may have had intensive service, such as re- 
placements at work, arrangements for foster care of the baby, medical follow* 
up in a monthly clinic; others may have made only friendly visits to the office 
to report progress. This rehabilitation program is always absorbingly worth- 
while and challenges ones best efforts. One staff worker fits into the prograr 
of all the others as she assists in the after-care for all the patients. She 



I 

meets them as they come from the infirmary (668) helps them to their many 
destinations, accompanies patients to the clinics, arranges vacations, pays 
extra railroad fares, provides meals, temporary shelter, and much needed 
clothing. Friendly advice and assistance are given to former wards of the 
State who have reached 21 years and are referred for further supervision. 

Applications at the office are accepted from other agencies or 
individuals to prevent unnecessary admissions to the infirmary. Some are 
referred for placement and supervision, but the larger number are for 
transportation to other States. 

The working arrangement with the Travelers Aid Society expedites 
assistance to transients in that the agency* s investigations and recommenda- 
tions are accepted for railroad or bus fares, and other necessary traveling 
expenses. Applications totalled 218; sixty-five (65) were single men, 19 singl 
women, 6-4 children travelling with 56 parents; 26 were between the ages of 
16-20 years old; 119 were returned to legal residence and 33 to relatives, 
L47 returned to other states, 1 to Canada; 68 were referred by the Travelers 
Aid Society, 68 by the Boston Overseers of Public Welfare, 33 by other 
Boards of Public Welfare. 
STUDENTS FROM THE SCHOOL OF SOCIAL WORKi 

Two first year students, young men, came fromBoston College School of 
Social Work for their field work at the infirmary. A second year student 
from Simmons School of Social Work made an interesting study of one year's 
admissions of unmarried mothers to the infirmary, and from which she wrote 
her thesis for her Master's Degree. Such research findings are very valuable 
in review of present policies and procedure and fundamental thinking as to 
future treatment and method. 

CONCLUSION: The Sub-Division wishes to express its appreciative cooperation 
and consideration given the staff by the Commissioner, the Director and Dr. 
Kelley and his staff at the Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary. 



#9 



SUMMARY OF SUPERVISORY WORK 

Persons under active supervision, Hovember 30, 1940 ....... .518 

(Mothers with 35 children at work) 35 

Mothers boarding children in foster homes 157 

Other women and children under supervision 283 

(In institutions 28) 

Other children under supervision 43 

(In own homes or foster homes) 

Children referred for placement to Division of Child Guardianship . .37 

Girls over 21, accept for supervision . . . 18 

Prom Division of Child Guardianship 16 

From Girls' Parole Department 2 

Adoptions of children under supervision ...•••..••••••.14 

(6 by relatives; 8 by strangers) 

Marriages of unmarried mothers while under supervision ... 17 

Replacements in employment •••••• ••••••• .151 

Readmissions to Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary for Illness. • 31 

Visits of investigations 1022 

Visits to clients at home, at work, at office ............ 1863 

Visits of clients to hospitals accompanied by worker •••••••• 131 

Wage homes investigated for employment •• ......... 151 

58 savings accounts for clients at work, amounting to ... . .£7,168.13 

Applications at office 349 

For maternity service ••• • • • • • 89 

Fcr social treatment ....... i 42 

For transportation ••••• •••... 218 

(154 adults and 64 children) 



i — • 



SUBDIVISION OF APPEALS l 9A0 

Louis R. Lipp, Supervisor 
OLD AOS ASSISTANCE APPEALS 
Chap, 481, Acts of X939 

The number of appeals pending - 307 December 1, 1939. The number of appeals 
received from December 1, 1939 to November 30* 19-40 - 2487, making a total 
of 2794. 

166 appeals were withdrawn by appellants 

144 appeals were closed by granting of assistance by local bureaus 
17 appeals were closed as appellants died before decision rendered 
1835 appeals were investigated by appeal referees 
1415 hearings were held 

Appeals pending November 30, 1940 - 308 

The following are the principal reasons for denial by the local bureaus: 



Action on Appee 

Number Approved Denied 

Transfer of real estate or personal property 103 36 67 

Eligibility relating to age, citizenship and residence 73 36 37 

Deserving citizens 42 21 21 

Personal funds in excess of 1300.00 i& 33 35 

Unsatisfactory explanation of expenditure of funds 105 32 73 

Retroactive payments 3 3 

Sufficient resources in the family 752^ 229 525 

Appeals for increases 850i 335 515 



Appeals received by districts as follows; 



Pistrtotr $1 












Adams 


18 


Huntington 


1 


Wales 


4 


Agawaa 


8 


Lee 


2 


Ware 


7 


Amherst 


1 


Lenox 


1 


Warwick 


1 


Bernards ton 


2 


Longmeadww 


4 


Westfield 


8 


Cheshire 


1 


Ludlow 


1 


West Springfield 


22 


Chester 


1 


Monson 


i 


West Stockbridge 


1 


Chicopee 


32 


Montague 




Williamsburg 


2 


Clarksburg 


3 


New Marlboro 




Williams town 


1 


Colraln 


2 


Northampton 


/ 23 


Windsor 


1 


Deerfield 


1 


Northfield 


2 


Worthing ton 


1 


Easthampton 


2 


North Adams 


6 


TOTAL 




East Longmeadow 


2 


Orange 


7 






Erving 


1 


Palmer 


5 


District 42 




Granville 


1 


Pittsfield 


35 




Greenfield 


11 


Plainfield 


1 


Ashbumham 


1 


Hampden 


2 


South Hadley 


1 


Ashland 


1 


Hancock 


1 


Southwick 


2 


Athol 


5 


Hatfield 


3 


Springfield 


263 


Auburn 


8 


Holyoke 


37 


Sunderland 


1 


Ayer 


1 






Barre 


2 



J. 7 



Pill Wifi Ju£LSSS^C 


1 X 


col ton 


1 




X 


brOOiCl leia 





Clinton 


<5 

A 


lAluXS/ 


1 
X 


r x tciiuurg 


it 


f raiuxjlgiiciui 


w 


t-. -A /4 W% a 

uaraner 


1 f\ 
1U 


oral ton 


A. 


riaruwicic 


o 

7 


Harvard 


1 


n Oil is ton 


JL 


alio oarc s t on 


1 


mia son 


1 


Lancaster 


c 

5 


Li6iC6Ster 


2 


bNUOi ter 


Q 


Littleton 


3 


siariDoro 


12 






IS 4 1 f 

Minora 


1 


Sill ULLT/ 


aC 


V. 4-4 „> 

riatlCa. 


1 / 


aor wiijI lugs 


X 


piortn o too til leid 


1 


uxi ora 


2 


Pax ton 


1 


iioya-Lauon 


X 


nutiana 


> 
X 


uouuiuricigv 


n 
% 




X 


f At* i ^ rf 

j i/criing 


X 


otOW 


T 
X 


O f» r, t« *4 rf A 

oiurDriuge 


X 


°utton 


1 




X 


iownsena 


2 




X 


TT i^v 4" #*MWj 

up ton 


X 


uAuriuge 




Warren 




neoster 


o 


W A*. M 4" T3 a> r *j A 4" AM 

('est bo/. lst; on 


{. 


west uroo^u leia 




Rcsti ora 


1 


nincrienaon 




Worcester 


73 



District #3 

Andover 3 

Beverly 12 

Eillerlca 4 

Burlington 1 

Chelmsford 2 

Danvers 4 



l>racut 


ti 
2 




2 


Georgetown 


7 


Gloucester 


22 


Groveland 


4 


xtamiiton 


1 


UdvukVi A 1 1 

navernxii 


lpu 


Ipswich 


2 


Lawrence 


13 


Lowell 


2-V 


Kerrlmac 


X 


He oxiuen 


i 

4 


i< ew Duxy 


m 


5 ewburypo r t 


t* 
3 


iiortn Anaover 


T 
X 


reaoouy 


11 


neauing 


o 


oax x s Duxy 




^ # > Mill Vl% t >*t r 

i ewics Dury 


z 

o 


west aewDury 


o 
ft 


Wilmington 


c 


TOTAL 








Arlington 


21 


Bexaont 


T 1 

14 


Chelsea. 


i 


voncorci 


c 



Lexington 


3 


uincoxn 


X 


i#ynn 


7Q 

17 


Lynnxlela 


2 


Hal a en 




M&rDleneacl 


X 


MeaT ora 


Jl 


Melrose 


x5 


VJ _ „ J V-N ab 

neeaaaa 


4 


Newton 




«eyer€ 


11 


caiesi 


Q 


Saugus 


m 

5 


otonenan 


14 


Swampscott 


3 


naKei leia 


M 
W 


>iaitll£i11 y 


3 l 


Ratertown 




wellesley 




Weston 




Winchester 


10 



Winthrop 4"5 
Wo bum IB 
TOTAL A69 



District #5 




Abington 


9 


A X. X. ^ . % 

Attleboro 


22 


Avon 


2 


Bellinghara 


2 


Braintree 


1 


Bridgewater 


3 


V> ■ A 

Brockton 


91 


Canton 


1 


Carver 


1 


Cohasset 


2 


Deahaifl 


6 


East Bridgewater 


3 


Foxboro 


9 


•franklin 


4 


TV « • jt 

Halifax 


1 


Hanover 


3 


TT »% « * 

Holbrook 


7 


TV— ^ 1 

Hull 


1 


Kingston 


7 


Mansfield 


1 


Marshf ield 


2 


Medfield 


1 


Middleboro 


6 


Milton 


3 


North Attleboro 


7 


Norfolk 


4 


WV "j 

Norwell 


1 


Norwood 


X 


Plymouth 


5 


Quincy 


23 


Randolph 


5 


V*i — .i ^ _ - 31 

Rockland 





Scituate 


4 


Taunton 


30 


Walpole 


7 


West Bridgewater 


1 


Westwood 


1 


Reyiaouth 


29 


Whitman 


4 


Wrentham 


2 


TOTAL 


3^24 


District #6 




Acushnet 


9 


Barnstable 


1 


Chatham 


1 


Dartmouth 


( 


«\J .T A. 

Dighton 


3 


Edgar^own 




Fairhaven 


5 


^ WJ v^ • _ 

Fall River 


A.O 

69 


Falmouth 


A 

3 


Harwich 


4 


Lakeville 


i 


Marlon 




Mattapoisett 


1 



District #6 Cont'd. 



IS Bedford • 23 

Province town 5 

F eh o both 1 

Sandwich 2 

Swansea 14 

flareham 2 

Westport 5 

Yarcaouth A 

TOTAL 1M 

Boston 206 

3rookline 27 

Cambridge 105 

Everett 12 

Soaerville 83 

TOTAL Ui 



District #1 543 

District #2 244 

District #3 306 

District #4 469 

District #5 324 

District #6 168 

District #7 A3! 

TOTA fr SE 



AIR m VftfVXVmX CHILDREN 
Chap* 2^8, Acts of 1939 



112 appeals received 

10 appeals were withdrawn 
89 appeals were investigated 
1L hearings were held 
4& appeals were approved 
kU appeals were denied 

Appeals pending Hoveaber 30, 1940 — 20. 

Of the ninety decisions that were made the following are the reasons for 
denial by the iocal boards: 

Action on Appeal 



Auto 

Excess teal estate 

No application made 

Eligibility 

Hot in the home 

Increases 

Sufficient income 

Fraud 

Incapacitated father 
Unsatisfactory expenditure of funds 
Transfer of property 
Fitness of parent 

Refusal on part of iocal board to grant 
Aid to Dependent Children— transfer 
one town to another 

toaall received bx &ll&l£fai && follows; 



Approved 

1 
1 



7 
15 

1 
3 

9 
9 



Denied 



3 

2 
8 

8 
3 
3 
4 
3 
6 



District #1 




District #3 




District ft 




District #7 




Buckland 


1 


Eillerica 


2 


Attleboro 


2 


Boston 


13 


Chicopee 


1 


Dracut 


1 


Bellingham 


1 


Cambridge 


1 


Clarksburg 


1 


Gloucester 


1 


Bralntree 


1 


Everett 


2 


Colrain 


1 


Haverhill 


1 


Brocktcn 


2 


Soaerville 


6 


Holyoke 


1 


Lawrence 


2 


Canton 


2 


TOTAL 




Montague 


* 


Merriaac 


1 


Foxboro 


1 




lew Ashford 


1 


lewburyport 


2 


Hanson 


1 






Northampton 


1 


Korth Reading 


1 


Holbrook 


1 






Orange 


1 


TOTAI, 


IT 


Middleboro 


2 






Palmer 


1 




Norwood 


3 






South Hadley 


1 






fcuincy 


1 






Springfield 


2 






Raynham 


1 






TOTAL 


1ST 






Rockland 
Scltuate 
Stoughton 
Weymouth 
TOTAL 


1 
1 
1 
2 
23 







District 42 
Ayer 

Fitchburg 
IClllbury 

Horth Brookfleld 
Oxford 
Webster 
Westboro 

Worcester total 



1 
1 
1 
1 
1 
1 



4 



District #A 

Lynn 

Maiden 

Hewton 

Revere 

Saugus 
Stonehaia 
Watertown 





District #6 








A 


Barnstable 


1 


TOTALSi 
DisWl 




6 


Dennis 


1 


16 


1 


Fall River 


A 


Dist.#2 


10 c 


2 


Falmouth 


1 


Dist.#3 




1 


Rochester 


1 


Dist.M 


19^ 


1 


Seekonk 


1 


Dist.jr5 


23 


1 


Swansea 


1 


Dist.#6 


11 


Westport 

TOTAL 


1_ 

11 


Dist.#7 

TOTAL 


22 

1 1 2 



BUREAU OF RESEARCH AND STATISTICS 
JOHN J. DONNELLY, SUPERVISOR OF WELFARE STATISTICS 



The Bureau of Research and Statistics completed its fourth year 
at the end of 194-0. The personnel, appointed under Civil Service 
regulations, consists of a Supervisor of Welfare Statistics assisted by 
Field Representatives, Senior Statistical Clerks, and a clerical and 
stenographic force, totalling 35 persons. The functions of the unit 
include collecting, compiling, analyzing and publishing statistics of 
the principal types of Relief which may be enumerated as follows: 

1. Statistics of assistance and aid administered 
under the provisions of Titles I and IV of the Social Security 
Acts Title I — Grants to States for Old Age Assistance, 

and Title IV — Grants to States for Aid to Dependent Children. 
These Titles require that the State agency administering 
Old Age Assistance and Aid to Dependent Children shall make 
reports in such form and containing Information as the 
Social Security Board nay from time to time require, and 
shall comply with such provisions as said board may find 
necessary to assure the correctness and verification of 
the reports. 

2. Statistics of GeneraV Relief administered under 
the laws of the Commonwealth and the regulations of the 
Department of Public Welfare . This information is submitted 
by every city and town in the Commonwealth each month on 
prescribed forms and is combined by the bureau into county 
and state totals. 

3. Statistics on the several most important types 



61 



-2 



of relief from ten of the largest cities of the 
Commonwealth, consolidated into what is called the 
"Urban Survey" and figures for 23 selected towns 
collected and compiled into a report known as the 
■Rural Survey", 

4. Statistics of Soldiers* Relief granted 
under the laws of the Commonwealth and the regula- 
tions of the Department of State Aid & Pensions. 
Through the courtesy of the Department of State Aid 
and Pensions, the bureau was given the opportunity 
to collect data on the number of cases, the number 
of persons represented, and the amount expended 
monthly by each city and town* 

5. Statistics of other types of aid and 
assistance administered by other state and federal 
agencies in furtherance of the policy to develop the 
bureau as a clearing house for all kinds of statis- 
tical information relative to the entire Social 
Security program. Therefore, the bureau has 
maintained tabulations of data secured from the 
following ^ocal agencies;- pepartment of Education, 
Division of the Blind; Work Projects Administration; 
National Youth Administration; Federal Old Age Insur- 
ance; Unemployment Compensation Commission; Civilian 
Conservation Corps, and the Surplus Commodities 
Division of the Department of Public Welfare, 

6. Statistics with respect to matters 
closely associated with relief. Tabulations are 



-3- 



maintained by the bureau on employment data compiled 
and published by the Department of Labor and Industries; 
the Index of Industrial Activity in Massachusetts 
complied by the State Planning Board; the Cost of Living 
Index published by the Department of Labor and Indus- 
tries, Commission on the Necessaries of Life; other 
miscellaneous statistical information which may be used 
in describing or analyzing the Relief situation. To all 
these cooperating agencies we here extend our acknowledg- 
ment for the permission granted us to republish their 
figures. 

7. Statistics relative to the social phases of 
the various types of relief administered by the department, 
collected on prescribed Social Data Cards. 

The staff of the bureau includes several different Civil 
Service Classifications. The two most numerous are the 7 Social Workers 
(field representatives) and the 14 Senior Statistical Clerks. The 
Social Workers, each of whom represents the bureau in an assigned 
area of the state, advise and assist the local boards and cf ficials 
relative to maintaining welfare records, compiling the regular or 
special reports and filling out the Social Data Cards. 

The bureau is organized -so that the compiling and tabulating 
work is apportioned by type of relief among several groups into which 
the staff is divided. Definite assignment of duties is made to each 
group which consists of the necessary number of workers required to 
perform the assignments and having the requisite qualifications. 

In addition to complete files of the various types of relief 
statistics for each city and towa, the bureau maintains up-to-date 

53 



4- 



records for the several counties and for the Commonwealth as a whole. 

The regular monthly summaries submitted to Washington, complied 
from the individual city and town reports, and covering the various types 
of relief, show the case load, expenditures and average expenditures per 
recipient. 

During 1940 the following payments were granted to recipients of Old 
Age Assistance: 

TABLE I 
Old Age Assistance — 1940 



1240 
J 
F 
M 
A 
If 
J 
J 
A 
S 

N 
D 

Average 



No. of cases 

82 758 

83 033 
83 405 

83 837 

84 U8 

84 803 

85 176 
85 473 

85 996 

86 493 
86 743 
36 m 
84 896 



Amount expended 
$ 2 371 810 

2 401 019 

2 A15 302 

2 411 958 

2 410 964 

2 419 910 

2 433 364 

2 439 477 

2 450 979 

2 ^77 593 

2 498^102 

2 537 400 
29 267 878 (a) 



Average per recipient 
$28.66 
28.92 
28.96 
28.77 
28.65 

28.54 
28.57 

28.54 
28.50 
28.65 
28.80 
29.19 
28.73 



Notex (a) Total for the year. 

A survey of the data in Table I above shows with two exceptions 
in expenditures, uninterrupted increase from month to month during the year 
in cases and expenditures. The Federal Grants in 1940 on Old Age Assistance 
amounted to $14 323 452 while the State and cities and towns' shares were 



♦9 962 951 and $4 981 475 respectively 



It will be seen that a steady increasing tendency from month to 
month was present in the number of families and children on Aid to Dependent 
Children during 194-0. Although expenditures showed a general increase during 
the year, the month to month change was not quite so regular. Data relative 
to this type of relief are presented in Table II below. 

TABLE II 
AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN 
1940 

Average expenditure 



1940 


Families 


Children 


Amount expended 


Per family 


Per cnild 


J 


11 273 




inn 
lit 


* Aft! 


iifOX. 


$60*45 


$23.68 


F 


11 450 


29 


187 


686 


948 


60.00 


23.54 


■ 


11 613 


29 


537 


701 


809 


60.43 


23.76 


A 


11 761 


29 


842 


693 


076 


58.93 


23*22 


If 


11 94S 


30 


237 


689 


678 


57.72 


22.81 


J 


12 069 


30 


473 


706 


568 


58.54 


23.19 


J 


12 157 


30 


523 


706 


066 


58.08 


23.13 


A 


12 304 


30 


796 


708 


356 


57.57 


23.00 


S 


12 308 


30 


744 


712 


843 


57.92 


23.19 





12 452 


30 


930 


717 


186 


57.60 


13.19 


N 


12 535 


31 


082 


733 


309 


58.50 


23.59 


D 


12 512 


31 


Q86 


748 


174 


59.80 


24.07 


verage 


12 032 


30 


268 


#8 435 


494 (a) 


53.77 


23.36 



Note: (a) Total for the year. 

The Federal Grants on Aid to Dependent Children amounted to 
|2 519 971 the State »s share was $2 828 498 and the cities 1 and towns* 
$3 137 025. 



-6- 

Pigures on General Relief do not have the regularity from month 
to month exhibited by the so-called categorical types of relief. This is 
due, of course, to the fact that the trend of General Relief is affected 
by industrial employment conditions, by general business conditions and by 
the trend of employment in work relief programs. Also a definite seasonal 
movement is evident in this typo of relief, it being less in the late Spring 
and Summer months than in the Fall and Winter months. The 194-0 figures are 
presanted in Table III below. The decreases in the number oi case3 and 
expenditures during the year are notable. 

TABLE III 
GENERAL RELIEF — 194-0 



Number of Number of Total number Amount Average Average Average 



families 


single 


residents 


of 


cases excended 


Der family Per sin. res 


•cer cas 


49 782 


20 


227 


70 


009 


$ 1 981 923 


♦31.93 


$19.40 


$28.31 


48 439 


19 


325 


67 


764 


1 834 543 


30.46 


18.57 


27.07 


49 380 


19 


482 


68 


362 


1 910 017 


30.86 


19.81 


27.74 


48 682 


19 


797 


68 


479 


1 827 743 


29.37 


18.87 


26.69 


46 722 


20 


467 


67 


139 


1 802 480 


30.23 


19.06 


26.83 


43 975 


20 


104 


64 


079 


1 605 027 


28.68 


17.11 


25.05 


44 553 


20 


618 


65 


171 


1 743 163 


30.58 


18.71 


26.82 


42 627 


20 


195 


62 


822 


1 624 379 


29.33 


18.55 


25.86 


39 154 


19 


029 


58 


133 


1 528 681 


29.47 


17.92 


26.27 


38 435 


18 


912 


57 


347 


1 555 323 


30.16 


18.42 


27.12 


35 002 


17 


543 


52 


545 


1 451 542 


31.04 


18.38 


27.62 


35 150 


16 


915 


52 


065 


1 £81 508 


31,63 


19.12 


28.51 


r.43 492 


19 


384 


62 


376 


$20 354 329 ( 


a)30.35 


18.66 


26.98 



Hote« Total for the yatr. 



-7- 

In addition to the regular periodic reports submitted by the bureau 
;o Washington and used by the department, there are frequent calls for special 
•eports or tabulations which usually describe 3ome particulaiphase of the 
•elief situation in more detail than can be obtained from the regularly 
jublished reports of the bureau. The greater number of such requests this 
/ear as compared with last year indicates not only the growing interest in the 
relfare problem from a statistical viewpoint, but, in a measure, evaluates the 
(fork of the bureau as a public agency. Such organizations as chambers of 
commerce, taxpayers 1 associations, private welfare units and universities 
frequently ask for data which the bureau has available and such requests 
are always welcome. 

Some of the special studies and surveys inaugurated in the previous 
/ear were either completed or carried on during 1940 and otner new ones were 
begun. For example, the collection of Soldiers* Relief data was better estab- 
Lished so that this type of assistance Jias become one on which the bureau now 
receive regular monthly reports. 

The study of local procedures, records and forms continued during 
the year and the findings will be valuable when uniform local procedures and 
basic records are introduced in the enear future as is now planned. 

The collection of figures on local A.D.C. administrative expenses 
continued during the year as a regular reporting procedure for which the 
bureau made up reporting forms and instructions for the use of the local boards. 
This information is collected regularly each quarter so that reimbursement to 
the state, cities and towns from federal funds for A.D.C. administration 
expenses will be forthcoming. 

The collaboration with the graduate school of Public Administration 
of Harvard University on the study of local relief and expenditures as 



37 



-8 



related to the fiscal abilities of Massachusetts cities and towns continued 
during the year. In 1939 the study developed beyond the facilities of the 
bureau, so plans were made to continue the work this year by a W.P.A. project 
sponsored by the Department and supervised by the bureau. 

The survey with regard to the organization of local welfare boards 
made in the previous year was reviewed and brought up to date so that a cur- 
rently correct record of local welfare board staffs became available. Some 
minor changes were made in our basic report forms due to changes in reporting 
requirements or changes in the law, but except for these the collection and 
compilation of our basic statistical data continued much the same as in the 
previous year. 

Information and data published from time to time by the bureau 
appears either in special reports or in one of its regular publications such 
as the Quarterly Bulletin. This contains various summary tables, with the 
latest available figures, presenting all the different types of data compiled 
by the bureau. Special bulletins are issued at times, the most recent being 
Special Bulletin No. 7, giving for each city, town, and county and for the 
Commonwealth the 194-0 expenditures on the principal types of relief. 

In conclusion, it may not be amiss to repeat what was expressed in 
the revious years 1 reports. As the work of the bureau progresses it is 
anticipated that it will improve in quality, where the possibility of 
Improvement exists, and that its scope wiH. be progressively wider. It is 
planned as time goes on to give increased attention to the research phase 
of the work in which there are almost unlimited possibilities. Efficient 
and effective service to the Commissioner and the other policy making officials 
of the department, to the cities and towns and to all State agencies, public 
or private, are among our main objectives. The interchange of information 
among the various agencies concerned with the Social Security program has been 

3<r 



-9- 



ind will continue to be encouraged by the bureau. Finally we wish to thank 
ill the many cooperating individuals and agencies for their assistance 
luring the year with the assurance that any facts or figures in our possession 
ire always available to them. 



3<? 



Licensed Boarding Homes for Aged Persons 
G. Frank McDonald, Supervisor 

In Massachusetts today in 150 cities and towns, there are operating 
686 licensed Homed for Aged Persons, sometimes called convalescent or 
rest homes* 

Under General Laws, chapter 121, section 22A, which provides that 
■whoever maintains a home in which three or more persons over the age 
of sixty years and not members of his immediate family are provided 
with care, incident to advanced age, shall be deemed to maintain a 
boarding home for aged persons" this department is delegated to issue 
licenses and to make, alter, and amend the rules and regulations of such 
homes. 

During the past year the department received 188 applications for 
licenses; of these, 1 M were granted after investigation; 237 licenses 
were renewed, and 64 licenses were canceled, 8 £f these for improper 
treatment of inmates. 

With one-quarter of all the elderly people in Massachusetts over 
sixty-five years of age receiving old age assistance benefits, one of 
the most extraordinary developments in connection with this has been 
the mushroom growth of these boarding homes for aged persons. 

The problem of regulating them has increasingly occupied the atten- 
tion of the department. In 1940, following an intensive survey, the 
regulations were revised. 

An applicant to maintain a home ruust first have the signed approval 
of the chairman of the local board of public welfare, and be reconnended 
by at least three doctors or clergymen. The premises must be approved 
by the local building inspector. When the license is granted, the noma 
is subject to the following regulations: 



-2- 

RULES AND REGULATIONS 



For the information and guidance of persons licensed to operate 
boarding homes for the aged the department has formulated the following 
minimum requirements. These regulations are not intended to cover all 
details, out will serve to inform licensees and others of the general 
policy of the department with regard to maintaining licenses, 

1, For the purposes of these regulations a convalescent home or hospital, 
rest nome, hone for the aged, nursing home or other institution of 
similar character, regardless of designation, caring for three or more 
persons over the age of sixty and not incorporated under Incorporated 
Charities, (Chapter 121, section 7 of the General Laws), shall be 
deemed a hoarding home for aged persons, 

2. No person suffering from a contagious disease shall be admitted, 

3« No boarding home shall provide prenatal care or admit maternity cases. 

(Chapter 111, sections 71-73.) 
4« No boarding home shall admit or care for persons who are suf- ering 

from insanity, epilepsy, abnormal mental conditions, or those who are 

addicted to the intemperate use of narcotics or stimulants so as to 

have lost the power of self-control. 

For the purposes of this regulation there is included in this restriction 
any person who is under commitment for any of the above conditions in 
any institution under the jurisdiction of the Massachusetts Department 
of Cental Health. 

5, Homes caring for convalescents and the chronic sick shall make provision 
for necessary medical care by a medical doctor registered under the 
General Laws of Massachusetts. (Chapter 112, sections 2-12a) 

6. Homes caring for convalescents and the chronic sick shall have the 
resident supervision of a nurse registered under the General Laws of 
Massachusetts. (Chapter 112, sections 74-81) 

4 



-3- 

7. No boarding home shall keep within its confines opium, morphine, cocaine, 
heroin, codeine or other habit-forming drugs as dei'ined in chapter 94, 
section 197 of the General Laws, or a hypodermic needle or syringe or 
other instrument adapted for the use oi narcotic drugs by subcutaneous 
injection, excepting that a registered nurse may keep in her possession 
a hypodermic syringe or needle and nay have in ner ; ossession and 
administer said drugs only under the specific directions of a physician 
as provided for in chapter 9U$ sections 197 and 211* An accurate record 
must be kept of all such treatments • 
8. All poisonous substances must be plainly labelled and kept in a locked 
closet or cabinet, 

9» Patients shall occupy sleeping rooms on the second floor cf any building 
only when two spearate exits consisting of separate stairways, front and 
rear, are provided. A single interior stairway may be supplemented with 
exterior stationary fire exit. 

10. Patients may occupy sleeping rooms above the second floor only in 
buildings of first-class fireproof construction. 

11. All rooms must be outside rooms with a minimum of 600 cubic feet of air 
space allowed for each person. Dormitories shall be limited to six (6) 
beds. 

12. All beds used for patients shall be at least 36 inches in width, six 

feet in length, and so spaced to permit freedom of movement on tnree sides. 

13. Patients { quarters shall not be locked/ hooked or fastened in any manner. 
U. Adequate toilet facilities j^ust be available on each floor where five or 

more patients are being domiciled. 

15. Instructions governing emergency exit in case of fire must be posted in 
each room. 

16. Dietary schedules must be maintained and a record of such accurately kept 
for inspection by the department. 



-u- 

17* A register approved by the department, showing the record of each 

patient must be maintained, 
18. All holies operated under a license granted by this department 3hall be 

so conducted as not to become a nuisance to, or an annoyance in, the 

community where located* 

These regulations are sufficiently comprehensive to guarantee the comfort 
of old people. 

Local boards of public welfare and welfare workers are asked to familiarize 
themselves with the regulations and after their visits to report ano- 
vulation to the department. 



¥3 



CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS SELECTING AGENCY 
Lauretta C. Bresnahan, Supervisor 
On November 1, 1939, the State Department of Public Welfare was 
appointed the official representative of the Office of the Director of 
the Civilian Conservation Corps in the Commonwealth of Massachusetts, 
for the purpose of carrying out established policies and procedures 
incident to the selection of junior enrollees for the Civilian Conserva- 
tion Corpi. 

The State Selecting Agency is responsible for: 

1. Maintenance of a statewide organization for the purpose of 
receiving CCC applications, verifying legal and administrative 
eligibility, evaluating personal qualifications of applicants, 
and carrying forward all other necessary responsibilities of 
CCC selection. The organization for this worfc includes the 
chairman or agent of each of the 351 local boards of public 
welfare in the cities and towns of the Commonwealth. In view 
of the fact that the State Department has no administrative 
control over local boards of public welfare, compliance to 
uniform CCC standards is maintained through friendly supervision 
of the Supervisor of Selection, who travels throughout the Com- 
monwealth in order that each local agent may be contacted, 

2. Interpretation of the CCC program to local selecting agents 
through bulletins, manuals, pamphlets, and letters of instruction, 
as well as through training classes and conferences, 

3. Contact with CCC officials in the United States War Depart- 
ment on Corps Area, District, and Camp levels, and with the 
CCC officials in the United States Departments of Interior and 
Agriculture. 



4. Counselling with selected applicants in order that they will gain 
the greatest value from their enrollment in the Corps; contact while 
enrollees are in camp; and evaluation after their return to their home 
communities. 

5. Maintenance of adequate records in both state and local selecting 
agency offices. 

6. Research for the purpose of improving selection methods. 

During the year the office of the Supervisor of Selection was engaged in* 

Conferences with Amy and technical service officials 20 

Conference with groups of local selecting agents 30 

Visits to local selecting agents 112 

Visits to camps................. 32 

Conferences in Public Welfare District Offices 19 

Visits to Enrollment and Reception Centers 8 

Conferences with State Employment Service Official*...... 4 

Fifteen-minute broadcasts. 9 

Conferences with probation and parole officials • 2 

Addresses to civic groups.......... •• 8 

Offers of employment investigated* •••• • 950 

The following statistics show the results of the four enrollments conducted 

during the yearj 

Selected Rejected Non-Reports Enrolled 

January 2,817 234 193 2,390 

April 2,909 235 264 2,410 

July 3,753 393 182 3,178 

October 2,624 279 346 1,999 

Total 12,103 1,141 985 9,977 

Enrollees in camp January 1, 1940**........ 8,179 

Enrolled during year. 9,977 

Discharged during year... .......11,276 

Enrollees in camp December 31, 1940. • 6,880 



Report for 1940 



Surplus Commodities Distribution 
John C. Stalker, Director 

For the past 6 years the department has sponsored the surplus commodities 
distribution program in Massachusetts through a state-wide W.P.A. project, 
but did not assume any responsibilities for its operation. However, on 
June 1, 1940 > the department took over active administration of the 
surplus commodity program within the Commonwealth. This was brought 
about by a requirement from the Surplus Marketing Administration tiiat 
the department assume administrative control of this program by reason 
of the fact that all commodities distributed to the Commonwealth were 
donated to the department and responsibility for the proper distribution 
within the Commonwealth rested with the department. 

The department employs a small group of employees to handle the adminis- 
trative functions of surplus commodities within the Commonwealth known 
as the "Surplus Commodities Division*. The department also sponsors a 
W.P.A. project which provides personnel for the operation of the direct 
distribution program, the stamp plan program, and the school lunch 
programs within the Commonwealth. The department is the designated agent 
of the Surplus Marketing Administration lor operation of the various 
surplus commodities programs operating within the Commonwealth, and as 
such operates the program under the rules and regulations of the Surplus 
Marketing Administration in the cities and towns. 

The department has supervision over the certification of persons eligible 
to receive surplus commodities in the cities and towns in the Commonwealth, 
and may, at its discretion, withhold the distribution of surplus commodi- 
ties to #ny city or town not conducting the program in accordance with 
the requirements issued by the department based on regulations from 
the Surplus Marketing Administration. 



-2- 



The cities and towns are required to contribute their proportionate 
share of the necessary costs of administration in connection with the 
commodity distribution programs. They are required, also, to provide 
funds for the purchase of any supplies or equipment needed to conduct 
this work. The 7¥ork Projects Administration supplies funds for per- 
sonnel to carry out the operation of the program in the local communities; 
this personnel having the accounting and physical handling of the 
commodities allocated, but have nothing to do with the administration 
of the program. 

The department operates 29 warehouses and 283 distribution eenters in 224 
cities and towns, and services 119 towns by truck under the door-to-door 
system. The department also operates 20 stamp plan offices in 11 cities 
and towns, and donated commodities to -4-07 schools in 213 cities and 
towns. 

A warehouse is a carload-lot receiving point, and services approximately 
10 to 15 towns located in close proximity to the warehouse. It is also 
the point from which trucks handling delivery to small towns under 
the door-to-door system make deliveries to certified recipients on a 
semi-monthly basis. A distribution center is a location in a community 
at which certified recipients call weekly to receive their allocation 
of commodities. General distribution carried on through the above 
outlets assured 180,000 needy families of food in good condition and 
in quantities that they could carry, as commodities were received 
weekly by recipients. 

During the year, there were 41 different kinds of commodities available 
at the various warehouses and distribution centers as follows: 



apples-fresh 
beans-pea-dried 
beets-fresh 
butter 

beans-string 

cabbage-fresh 

carrots-fresh 



13,931,587 pounds 



1,669,916 



34^,840 
1,594,398 




2,083,240 



-3- 

celery 
cereal wheat 
cheese 
corn meal 
eggs 

fish-frozen 

flour-graham 

flour-wheat 

fruit-canned 

grapefruit-fresh 

grapefruit Juice-canned 

milk-evaporated-canned 

milk-dried 

milk-fluid 

oranges 

peaches-dried 

pears-fresh 

potatoes-sweet 

potatoes-white 

prunes 

raisins 

rice 

tomatoes-fresh 
vegetables-canned 
rolled oats 
peaches-canned 
lard 

squash-fresh 
pork- salt 
pecans-shelled 
Im 
bacon 

peaches-fresh 
loganberries-canned 



126,408 pounds 
2,317,453 
261,626 
5,665,668 
6,376, 813 
1,069,705*" 
7,080,0^6 
12,535,886 
1,122,856 
2,121,406 
529,256 
829,293 
27,165 
45,757,079 
11,062,018 
525 

1,115,690 
130 

13,707,667 
3,707,510 
5,726,051 
1,608,716 
3,194,343 

1,308,694 
1,498,628 

237,213 
3,961,900 
143,370 
709,313 
36,391 
1,193,462 
1,549,940 
441,222 
35.391 



Total 
Amount 

Clothing 3,042,582 pieces 
Blankets 96,119 

Comforters 44,227 



161,140,945 pounds 110,691,820. 



Value 

% 2,412,670. 
324,186. 
110,430. 



Total y 2,847.286, 

The school lunch program has greatly expanded during the year. Existing home 
conditions and the uncertainty of living standards give cause for a full 
appraisal of the social and health benefits resulting from the use of 
surplus commodities for school lunches. Starting the year, this section 
was allocating to 201 schools with 18,693 children serving school lunches; 
whereas at the end of the year this had increased to 407 schools serving 
48,018 children. 



-4- 

All school lunch programs received 2, 913 #913 pounds of food valued at 
$262,043 • 55 during the calendar year. Interest in the school lunch program 
and recognition of its value can be attributed to the cooperation of the new 
ly organized Massachusetts State-wide School Lunch Advisory Committee by 
their enlisting the support of civic, private charitable, religious, and 
educational groups in promoting this program. 

The food stamp plan was adopted in Springfield on February 2} 1h Is was the 
first city to operate under the new program of distributing surplus foods. 
As the fiscal year ended, 10 cities and 1 town had adopted this program of 
distribution, serving approximately 61,950 families, and issued free blue 
stamps for commodities valued at $1, 085, 629. 

During the year 1940, there were 1,647,201 containers sold, representing 
a value of $34,270.47, received in payments for sales. 

As the W.P.A. projects are approved for the year starting on July 1, there 
were two projects in force during the period of this report. Work Project 
#16253-Supp. 1 up to June 30, 1940, had a Federal appropriation of 
11,439,822, and a sponsors 1 appropriation of $640,200; all non-labor being 
paid from the Sponsors' Fund. This project was approved for a total of 
1637 persons. For the year starting July 1, 1940, Work Project #21639 had 
a Federal appropriation of $1,542,854 and a sponsors 1 appropriation of 
$783,481, all non-labor except for $3,000 being paid from the Sponsors' 
Fund. This project was approved for a total of 1848 persons. The maximum 
number of persons paid during this period was 2053 and the minimum 1258. 
This fluctuation was caused by the amount of commodities distributed. Up 
to June 1, 1940, both the Sponsors' and W.P.A. funds were handled through 
the United States Treasury. At that time the sponsors' money was 
transferred to a trust fund under the trusteeship of the Commissioner of 
Public Welfare. The personnel paid from the Sponsors' Fund is on the 

HI 



administrative staff with one or tno persons in each staap office 
to handle the stamp funds. 

The following charts presented herewith show the trend of the 
activities monthly, as described in the above paragraphs: 
Table 1 Value of food distributed to general 

recipients 

2 Value of clothing distributed 

3 (a) Value of food distributed 

per family- 
CD) Quantity of food distributed 
per family 

4 (a) Quantity of food, by pounds, 

distributed to general re- 
cipients 

(b) Quantity of clothiiig distributed 

by pieces 

5 Quantity of cloth issued to sewing projects 

6 Quantity of raw cotton issued to comforter 

projects 

7 Value and quantity o: containers sold 

8 Caseload variations I 

(a) Receiving food commodities 

(b) Under staap plan 

SEE CHAETS IE COMMISSIONER' S OFFICE 



DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP 
Miss Marion A, Joyce , Director 



Before reporting on the various activities of the division 
which have been carried on as usual during the past year, I should 
like to call attention to three unusual developments. 



OFFICE ARRANGEMENTS 

One marked Improvement in the office arrangements was made 
possible in the year just ended by the decentralization of the 
Division of Aid and Relief. The latter' s need of less space in 
the State House released Rooms 37 and 38 for the use of the Division 
of Child Guardianship, Thus at long last it was possible to discon- 
tinue the use of a small inner room for the reception of children, 
and to have Room 37 with windows above the street level, a fireplace, 
a good closet with a washbowl, adequate floor space, and a toilet 
directly across the hall, for the use of new children arriving daily 
in our oare and others coming to the office on various occasions* 
The Christmas Tree and decorations, with presents for all children 
coming in over a period of a fortnight (provided by the proceeds of 
the annual food sale conducted by the employees) as well as more 
permanent large toys and a radio given by members of the Child Welfare 
Committee of the Massachusetts Civic League, seemed much more attractive 
and enjoyed in the new room - where there is space, daylight and fresh 
air. Room 38, by a most economical arrangement of desks, took in 
the staff group covering children between the ages of three airi twelve. 
It accommodates 22 workers formerly in the same room with the staff 
serving older girls. The 27 people remaining in the original room 
still seem so crowded that it is difficult to imagine how so many 
others once shared the space. 

Similar problems to the two thus happily solved remain with 
us. All the space allowed for the staff is seriously overcrowded 
and much of it poorly lighted. The worst situation of all exists 
in the clothing room, still operating in its oubby-hole under the 
stairs, although the department has ma&d insistent requests for 
better accommodations. The doctor's office is dark and sooty. 
Privacy for supervisors, interviewing space other than benches in the 
halls, and conference space are still non-existent. 

SURVEY OF THE DIVISION 

In Commissioner Armstrong's final report to the Governor 
in October, 1939 he urged that a study of the Division of Child 
Guardianship be made. During this past year, Commissioner Rotch 
feeling the same need, money was obtained from The Mason Fund (there 
being no state funds available) and the services of Miss Abigail F. 
Browne 11, recommended by the Children's Bureau, were secured. 



SI 



2 



In a few months* time Miss Brownell analyzed the responsibilities of 
the division and the adequacy of its resources, and submitted a re- 
port of her findings with recommendations to the Commissioner. A 
brief statement summarizing her report was requested by the Advisory 
Board of the department and prepared by Miss Brownell. It reads 
as follows. 

QUOTE SURVEY REPORT 



THE COMMONWEALTH OF MASSACHUSETTS 
DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE 



THE HEEDS OF 
THE DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP 



A BRIEF SUMMARY OF THE FINDINGS OF 
A STUDY OF THE RESOURCES OF THE 
DIVISION IN RELATION TO THE VOLUME 
OF ITS WORK, DECEMBER 1, 1938-TO 
JULY 31, 1940- 

i>n i rnii 1 1 i r . nn nwnr i i 




— — — 



THE WORK OF THE DIVISION 

The Division is concerned with children in foster home: 
and with crippled children. Children in foster homes are 
there because they did not receive from their own families 
the day by day care they needed. Like all children they 
are dependent on adults, they cannot take care of them- 
selves; but unlike most children they have to depend on 
strangers for their care, they do not get it from their 
parents or other relatives. To some of these children the 
Division itself gives foster home care, while it licenses 
and regulates the care given to others by individuals and 
social agencies. Many crippled children need social serv- 
ice to supplement medical attention, the special services 
of the Department of Education, and the care their parents 
are able to give, because of tie difficulties inherent in 
their condition. The Commonwealth of Massachusetts under- 
takes to fulfill its obligations to children in foster 
homes and to crippled children through the Division of 
Child Guardianship. The work of the Division affects 
27 COO children in the course of a year. For 22,000 the 
question of foster care is involved, while 5.000 are 
crippled 

Tie study, of which this report is a summary, was 
made to determine the adequacy of the resources of the 
Division for the responsibilities assigned to it. Does 
the Commonwealth contribute enough money to make 
possible the provision of good foster care for the Div- 
ision's children, the regulation of foster care for 
other children, and social services for crippled child- 
ren? In the consideration of this question, changes in 
administration for the purpose of greater efficiency were 
taken into account. The changes recommended in the study 
m no way diminish the needs which are set forth in this 
summary. On the contrary the changes cannot be made un- 
til the needs are met, until the division has the re- 
sources required for the responsibilities placed upon it. 

A few facts give the volume of work. The Division has 
over 8,200 children in its care, 75^ of them living in 
foster homes, with board, clothing, and medical care pro- 
vided through state funds, the others being in working, 
-^ree or adoption homes, while a few are in hospitals and 
other institutions. 



rt- to 

rr - 





a 


- 














jv 

H* 












Cw 




© 
























3 


o 


























* — s 




(0 




O 


















uu 











rt) 


p 


"b 




< 




C—i. — ■ 


CD 






. . 
10 


H 




Pi 


*1 






CD -J 


O 


— i • 


1-3 


— 




3* 


Q 


"si 


3 Oj M 




CO 


rt) 


rt- 




CO 


CO 




\ 








pa 






Cn 








— r™l 






rjr 






'_j 






rt- p 


Ci 




O 


Op 







^ 




CO po 


p5 






Qi 


Qj 




3* rt 






t"b 






















CO 
















CJ1 




p3 O 




r - * u 


CD* 






CD 






H 


3* 




o 


rt) 








cD 






CD 




— 


Q 




O 


H- 




rt 


— 










pr H* 




CO 








1 f 


H* P 


l—l 












O 


3 


H« O 


Q 


^* 




Qa 






< CO 


0, 













3 "J 




O 










u 




H* r+ 


-i 
























CD 


L-t 





CO 


CD 




co 









33 




CO h-*- 




OS 










H* rt 











-j 








Q 


CO 


c+ 










O ^ 






o 





H- 




1 


















3 H 






t""b 


rt- T5 






Q 






\J 




CO 


O 




- 


S 




c"t- 




"d 






71 


CD 


— t* 












71 


P 




cd 


CO 






~* 


'3 


V 




CO 








l— ^ 




CD 






(0 


CD 




\J w 




LJ. 








CD 





O 


M 03 








-J 


a 










JD 


O 








CO 


Ufa 








< 












Cw 1 










c+ 


co p <3 










O 




<- (U 




Q ^ 


UJ 






03 







rt 






H* 


o 








CO 


7) J— 1 
















O 






rt) 


lj. 




CO 




rn 

err ^ 















H- -1 






,)C 




1— 1 




*^ 


05 


-J- O 




O 


















a 








^ =3 




— < 




CD 




Q 


H- 


CD 






P 


1 

















Qa 







> 3 


P 




P 3 




CD 
















CO 

















3 








CD 3 




Q 









CO 


fa rt 


CO 




Q 


P 






CD 




_ j c - t- 






















3 


1— ' 




CO 3 








CO 









CO 


GO CD 









7= 


H- 






^ , 


LJ. /-i 
P* -J 















rt- 











CO 









-J ~ 




^. 




Q 




■w 












rt 












rt 




CD 








05 




rt 


rt> 


CD 




O i 


CD 














O 








— 


a 




Ij CD 


CO 






(D 




m 






CO 


CD 







— 






_o 



















^ 71 








CO 


cr 




CD C 


^» 


(D —I 








j. 























CD 






j-u 











• 






















Qj 






w" 












Q 


£Z 








• CD 




CD 








, 




Ly 






























_ 










CD 




(D 7^ 


























— 
































rt) 




















7; 


O 





CD 






CD 






- 


CD 
















CO 








— . 
































LJ. 


lj. 






71 
















^ 
•< 










CO 






CD 


(J 




(D 






H 3 







CO 












1 




c+ 
















T" 








Q 








3* 










CD 


































CO 






















-1 



















5e 


-3 


CO 


rt- 








^5 71 




CO 


^« 


— 




O" 





^ 3 


P 




rt 


3* 




— 




rt n 




pa 


»— 1 









3* rr 


O O 


-. 




P 


CD 


CD 




(D 


7) ""J 


CO 


*" ^ 




rn 








1 rt- 




►-b 










1 — - (Tl 




CD 


O 




CD 


rt- 


M M 


K 




(Tl 


*+> 


•"b 


CO 


CD C 


CO 




O 






CO 




rt 


a< a, 


CD 





"1 




O 


CD 


CO 


* 














Oj) 






rr 




(-<• 


CO 


_ 










OS 










CD CD 


CO 


M- 




CO 


rt 


CD 


_ k. 






* 






— 

►J 








-1 


H 






CD 




•■ - 






Q 


0. 




P3 


" 






-5 CD 


Qi 


< 


3 


-s 


rt 


{J — > 






a 


rt 
\v 




C*" 








CD P 


T 





O 






C r+ 






O 










LJ 


rr 


CO 


(tl 


CO 


rt 


"3 














CD 


C+ 




r^ 




-3 tr 


3 


rt 




P 


— 






"3 — Q 






~ "* 






CO 




O CD 




H- 


— 


-J 








rt y> "r^ 








rt 


xi 











(ft 


O 


CD 





*~h CD 






J* 












S3 


CO 




p 


j£ 


3 




— ' -v 




— . » W 







O 


_ 



CD 






H- < 


O 


rt 




c+ 








r - * -J 










— . 


C~t" 




CT H- 






V— j 


CO 


29 


■ t 












— < 















P 










O CD 






c+ 


O 




f * 


< 


cd rr 


o 










w 












3 


O 


(0 


3 CD 





3 




7: 




\J 


* jy 






rf\ 


CO* 


»•* 








co 


M> CJ 


0) 


O 


rt> 


rt 


'fl 


77 ^ 








CD 




2^ 




Q 


CD rt- 


O n- 


rt 


t-b 




rr 










CO 








O 




— 




H- 




rt) 




CD 






rt 




rt 






•"^ 




• O 


3 


rt 


3 


3 


rt 




^ 




CT U 










O 




co 







O 










i— J I— J 




O 








- 




O "S 


rt 


J? 




CD 


, , 














'A 




r 4 " 




O CD 


(0 


M 09 








Q 




- 




CD 






73 








rt) 








CD 


Z- 
















CD CD 


P r+ 


-J 







k— 1 





QD H* 




O 






pa 


\j 




r*- 




t- 1 H- 


o 


rt 


rt 


P 




O CO 




T O 


53 






13 




O 


O H- 


3 


aft 


rt> 


O 


O 






1— k 


CO CO 








"H 







< ci- 


CO CD 




p. 




CD 


— 






q CD 


rt 




CD 


*2 


■ 




te 


CD 


o 




3 


g 


O, 


















Q 


-i rt- 


~s t-<5 






P 


CD 








03 rt 






_ 


CO 


w* 




(— 1 p 


< 




Pi 


rs 


3 


LJ. 




j! 


CD 1 "TT 


L— 1 











O 


rr 


H* 1 


rt 





rt) 


r 




Mi f/1 




O 




CD 










P CD 


Q 




1— ' 








< '71 












" 




Tj 


^ CO 


O n- 





H- 


•d 






M" >j3 


CO 


IT* 















CD 


CO 3" 




3 









^ w 






trt" 


CO 




C7*" 






O. rv 


H- 


H- 


X! 


CO 




L^ 






3 H* O 




CD 






CO 





r+ CO 




c 


CO 






^ s» • 






r ■> 




■0 

Ui 


CD 


r+ 


r> 


CO 


O 


rt 


2 


H- 


CD 


H» 






CD 


CD 


_ 
O 


~! 








rt- fj=. 




P 


3 


c 




3 












CD 


_ 
O 





rt* 


p LJ. 


5 


?r 


rt 


(-> 


C Or 








^. 
■< 






rt- 






•-+> < 


1 ^ 







rt) 


i-j- 




^ *^ 




O « 


w 








r-r< 


rt 












< 






_ 


O 




O 




rt 






•d • 






rt 










O ^ 




— 1 






Oj 


H' 










CO 






\? 


lj CO 3* 




CD 






/Vr« 

Uv 


-3 
=3 


co rr 


l-l 


3* 







H- 






CD 


O 71 O 






CD 


00 





O 


CD 


CD H 


(5 






O 








UL =1 












O 


"3 














3 CD 


^ 






^3 


3 






CO 


T 


CD 


CD 


P 








1 




h- ' 


H- 


O 


O 




CO 


CJ 
















H 1 


O 


3 


T( 








1 


CO 






1 










H 




1 












1 











O 


ft 




3 


rt 




S « 







O 


1* 


5 


09 















t+ 


c 




O 


O 







f* 


a 


H| 







P 


91 


3 










3" 


M 




3 






-< -J 


r> 









-I 


rt- 


rt- 












CD 


P 




r»- 


rt 







r-t- 


P 


rt 







'j 


H> 


rt- 










1 


rt- 






P 










3* 







a 


O 














H- 


H 




— 




3 rt 




s 





X 






3 





> 




co 


4* 


03 











1 


P 


* 







-3 







CO 




3 


— 


p 


OJ 


OP 




CD 


CO 







?r 




3 


CO 





O 






d 




CD 





4^ 


CD 


3 




1 


O 


3 







rt 


rt 


— 







03 





S3 


1 


3" 




3 




CD 


CD 


— 




co 3 


f* 


3* 


P 


a 




3* 




1 


< 


CD 




H- 


O 


P 








rt 


CO 


> 


1— < 


•-b 


H- 


< 





3 


M» 







O 


3 


H- 




H> 


03 


)— 1 




03 H> 




«< 


•-b 


rt 





CO 


O 


O 


1 


H 




)-b 


CD 


a 


CO 


O 


a 





-1 3 








3 


a 





3 


a 




H- 




P 


CO 






O 






rt 


-Q 


P 










rt 




OP 










CO 


p 








3 


O 


C 


< 


5: 





H- 


P 










CD 




ft 


p 


rj 


1— 1 


•d 


3 


03 




rt> 


j 







— 


-3 









a 


H- 




3 


■d 


CO 


rt- 




3 


O 


3 


1 


"1 


O 


rt 


•d 


-b 


< 





CO 


CD 


o* 


a 


CD 





(6 


H- 




P 




P 





•-b 


O 




O 





•-b 


CO 


3^ 







s 




a 


3 




-! 


- 


OP 








H- 


•1 


1 




CO 




p 




< 


03 




rt 


33 










3 


P 


(5 


O 







— 




,_j 




3 


LJ. 




03 


O 


-3 


• 






P 




33 


P 











P 


a 


a 


CO 


(— 1 


3 




•d 









a 


01 


■■j 


rt 


P 




-J 


CD 


a 


p- 




H- 


p 


0. 


rt 








**) 





3 







-1 


3* 




1 




3 


< 


3 


1 






H- 


—1 








cr 




3 







3 


CD 


cr k 




OP 


etc 


3 








3 




a 




co 




-j 











CD 




a 




CD 


co 




P 






CO 





rt 


33 


CO 


t-b 


rt 


< 


1 


CD 


>— < 




rt- 







1 


rt 


9 




CO 




P 


3- 











CD 


3 


Q 


p 




< 






H- 


P 


c 












1 


LJ. 









3 


i— 1 


CD 


O 




3^ 


O 









rt 


rt 









CO 


3* 


c 


H* 


CD 


CO 








b 


3 











H- 





3 


a 




H- 


CO 


3 


CO 


• 


>— *> 


^ 




g 


CO 






C 


CD 


P 




O 





CO 


H 


CD 


< 






O 


3 









O 




"i 




)— 1 


O 





•d 


rt 


- 


a 


CD 


.-J 




CO 


CD 




CO 


1 


^3 


r> 


rt 






rt 


T 







-3 




CO 


p 




rt- 













a- 







P 






3 


a 







r^- 


a 




O 


O 






O 


rt 




3 d 


3 










— 


- * 


3 




M- 








"3 




to 





3* 







P 


O 




a 











09 


M 

















R.. 


P 


H- 


C 






3 




O 




P 


H- 






< 






< 


CO 


-1 


-J 


3 


3 


•d 




rt 




P 




rt- 


O 




P 


O 




3 








ft 


H- 


LJ. 


rt 


t— ■ 


d 






3 




CD 


2 






T 







a 




3 


3 


3 




P 




O 









a 






H- 


^* 













Ov 


09 


O 


3 


O 


3* 


-b 








CO 




1—' 








'-!) 


P 


O 


CO 




•-b 


CO 


3 


w. 


rt 


H» 






CD 




%J. 


I- 1 - 




>-ti 




CO 












H- 


I-" 




r 




P 


CO 






3 




O 















rt 




>— ' 


a 


1 


rt 




CO 






CD 






CO 


3 


CO 













a 


-j 


O 


O 






C/j 




P 


I— 1 




rt 






3* 






3 


>-b 


-i 





3 








CO 




"S 


H- 







•d 


H- 


b 










rt 





3 










P 


■3 




CD 


O 




-J 





3 


=s 


p 









3 






P 




a 


rt- 






CD 









< 




CO 


6" 


O 


3 






, ^ 


1 










Oc 


3 




3* 


■d 





~i 







3 









on 
















CO 




O 


h- 1 


CO 


Ol 


CO 


K 




H- 


CO 


1 


— 






rt- 


H 




< 


H- 




3 





rt 









rt 


3 


XI 





— ' 













CD 


3 









W- 


P 









< 








P 




CD 








OP 




CO 




09 






CO 





O 





LJ. 


p 







"1 














3- 


33 


g 










t-b 


3 


■d 


3* 




CO 






cr 






p 


b 


rt 


O 




P 


•d 


< 




< 


-d 














-3 










3 


ca 


cl- 


P 









1— 1 


3 






C 






CD 






P 

rt 


suo 


rt 


1 


ient! 


"3 

rt 


i 





s ti- 




on th 



CT 


cr 


rt 


O 






~> 












s 





rt 


33 












H- 


P 


03 







CO 


3- 








H- 


p 


H- 














3 




3 




3 


4i 











P 














P 


P 




CO 











CO 








rt 


3 


CO 





































M- 


O 




3 








CO 






O 


H 








JO 






O 


rt 


M "3 


> 




H- 





rt 


rt 


t-b 






rt 


H> 








3 




W- 


t—l 











O 













rt 










CT 


CO 




a 




< 










rt 























rt 


CO 










•-b 


cr 






H- 






3 


















rt 




a 












3 




-s 


CO 


1 




CO 




3 


a 





p 






09 








P 









re 


re 


c 


3" 







a 


H- 




rt 


P 


3 








a 




3 










cr- 





rt 


p 




H 


— 1 




■d 














P 








re 




CO 




cr 







3: 




CO 


OP 





H- 






H- 


3 






r-l- 





Jc 





3 


a 


m 


O 




h-> 




M 


c 






•d 




si 


e 




H- 


< 








C 







3 


p. 


p 






-j 


rJ» . 


«-» 




3 


rt 





rt 


CO 




°H 










*1 







0* 


H- 


O 




n- 











rt 


m 






rt 


09 





<^ 




-s 


co 


r«> 








U). 









m 




rt 





M 



















a 


3 







a 





rt 















cr 




CO 






CO 




< 





«<; 


CO 









O 


-« 


3 







P 











rt 





•-b 













rt 








H- 


cr 


O 


3 




p 




p 


•-b 





-JO 




CO 







b 


rt 




3 


o 


r> 


re 













-b 


m 


1 


2/2 






3* 




09 




OS 


















< 







P 









rt 










t- 1 


a 




rt 


m 


09 


< 




H- 








•-b 








re 




H» 






3 


J> 


C 




rt 







3 







u- 










3 


rt 


rt 





r~ 


i— ' 

















H 






to 




H- 




O 




m 


P 








rt 




3 












re 




rt 


-s 








rt 


CO 






LJ. 


cr 




rt 












CO 





>-b 


O 




H- 









< 









O 















S 


cc 


O 




O 













t-b 






3 




O 




t— • 


K 


-< 






O 


-3 


3 


















t-b 





•-b 








CO 


3 




OP 


O 




3 


rt 






CO 








H- 


S 


— 1 


O 


rt 





O 




t-b 




P 


3* 










rt 


rt 


L_J 


9 


3. 


>-b 


P 






H- 






H- 















co 


1— ' 




m 




3 


rt 


3 























rt 




c 




>-b 




O 






O 




rt 


cr 












P 


rt 




CO 





P 




>-b 


>-b 


"3 







3 










•d 


3 






— 1 


CO 




rt 


P 


O 








a 










s 










cr 


rt 


a 




g 


CD 







P 


09 

























CO 





M- 


rt 


-s 




3 













CO 


3 


*J 








rt 


a 


t- 1 
H- 


er 


CO 




ce 


rt 










en 


■79 



CO 


an 




O 











3 






>-b 










rt 


3 


•d 


a 




P 


P 


< 


CO 












O 
























rt 






b 


P 




-b 


"3 










P 





3 


rt 









CO 







3 
















•d 


a 


CO 


3- 






CO 




O 





CO 







H 










■d 


CO 


H- 







O 




O 


3 


CO 








CD 










"j 




cr 






P 







■I 




rt 




LJ. 


CO 













rt 








3 


ulcl 






be- 


hat 




ld- 


CO 
1 










■d 

1 


P 
rt 


h- 1 

1 


ork 





rt 3 
y co 
P 

H 1 

01 

1 ft 

9 3" 
3 » 

O 

0) f% 
H- ►*> 

a h- 

H- 

H CD 

p >■ 
1 

s 

C* 3 

H- 

o 

ft 3" 

3 

« 

Cfl o 

CD c 



■ 



* s 

3* 3- 3* 

(6 O O 

3 "J 

O ft 



-3 

o 

o 



Cfl 



O P 
"S 3 

o 

cr cd 
p> 

cr d 
o 



O ft 

=r 3" 
m- 



a a 

1 3" 

(D 
3 



H 
3" Cfl 



P ft 
3" 



(0 

rt 
3" 33 



CD 



cr a 



c = 

H 1 Cfl Cfl 
a 3 CD 

CB v. 

cr 

(I) i- s 



CD 
3 

OP 
3 O 
3 H" 

a 3 

CD CTP 
1 

ft 
2 

CD 

CD ft 



"3 3 

"3 

1 C 
~i 

S P 
3" T 

O << 

ft C 

3" 3 

CD CD 
-5 

CD P3 



I— UP 

a 

1 H- 

CD 3 
3 



o g a 

M ft 

O {X p 

ft H- ft 

3* 

M- 33 

3 



ID 



CD 3 

3 3 

P3 T 
C 

t- ft- 

H- 3* 

3 CD 
(TO 



CD - 

3 I 



3- 3 

CD 33 



03 CD 

3 

> 

3 

3 

CD 
X 



ft- 
Ef 

CD 

a < 

CD CD 
P 3 
"J 

VS ft 
>• 3* 

CD 



X - 



Cfl ft 
ft- 3 



3 



P 

< P 

CD 



ft 



**) ft 





CD CD 

C5 

3 -d cr 

h* O << 

a p 
■j P 

- — 3" 
3 - C 
C 

Cfl 
CD 



CO 



p p 
o 

3 ?r 

C H- 
-S 3 

cfl TP 

CD - 

*3 

^ CD 
X 

p o 

CD 



CD rt 
H 

-S CD 

CD Cfl 
Cfl 

ft 1-15 
o 

ft -J 

cd cr 

V- p 

ft- 
o 3- 

ft 3 

CD OP 
3 

ft- 
3" 
CD 



3* ft 
33 rt 
ft CD 
a -3 



CD 



Cn S p 

K << 
ff, e+ 

H 3r -j 

ft- O 

ft C 

>-t> tr a 

O CD - 
- 

3 3" 

3 CD p 

CD O < 

H CD CD 
rt Cfl 

3" Cfl 33 
CD p 
"3 -3 



o 
< 

CD 
-5 

O 

o 
a 

CD 
d 

O 

>-b 

H- 

n 

CD 
Cfl 



a 

T 

CD 
3 

C5 

o 

3 

CD 

3 



- 

3 P 
-3 

rt CD 

CD ft 
3* 
cr cd 
p << 

Cfl 

CD P 

3 -J 

CD CD 
3 

ft "J 

CD 

O C5 

t-f, CD 



ft- < 
3" CD 
CD a 



P 
•3 
T) 
1 
O 
■3 



Cfl Cfl 
ft P 

P H- 



3 

ft- 



C 

Cfl 
CD 

a 



CO 



■ 3 
O 

■ "3 

- CD 
P 
Cfl 

a. M 

P OJ 

3 s^. 
a 

CT ft 

CD 3" 

OP CD 
H 

3 cr 

3 3 

h a 

3 TP 

UP CD 
rt 

3 - 
P 

a 3 

CD CD 
CD 

s a 

K co 

ft 

3* ft 

C 

ft 

3- cr 

CD CD 

< CO 

CD 3 

-s cr 

«< 1 



f-b ft 

1 3- 

O P 

3 3 



O 
P 

CD 

a 

CO 

ft 
p 
*-b 
>-b 



en 



P 
o 

sr cfl cd 



3 

CD 
C5 
CD 
CO 
CO 

p 
<< 

CO • 

ft 
p 

i -r> o 

ft o 
h- O 
3 -S 

CD T 
- CD 

O 



P CD 
3 3 



a 

o 



p 

* (TP 



■3 

P ft 
<< 

CD S 

"s 3" 

Cfl p 



ft 
3" 

CD 
«< 



3* 3 

CD ft H CD 
3T Cfl CD 

•3 cd a 

CD 
CO 
CD 
3 



•-b 

O 



ft- 
CD 
3 

!-b 
o 



CD 

■-b ft 

«3 ET 

CD CD 

ft C 

H- < 
CD 

CD "S 

I I 



o 
ft 
3* 

CD 
1 
Cfl 



t-b 

o 

1 CO 

ft- 

ft CD 
3* -1 



-3 

CD o 

TP -13 
3 

t- 1 ft 

P 3T 

ft CD 



^03 



3 

TP 



P 

a 
a 

(TP CD 

h- a 
< 

CD Cfl 
3 3 
>3 

cr cd 
< 

H- 
CO 

o 



ft- 
3" 
P 
ft 

O 
"b 

P 
3 

P 
Cfl 
Cfl 
H- 
Cfl 

ft 
p 

3 



P 

>-b 

"3 

CD 

a 



"-b H 

O 3" 

Cfl CD 
ft 

CD * 

"J O 
1 

3" K 

O 

3 O 
CD i-ij 

h- 

P H- 

1 o 

CD CD 
3 

Jc Cfl 
H- H- 
< 3 
CD TP 
3 - 

cr i 
«< 

(TP 
O 3 
ft H 
3" P 
CD rt 
T H- 
Cfl 3 

(TP 
p - 
3 P 

a 3 

a 

rt 

cr co 
CD c 
•3 

S CD 
O 1 

-J < 



-b i 

H- CD 
3 3 



3- 

O 
3 

CD 
Cfl 



3 cr 



3 

TP 



►-b Cfl 

o 

Cfl "3 

ft O 

CD Cfl 

"5 Cfl 



P CD 
1 CD 
CD "3 

■3 
P 

3* CD 



Cfl * 



00 TP 

- C 

tO CD 
O 



rt « 



o 

3S 3 

CD CD 

"-b t-b 

P H- 

T 3 

cd a 



CD iTP 
P 



o 

3 

ft- 
-. 

P 

Cfl Cfl 

ft 



3- cr 
o t- 1 

3 CD 



3! 

< -J 

CD 5T 

CD 

C3 1 

p Cfl 
Cfl 
CD 



S CD 



o 

P "3 

a m 

cn p 
o 

O CD 



Cfl 



Cfl O O CD 
W) Cfl 



3 

c+ 
ft 3" 
3" CD 
CD 



O 

3" > 

h- 3 

t— 1 CD 

a 1 

1 H- 

CD fi 



o 

p p 3 

a 3 "3 

a cd 

a < 

O H- 



o 



3 ff 3T < 

P 3" CD 
^ CD i— 1 Cfl 

cT * £ 

3 O ft-09 
O 1 3* 
S 5C CD O 
CD *< 3* 
3"1 H- 



m. TP 3 



* ti a 

3* CD 1 

«5 o a CD 

h* 3 
-j Cfl w 

Cfl <D 3 



f> M. 

3" ■ 

CD 

3 

P 

< 75 

co 33 
- 



i- 1 a 

CD 1 

C5 CD 

ft 3 



< 

i-b CD 



a 



3 P W- H- 



a 
1 



o 

3" 

a 
1 



CD 3 
"3 ft 
O 



• CD 

n 

H ft 

3T Cfl 

CD 

1 P 

CD 

-3 

H- CD 

Cfl S 

3 

3 P 
O 3 

CD 

ft 3 

M- ft 

3 

CD 3T 
O 

P 3 

h- 1 CD 
H 

O P 

5 3 

cd a 
a 

-3 

O P 

-1 o 

CD 

M, CO 

o 

Cfl p 
ft 

CD O 
-3 3 



Cfl 3 
Cfl 

3 - 

CD 

S 3 
O 

P 3 

3 cd 

a cn 

a cn 

H- o 
t-b 

i-ij rt 

O p 



o ^ 
1 

*-b 

3 

a -. 

H- CD 
3 

TP CD 
H- 
Ct < 
Q 

■3 i= 
o 



CD 3 

-s P 

H-«< 
CD 

3 3- 

O P 

CD < 

- CD 

P ft- 

3 3" 

a " 



1 c 
P 3" 

«< H- 

a 
c-b -i 

O CD 

Cfl 3 
r- 

CD « 

-S 3" 
CD 

3" 3 
O 

3 ff 

CD 3* 

yi ~ 
«< 

P 

3 C5 

a o 

CO CD 

c 

■3 ff 

CD O 



3 


s 


C5 








-s 


TP 


ft 


cr 


H- 





•d 


ff 




ft- "e 


ff 


C 


33 





3" 


O 


3" 




CD 


P 








3 


f-b 





3" 




O O 


3" 


3 




3 


H- 


3 


H- 




t— 


"3 




3 


OP 




►1 







C 





a 


3 


H 




H 


O 




f-b 


a 




O 




ft 


3 






ft f- 1 







ft 


a 


a 


a 


3" 


> 


P 




CO 






3" 


H- 




i-3 


3- a 


-d 


*i 


CD 




fj 






3 


-3 


f-b 


C 


CD 








ft 


c 


3T 









3 


a 


CD 


3 


f+i 




CD 





-3 


Cfl 









p 








'< 


el- 


P 


c 


3 


pc 


O 


H- 




-3 







g 




•d 


3 




O ^-• 


CO 


s' 


3 






^> 


"i 


3 






"3 


H- 


CO 





"3 


ff 


a 


>-b 






O 


rt 


H- 


CD 


3 


O 


P 


ri- 


< 


3 




1 


O 


H- 


►a 


>-b 3 








CD 




3 






-3 


Cfl 


se 


W- 






x -d 


ft 





H- H- 








■3 




"3 


P 


CD 




CD 


Cfl 


rf 


p 







v; 


p 


O 3 


p 




O 


I— 1 


^3 


O 




P 


CD 







3T 


3 


hf 






"3 


p 


3 




-b 


O 


CO 


3 


Cfl 


cn 


< 


fj 





a 


3 




P 


«<J 


• ff 




P 






Cfl 


CO 


H- 


CD 


rt 


CD 


CO 








P 


3 









3 


O 


ft 


ft 


H- 


3 


a 


P 


-3 




O 





CO 




a 






Cb 


a 






CD 


cr 


O 




cr 


<< 




O 


1— 1 




•-3 




O 








H- 


CD 


fj 


1— • 




P 








•-3 


H- 


H- 


P 


ft 


-s 




O 










CD 




•d 


H- 


3* 


f- 1 


1 





ff 


3 


rr 







ft 




a 


< 


3" 






-3 


Cfl 


3 


3 


H- 


3 


P 


OP 





| 




3" 






P 


O 


f-b 


P 


-! 


3- 


3 




a 


ft 


cr 









3 









— 


3 


P 


"S 


O 


CD 


P 


ff 





CO 


M 


3 


^3 








3 




3 


c 


CD 


"5 


rt 


•d 


a 


3 


3T 









' 


3 


a 




OP. 






CD 


CO 












H- 




rr 




3 


P 









s 


i 






g 


O 


H- 


rf 


< 


cn 




P 


c 


ft 


1— ' 





cn 


-3 





O 


p 


O 


•-b 


P 





P 






< 


3 




H- 


i-b 


Cfl 


Q 






•-b 


3 


1 




ft 






CO 


f-3 





H- 


>-b 


ft 






O 








a 


CD 


ct 


H- 





c 


H- 


^j- 




ff 


O 




H- 


ct 


3 


a 




rt 






3T 


O 





CD 


ft 





rt 


cn 


1 




O 


<< 


CO 






3r 


rt 


CD 


CD 


3 


3 


CO 


c 


-3 









O 









P 




CD 





f-b 






Cfl 




p 












f*> 


Cfl 







t— 1 








>-5 


cr 


t-b 


CD 




ft 




cr 




f*! 






f* 


p 


CO 




CD 





CD 


3 


O 


-3 






P 





•-3 


>-b 




P 




3 







X 


-5 


C5 


a 


-j 


< 


CD 









3T 


- 


O 




cr 








-3 


H- 


ft TP 




CD 




3 













"3 




"3 




•3 




CD 


"3 


H- 


CD 


ft 




O 






3 


1 


H- 


?r 





— 


P 


•3 




3 


•3 




ff 


3" 




CD 


rf 


3 


ft 













— 




O 




a 


H 


CD 




CD 




■d 


3T 


O 







3 




rf 


OP 




< 




H- 


CD 




f-b 


Cfl 




p 


? 




-3 


P 


ff 














ft 


a 


CO 





CD 




-5 




•d 


< 


*3 




CZ! 


P 










3 




CD 


"S 






rf 





fj 







O 


•d 




0Q 


«< 






"i 








Ct 




3 




H- 









P 


< 










CD 


3* 


< 


ft 


3T 







H- 


< 


"5 


3 


TP 










1 


O 




Cfl 






3" 


~S 




3 


CO 


P 





O 


P 





-3 







"-b 






K— 1 


O 


CD 


CD 




ft 




ft 


a 




3 




CO 






f-b 




>-b 


a 


CD 




CD 






P 







H- 


H- 


a 







S 


h-f 




O 






O 






O 









3 


N 





t— i 












1 


CD 


ft 




H- 




f-b 




O 


3 


ff 


P 





«< 


— 











3 


O 


< 


ft 






M- 


f-b 




r 


ff 


CO 








CO 




rt 








CD 




13 


Cfl 


>-b 




1 








H 








3" 






CO 


3 




C 


*1 


H- 




< 


3 


3 


© 










CD 






H- 


Cfl 




cr 


T 


C5 












T 











1— 1 




O 






1— 1 


1 












r* 







CO 








ft 




3 











CO 




1 








3 







- 3 - 



WHITE HOUSE CONFERENCE IMPLICATIONS FOR THE DIVISION 



After the 1940 White House Conference on Children in a 
Democracy held its meetings in Washington, Mr. Cheney C. Jones, 
the Governor's delegate, reported to the Governor on the Conference 
and made his recommendations for the follow-up in our Commonwealth by 
the state committee. It was pointed out that under the Social 
Services Section nothing more important could be selected as the goal 
in this Commonwealth than the strengthening of the division by securing 
for it the personnel, space and funds needed to carry on its work 
properly. 

Preliminary to securing these, publicity was felt essential. 
Accordingly, Mr. Jones requested the Director to prepare a concise 
statement about the work of the division which was published first in 
the 'New England Home for Little Wanderers Advocate* for September 1940. 
Jointly the White House Conference Committee for Massachusetts (the 
Massachusetts Child Council) and the Child Welfare Services financed 
reprints of this artiole for distribution at .the Massachusetts 
Conference of Social Work in November, 1940 and through various other 
channels throughout the year. The Child Welfare Committees of the 
Massachusetts Civic League and of the League of Women Voters gave 
copies of this article and copies of the summary of the Survey Report 
to their members in their campaigns for the support of the division's 
budget prepared for the incoming legislature. 

Furthermore, Mr. Jones through various contacts, Mr. Conant 
in arranging the district conferences of the Massachusetts Conference 
of Social Work, and the Child Council through its speakers* bureau, 
arranged many opportunities for members of the division* s staff to 
talk about its work to lay and professional groups all over the 
Commonwealth. 



The regular work of the division falls into two categories: 
care of the young wards of the Commonwealth, and help, diredt and indi- 
rect, to other children through several other functions established 
by law. f 

CHILDREN UNDER CARE 

A summary picture of the central work of the division can 
be seen through the following tables. 



U2t) 
co n> cd 

HOT 'J 
(->■ I — 1 D 

3 a 3 

O Pi 

ct n> 

CD 3 
Qj ct 



CD 
3 
ct 



rovjn -fr 
-vj^j ro 



I 1 I 



vjl 4=" 
rovji fo 
• • • 

v>i ro 02 



a o »d 
a -i 

a 4 c+ o 



& ct 
o cd 

(- 1 CO 
I-* c+ 
O PJ 
3 
ct 



02| 4=\>1 

ro oav>J 



i i i i 



»-3 v_n -p" 
o 02 o 

ct • • • 

m owovji 



o* 

CD 

o 

3 



vO CD 







55 


O h3 






M- O 








01 ct 




3 


o 4 




* o 


CD 


& r-> 


t— • H-» 






o 






4 3 








OT C 

■D g 


CO CO 


CD 


ct CO 


O 


p< cr 


P3 




• 


CD 


ct 








cd 




la 

H 


CD 

O p 






VO 


• C 






M 4 






O 


- H- 


P 






H 3 


TO 






vOiq 








VO cj) 








SO 


cr 




H 


ro 


o 






O OA 


'< 




4= 


oa ro 



m 

ro 
3 
P 

v_n 

Cq 

H 
cn 



o 
3 
3 

H" 
ct 

c+ 
CD 

P 

CD 

H 

H- 
3 

CD 
3 
ct 



fa 

ct 

3 
CD 
3 
ct 



OA 
V>J 



PO 
M 



VJ1 

ro 
o 

ro 

-F= 



■*= 



VJ1 
V>J 



02 

02 

o 



v_n 

vo 

ro 



vjj 



-f= 
ro 
oa. 

A3 
V>J 



•FO 

4=-^i 



MVjJ 

VJ1 OA 

rovo 



I H 



vjn vO 



vji O 

io 

VjJ OA 
V>1V>J 

H {= 

ro 
rovji 

CJN O 

VJ1 

VJI M 
vOVjJ 

ro 

4=TO 
V^JVjJ 



-vl OA 



VjJ 

4=02 

H 02 
OA 02 

M VO 

H •*=• 
-4 O 
H ro 



CD 

o 

CD 
H- 
<< 
CD 
P 

D • 

O 

• M 
H- 

t— 1 H-» 

VOvO 



i 
a 

OVJlj r < 

02 4=1 r» 

I O 

4 



a) 
o 



ro-vj! 

VO 02? 



h 1 ro? 

I 



I Hi 

| 
j 
■ 

ro-j> 

I 

f 



ro 02 i 
ro; 
vj4 ro? 



03 



>-3 
O 
c+ 
9J 



03 
O 

CO 



(-» 

CO 



O 
ct 
3) 



cd 
o 



4= 

O ro 
vo 



3 



o 
H 



HvOi 

vo ro 

-v| ON* 



HVJ1 
— «JVO 

H *f 



v>Jvn ! 
cjNro '. 

02 o ! 
M 02 

" • i 
ro t— 1 1 

^<8a 



o 
cn 



H 
ro 



»-3 
O 
ct 
5» 
M 



CD 
H 1 
H- 
3 

cd 
3 
ct 



O 4=1 










CSS 




; 


CD 


ro 




Cq 


- 




i— ' 


V>J (-J 




CD 


ro--J 


H 


O 


vo ro 


CD 


ct 






CD 


i 

! 




P 



P 



a 

CD 
T3 
CD 
3 
P 
CD 
3 
ct 



^3 Q 
O ^ 

H P 




CD 
P- 



CO 
CO 
CO 
CP 
P> 

t-t, 
*-i 
O 
B 

o 

CO 

*i 

CD 

c 

P 

(R 

c+ 
fcr 
<n 

«<$ 

CD 
CO 
►1 



o 

c+ 
CO 

CO 



3; g H 

trFp 
h 4 o 

CD H« H* 

co a < 
a" P h* 
O 
P 
ct 
CO 

p 

P 
o 



MHOOMMMM 
PPPPPPPp 



CD CD CD CD 
CO CD CO CO 



o ►a 



i i 



H 



I HP I OH 

H-» w vO -f~ 



Oft 
vO 



00 



m 

to -sj ro h v*j 

M VjJ I I O O^O O O 00 



H» M f- 1 w ro 

u> -^3 -s3 -P- W V>> vO vO 



00 
N> 
H 



1-3 
O 
c+ 
CD 



O ^ S5 
CD ff> CD 

H- £ H 

CD 





C 

<D 
P 



0) 

o 



VjJ 



to 



\-> O 
O MvO 



vO 



00 



00 VjJ 



VjJ 

•F- 



On On 

-p- I O 



CD CD 
HOP 
nO • P< 

VjJ H- 

vOHP 
- ft 



CD 

CD 



O tad 
c+ p a> 
p- »i o 

<D H* CD 
P H- 
ft <4 
0) 
Pi 



~ P 
H* O (D 

c+ O P 
CD I H 



CD 



O 
P- 
O P 
O 4 

p ft 

►i CD 

c+ 
O 



CD te) 

M> CD 

CD H* 
H 1 C H 
CD I- 1 CD 

1 Ct P- 
CD «• 
Pi 



I— 1 CD CD 
vO O P 
• Pi 
O H- 
H P 
- ft 



- 7 - 

Disposition of Neglected Children by the Courts 



mber of court notices received 1,384 

tal number of cases attended 2,074 

Coranitted to 

Department of Public V/elfare 300 

Department of Public Welfare and appealed 10 

Boards of Public Welfare 9 

Child Welfare Division, City of Boston 36 

Placed on File 46 

Discharged 14 

Dismissed 71 

Continued , 1129 

Continued and placed in Eome for Destitute Catholic Children 2 

Continued and placed in care of Department of Public Welfare 409 

Failed to appear 39 

Appealed from finding 9 



2,074 



Disposition of the Two Hundred Sixty-Six Cases of Neglect 

Pending December 1, 193? 

Discharged, Pending 
Permanent to Court Dec. 1, 1940 



Boys Girls Boys Girls Boys Girls Total 



ider 1 


Year i 


Df Age 


6 


1 


1 


Year of Age 


2 


2 


2 


Years 


of 


Age 


4 


3 


3 


Years 


of 


Age 


5 


3 


4 


Years 


of 


Age 


2 


4 


5 


Years 


of 


Age 


2 


2 


6 


Years 


of 


Age 


4 


4 


7 


Years 


of 


Age 


3 


3 


8 


Years 


of 


Age 


2 


3 


9 


Years 


of 


Age 


1 


3 


10 


Years 


of 


Age 


4 


2 


11 


Years 


of 


Age 




1 


12 


Years 


of 


Age 






13 


Years 


of 


Age 




1 


14 


Years 


of 


Age 




3 


15 


Years 


of 


Age 




1 



Totals 
Totals 



35 



36 



6 
5 
4 
4 
3 
4 
4 
3 
2 

5 
4 

2 

1 
1 



48 



1 

4 
5 

2 
2 

3 
1 

4 

5 
3 
2 

3 
2 
1 
1 
1 



40 



2 
4 

3 
2 
6 
3 
7 
4 
2 
6 
8 

3 
2 
2 
2 
1 



57 



1 

2 

3 
5 
7 
3 
5 
4 
6 

3 
3 
1 
4 
1 



50 



17 
19 

22 
21 
24 
17 
25 
21 
20 
21 

23 
10 
8 
6 
7 
5 



71 



88 



107 



Grand Total 



266 



SI 



►9 
CO 



O O ^ O O ^ 
H* H* CD O O 



CD CO H* 

B o \-> 
h* P" cd 

CD OD Pi 

co *i 
cd OQ ct 
p © o 
p< 

OD 

►o 

CD 
CP 



P P 

c+ CO 
H* P 
P 

e 

CD 
Pi 



•n a > 

H"P 



o 

CD 

*i 

CD 
O 

o 

CD 

►a 

CD 

•-i 
ct 

B 

CD 
P 
ct 

O 
»-b 

hj 
P 
cr 

o 



CD 
CD 

H 

CD 



O 
H 

O 

CD 
P 
P 

p 

►1 

«<1 



^ o a o h-) 

h- o o o 

H P P P 

CD P P P 

P ct ct ct 

^ «< 

•-3 H t-3 

4 4 »i 

CD CD CD 



P 
P 
H* 
P 

OH 




M M f t -1 t -1 

P P 5 

P P CO CD CD 
P 



a 
o 



co co 
ct c+ 
•4 ►* 



P P 



ct 
ct 

CD 
P 

c+ 
O 



05 Ui CO 
H* H* O O O 

co p p- p- p- 

HHOOO 

o o o 

WCCHHH 

o o 

o o o o o 
O O H *i H 
H H 

CO CD td 
M> H> O O O 
O OVjV)^ 
»i co co co 



QOQtdtdtdco cd 
o o o p 



CD CO • 




p<< «<J *<* 


^^4 4 


4 «< «5 


P P 


P P • 


o • 




CD CD 


I — ' 1 — • 1— * CD CO CO 




P P» 




CO CD CD • 




CO CO 


CO 


O CD 






CD P p . 


CD CD 




CD p • 


O *p 


O P • 


p.. 


P P P» • 




CO P 


• pp. 


*o* 


O »P • 


ct • 


ct • 


CD • 


p p 


• pp. 


CD 


B >P • 


• 


CD CO CD • 


P • 


p p 




H» CD 


3 CD • 


CD • 


P CD *P • 


P • 




• OP. 


Ct H 


H* CO • 


P • 


o p>p . 




O CD 


♦ O »P • 


CD 


ct 


ct • 


CD c+ CD • 


O • 


O >p 


. »p . 


CD P 


B p • 




CD CO • 


o . 


B tJ 


• CD • 


P 


CD P. 


CD • 


CD p M* 




CD 


• H* CD » 


Ct • 


P 


P • 


pop. 




H- CD 


• ct H» • 




ct. • 


CD • 


CD CD P» 


p.. 


Ct H» 


• CD • 


CO • 




►P . 


*P 


ct • 


CD 


• CD P . 


p • 


CO . . 


cd • 


CD CO • » 


B • 


CD P 


. p . 


CD • 


p • • 


P • 


P P • • 


CD • 


P 


. ct . . 


•P • 


CO • • 


p. 


P CD • • 


P • 


ct • 




CD • 


»p • • 


CD • 


CD >P • • 


ct • 




• CD • • 


P » 


a> . . 


p. 


P CD • • 




CO • 


• p . . 


P • 


P • • 




P • • 


CD • 


p • 


. CO • • 


CD • 


Pi. . 




• p. . 


P • 


CD • 


. *a * • 


P • 


<j> . . 




• CD • • 


CD • 


•d • 


• CD • • 




P,. . 




. p.. . 


*P • 


CD • 


. p . . 










CD • 


P • 


. p • • 










P • 


p. 


• CD • • 










P. 


CD • 


. P . . 










CD • 


p. 












p. 









CO 

o 

CO 



o 
p 

o 
»-k 

o 
p 

CO 
CD 
CO 

p 

ct 
ct 

CD 

p 
p 

CD 
P 



H H 

•f- H» 00> O 09 

^■WOOWUiMVnViOOHOH 



|_j -^j j_j jy> no OVjJ V*> -0 l-» 00 O^O 



a 
S3 

»-3 
O 
c+ 

OB 



o 
or 
en 

CD 



►3 
O 
c+ 

CD 
CD 



I—* I— • I—* i — • I— » I—* I— • 



CdCDCdCdCDCdCDCDCDCD 
p3{Dpj{X)0D0DCD£O0900 

TOCOtOCOCDCOCDCDCOCO 

oooooooooo 

V-^ 

> > > > > > > > {t> > 

CDCSCDCDCDCDCDCDCDG) 



I -P- M^O-p- W H H I I 



s 



I I HI HI (OWI I 



I I I I I I I I I I 



o 



CO 



-P~ 

o 



I I N> I I I I I I I 

M 



fO H» V* »-• r-» M I I I I 









>— 1 
















CO 








T - 








O 








UJ 








































i-> 










Do 






*"t 


O 








«<J 






C+ 


CO 






P 








CD 




O CD 








O 








V.J E-T 








o oo 




•~b 


UJ 


P T 




i 




** 




■< 




c+ CD 




1 




P< 




CO 


CO 






CD 
















CD 








P 
















P 


UJ 






CO 


o 






(D 


*s 






rn 




B 3 








« 5 








H* PD 




> * 




CT P 








C» CD 




(— I 

v_/ 


H* 


CP P 




CP 








LJ 




» * 




1 h 
f 


CD 






i-> 
























cu 








p 










Do 








O 


CD 




Hrl 


*s 


C J TJ 




rn 

UJ 


• uj 




Uy 




P 




P 
















| (* 




P 




ft 
P 








TP) 
















C) 


CO 


O 




CD 








O 








CD 

















cr 


to 






CD 


O 






•i 


«<J 








CO 


















o 








c+ 




H 




OB 




vO 


Q 






VjJ 








vO 



I 
I 



o 

P 
P 
Di 

O 
c+ 

CD 



►3 
O 
c+ 
P 
H 
CO 



»-3 
O 
c+ 

CD 
I- 1 
CO 



H H H H M l-» H 

On\Ji -P-.VO K)H O vO 05 ~-0 



CDCDCDCDCDCDCDCDCDCD 
CDCDCDCDCDCBCDfflODP 

CD CD CO CO CO CO CO CO CO CO 

oooooooooo 

^""^ 

ItCDOttOfltQiQiOQ) 



I N> ro h ro H H H 



HI HIOHHH I I I 



I I HH I H 



I N> I I I I I I I I 



^3 



0» 



I MMMHI HI • I 



-0 



•F- 



W-OWVJ* JO 0&-P" I I 



W M M H I I » 1 • • 


















CD 








H 








H> 








P 
















P 








CD 








P 








O 




O 




«< 


o 


p hd 








3 CD CD 




O 


CO 


B P 4 




O 




H- Ct 




B 




c+Htt 




B 




C» 1 




H" 




CD 




c+ 




Pi 




B 


H 






CD 


CD 






P 








ct 








CO 




g 




ffl 


tad 











Oi O CD 






*< 


<D B S 




> 


co 


B 




n 




h- 




CD 




(t c+ 4 




CO 




4 c+ffl 






S-' 


C m H 
P vU T 




Ci 


H« 






>-% 


•i 


P H 






t— ' 


CD flPVj 




td 


CO 


P 




O 




ct 




"< 








CO 








CD 








P 








Pi 


W 








O 


O O CD 




CP 


<<i 


C+ H* B B 




H* 


CO 


O CO B *0 




►1 




O H- O 




H 




O p c+ 4 




CO 




on /—f m 

w V*? C» Jj> 




Q 


e 4 a> 4 






4 (R Oi H> 






c+ CD H 










CO 








O 




ttf 


CD 




O 


O »tJ 






• CD 




CO 














• H» 




CP 


P 






HC*> 






NO 






6 





H 

O 



£6 



- 11 - 

Contributions Received Toward Support of Children 

From Cities and Towns $223,140.72 

From Parents 33,220.22 

Foster Home Applications Received 

For Adoptions 120 

For Infants (under 3) 187 

For Children (from 3 to 12) 796 

For Girls (over 12) 460 

For Boys (over 12) 76 

Total 1,639 

Foreign Born Children in Care of Department 

Canada 37 

Italy 4 

Poland 2 

Russia «. 2 

England 4 

Ireland * 3 

Scotland 1 

Total 55 



lot 



- 12 



These tables, which are self-explanatory, might be supple- 
mented with a few other faots about the children under care on November 
30, 1940. Of the 8,231 children, 2,652 or 32.2$ were illegitimate. 
Four hundred and nineteen (419) were colored. One thousand, two hundred 
one (1,201) were children both of whose parents were foreign, 922 
had foreign born mothers and 661, foreign born fathers. There were 
only 377 full orphans but 573 were children whose fathers had died and 
1,153 1 children whose mothers had died. 



Work of the Investigating Unit. 

There has been little variation in the routine work of this 
unit. Dependent children are received under General Laws, Chapter 
119 i Section 38 or committed by local boards of public welfare under 
Section 22 of the same Chapter. Every case is investigated although 
there is an occasional instance in which, due to its urgency, the 
investigation follows the reception of the child. These are classi- 
fied as "After Care" cases in the statistics. However, not all 
"After Care" cases are such emergencies, but may refer to instances 
where it was indicated that a proper investigation had not preceded 
the placement of the child with the division. 

As a result of such indication, many neglect cases are referred for 
further study by this unit. For several years now - so far as time 
will allow - an annual evaluation has been made of the family situation 
in each case of dependent children received during these same years. 
This study may show a considerable change in the family picture - 
e.g., the mother of an illegitimate child may have married so that a 
study of the settlement is necessary or the possibility of discharge 
should be considered. The case is first entered as "After Care" and 
may later become a "Discharged". Further facts may be established 
after the commitment under section 22 of an abandoned child that 
determine settlement, and as a result the child must either be 
discharged or remain under care with reimbursement from the plaoe of 
settlement. 

There is a steady increase in the number of request from 
other states for investigations. These may ask for the placement of 
a child in the Commonwealth either on the basis of settlement or 
with suitable friends or relatives, or may be requests for social 
history only. Of such requests, classified as "General File", 
117 were handled during the past year. We make similar requests 
of other states and receive corresponding help from them. 

This unit also makes investigations and plans for the 
discharge of dependent children to relatives, friends or local 
boards of public welfare. 

Since 1930, when section 30A of Chapter 119 of the General 
Laws was adopted as a statute, the matter of bonding children placed 
in Massachusetts with non-relatives (with the exception of children 
placed for adoption) has been one of the functions of this unit. 



- 13 



The chief interest has been to prevent unsuitable placements and to 
avoid the abandonment of children not properly chargeable to Massa- 
chusetts. A new phase of this work developed during 1940 with the 
evacuation of children from warring Europe and their consequent 
arrival here. The Attorney General handed down the decision that 
although the law could not be waived in favor of these foreign guest 
children, every effort to simplify its fulfillment should be made. 
Two classes of children have been admitted: those sponsored by the 
United States Committee for the Care of European Children, and those 
privately sponsored. The United States Committee filed a ^multiple 
bond to cover a limited number of children and will increase this as 
the need arises. Each other case is handled separately and files 
are kept showing all such children in the Commonwealth apart from 
relatives. Since there seem to be no records available for other 
children than those under the United States Committee, it is neces- 
sary to canvass all possible sources for data concerning them so that 
much time must be spent on this work. Later visitation of these 
children is anticipated since it is required annually by the statute 
covering the children who must be bonded* 

The following figures sum up the work of this unit for the 

year: 



Children Families 

Applications pending December 1, 1939 533 355 

Applications received December 1, 1939 

to November 30, 1940 904 641 

(Involving 133 re-applications) 



T0tal 1,437 995 



Advised only 30 

Applications withdrawn 38 

Assumed by relatives 304 

Assumed by private agencies ♦ 62 

Assumed by public agencies ♦. 110 331 

Children committed General Laws, Chapter 119, 

Section 22: 

Boys 34 

Girls 44 78 57 

(including 2 foundlings) 

Children received General Laws, Chapter 119 

Section 38: 
Boys 160 

Girls JL22 282 219 

Pending December 1, 1940 533 388 



Total 1,437 995 



- u - 

Disoharge 

Children Families 

Applications for discharge pending December 1, 1939 97 71 
Applications received December 1, 1939 to 

November 30, 1940 234 167 

Total 331 238 

Disposition as follows: 

Discharged 154 

Refused 33 

Withdrawn 39 163 

Pending December 1, 1940 105 75 

Total 331 238 

After Care 

Cases pending December 1, 1939 51 

Cases added December 1, 1939 to November 30, 1940 57 

Total 108 

Disposition as follows: 

Recommended for discharge after investigation 22 

Closed 33 

Pending December 1, 1940 53 

Total 108 

General File 

Cases pending December 1, 1939 /• 24 

Cases received December 1, 1939 to November 30, 1940 117 

Total 141 

Cases closed 102 

Pending December 1, 1940 39 

Total 141 



- 15 



The Care of Our Wards 

There has been little of striking interest this year in 
the care of the younger groups of children. It might be interesting, 
however, to note a few points in connection with the older children, 
the feeble-minded children, and the children placed for adoption. 



OLDER BOYS 

The older boys group, including the boys between the ages of 
twelve and twenty-one, had 2,081 boys under supervision at/the end of 
the year. This group was cared for by sixteen (16) men visitors who 
also covered the court hearings tabulated above. 

On December 1, 1940, 1,394 boys were in school, as follows: 



Elementary 


673 


Junior High 


283 


High 


289 


Special Classes 


74 


Vvayside Inn Boys School 


40 


Trade Schools 


19 


Vocational School 


4 


College 


4 


Beverly School for the Deaf 


1 


Business College 


1 


Evening Classes 


1 


Art School 


1 


Continuation Sohool 


1 


Agricultural School 


2 


Mechanical School 


1 




1,394 



As of the same date, 377 boys were employed, of whom 132 
were enrolled in the Civilian Conservation Corps and 27 enlisted 
in the United States Services. The employment of the others was di 
trlbuted, as follows: 



Farms 58 

Mills and Factories 57 

State Police Barracks ' 28 

Stores 27 

Restaurants 13 

Unskilled labor 10 

National Youth Administration 4 

Offices 4 

Garages 3 

Messenger Service 1 

Hospital Attendant 1 

Gas Station Attendant 1 

Laundry worker 1 

W.P.A. worker 1 

Miscellaneous 9 



2T£ 



- 16 



The National Youth Administration, with the reduction in the mini- 
mum age to sixteen, will prove a valuable asset in the coming year 
although only 4 boys were enrolled in two National Youth Administration 
camps at the close of this year. 

The Hayden Memorial Good Will Inn has been extremely coopera- 
tive, giving shelter for varying periods to some of our oldest boys for 
whom planning is hardest. 

OLDER GIRLS 



The older girls group, covering girls between the ages of twelve 
and twenty-one, had under care 1,859 girls at the close of the year. 

One thousand, two hundred forty-three (1,243) girls were in 
jchool during the past year, as follows: 

Elementary 328 

Junior High 332 

High 489 

Special Classes 31 

Trade Schools 28 

Evening Classes 6 

Continuation Classes 2 

Nurses Training 19 

Teachers' College 33 

Business' College 5 

1,243~" 



As the department pays no tuition beyond the high school, 
advanced education for our wards is difficult to obtain. It means that 
a girl must earn her own tuition as well as her board and clothing, though 
we occasionally help with the latter. Of our girls in Teachers' College, 
one is a sophomore who earns her board by giving service in the family 
*ith whom she lives. She did domestic work all summer, and occasionally 
during the school year secures work in a store for an afternoon or evening. 
Her brother has thus far paid her tuition, as a result of the visitor's 
solicitation, and we have given a small amount of clothing. Another is 
a junior who has lived with the same family for years. They give her her 
board. During the summer she worked as a waitress and took care of children. 
Her tuition is being generously paid by the father of one of her former 
schoolmates, a school principal. The third girl is a freshman who has 
been an honor student, active in school athletics and social programs. 
Dependable and a good manager, she worked all summer to earn money for her 
tuition. The family with whom she lives gives her her board and a foster 
mother with whom she formerly lived makes her well-timed gifts of suitable 
clothing. 

Nineteen (19) girls are taking nurses' training. It has been 
our policy to have a girl who wants this training work and save one 
hundred dollars ($100.) before entering upon her course. This amount, 
generally earned in domestic work, defrays the cost of her uniforms and 
initial expenses. 



17 - 



Eighty-eight (88) girls graduated from high school this 
year. Twenty-one (21) of them were on the Honor Roll and one, who 
graduated just before she was seventeen, on the National Honor Roll. 
This girl was interested also in athletics, was a Girl ^cout, a 
member of the Drum Corps, and active in Sunday School work. Three 
others stood second in their class and one stood third. Of these 
graduates, one has married and three have found homes with relatives. 
Those who are not continuing their education are employed. 

The number of girls in various types of employment during 
the past year is as follows: 



Housework 255 

Mills and Factories 34 

Offices 11 

Hospital attendants 9 

Salesgirls 6 

Waitresses 11 

Dressmaker 1 

Cashier 1 

Card colorer 1 

W.p.A. project worker 1 

Ward maids 5 

Beauty shop operator 1 

Hand-weaver 1 

Bakery cook 1 

Power machine operator 1 

Training for hospital attendant 1 



340~~ 

During the past year 106 girls became of age and passed 
from our care. Their total savings were $7,554.97. The largest 
amount saved by any one girl was |437.00. 



mentally Deficient Children . 

The three social workers assigned to work with feeble-minded 
children have had under care in the past year a total of 474 children 
who had been diagnosed as f ebble-minded at the state school clinics* 
For about three-fourths of these children, institutional care had been 
recommended but was not available, ^ue/to overcrowding in the 
three state schools, only 72 of the division's children could be com- 
mitted this year; consequently, 193 children were boarded in foster 
homes and 34 were in wage homes. Sixty-nine (69) were in the Stete 
Infirmary or at the Hospital Cottages for Children at Baldwinsville , 
because of physical as well as mental problems thet made it impossible 
for them to be cared for in the community. Thirty-six (36) others 
were in institutions, as follows: 21 in the Monson State Hospital for 
epileptics, 9 in various state hospitals for mental patients, 3 in 
private hospitals, 2 in the State Sanatorium at Rutland and one in 
Perkins Institution for the Blind. 



LI 



- 18 



Of the 14 who became of age during the year,- 7 remained in 
hospitels, 3 were referred to relatives, 2 continued in their employ- 
ment, 1 was referred for supervision to the Department of Mental 
Health and 1 was in the United States Army. During the year 7 died, 
17 were discharged, 3 committed to the Lyman School and 11 referred 
back to the main group of normal children. 

On November 30, 1940, including those on parole in their 
own homes, there were 359 under care - mostly children who are on 
the waiting lists of the three schools and for whom it is no easy 
matter to secure the right type of foster home. Thirty (30) girls are 
employed and have savings accounts totaling $2,020.47* Two (2) boys 
are in the Civilian Conservation Corps and 2 in the Army. 



Children Placed for Adoption 

Applications for children for adoption 



Pending December 1, 1939 51 

New applications 61 

Applications from current foster parents 34 ^£ 

Withdrawn 40 

Disapproved because of references 4 

Investigated 67 

Pending November 30, 1940 35 



Homes investigated 



Approved for adoption 60 
Approved but withdrewn 2 
Disapproved 5 ^ 



The outstanding feature in this work during the pest year 
has been the increasing demand for children for adoption, which has 
fer exceeded the number eligible for such placement. However, if 
there were more than one visitor available for this work many more 
of the requests could be filled from among our children. Applica- 
tions made in person and by letter have flooded the division from 
people of all classes and in all sorts ptf circumstances. These 
applicants, if they could not obtain children from the division, 
sought advice and help in the hope of securing them elsewhere. (Jiving 
such advice is an important service but with only one worker it has 
been impossible to give satisfactory assistance* 

During the current year 16 children have been placed for 
adoption in new homes and 25 changed from a boarding to a free basis 
in the same home as a preliminary step toward adoption. Forty (40) 
children have been legally adopted, 21 girls and 19 boys. 



over 



- 18 - (continued) 



Of the 40 children, 4 were adopted by their mothers and step- 
fathers, 2 by other relatives, 20 by their former foster parents 
and 14 by people who took them for that purpose. These adoptions 
were distributed as follows through the counties of the Commonwealth. 



Barnstable 1 

Bristol 1 

Essex 5 

Franklin 1 



Hampden 
Hampshire 
Middlesex 
Norfolk 



3 
1 
10 
8 



Plymouth 1 
Suffolk 6 
Worcester 3 



TOTAL 



There are now 52 children placed on trial for adoption. 



- 19 - 



OTHER SERVICES TO CHILDREN 



Following are reports on six other functions of the 
division, carrying which it seems better described by its present 
title of "Child Guardianship" than by the old "State Minor Wards". 



Licensing of Maternity Hospitals 



Licenses in force December 1, 1939 172 
(In 95 cities and towns) 

Expired during the year 83 
Surrendered and canceled during the year 12 95 



Continuing in force 77 

Re-issues 80 

New issues 9 89 

Licenses in force November 30, 1940 166 
(In 92 cities and towns) 

Issued to: corporations 131 

physicians 14 

nurses 14 

boards of public welfare 3 

other persons 4 



TEE 

Two hundred and thirty-seven (237) visits were made to 
hospitals for purposes of inspection and investigation of complaints. 

The returns from the questionnaires mailed to licensees 
showed 55,083 cases delivered; 54,204 live births; 1,431 stillbirths; 
122 deaths of mothers; 1,215 deaths of babies. 

The licensee of each hospital ^is responsible for the use 
at every birth of the one per cent solution of silver nitrate furnished 
by the Department of Health for the prevention of ophthalmia neonatorum. 
Each licensee shall be responsible for the observation of General Laws, 
Chapter 111, Sections 110 and 111, relative to diseases of the eyes. 

Four (4) licenses to conduct homes for pregnant women were 

in force on December 1, 1939. One (1) license expired; 2 were 

canceled; 4 new licenses were issued; and 5 remained in force 
on November 30, 1940. 



70 



- 20 - 



Licensing of Infant Boarding Homes 

During the past year 489 licenses to maintain infant boarding 
homes were granted or renewed under the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 119, Section 2 - in 106 cities and towns - in addition to 
the 447 licenses in force at the expiration of the previous year* 
Four hundred and fifty-seven (457) licenses expired by the one year 
limitation, 1 was revoked, 71 were canceled and 417 licenses, permit- 
ting the boarding of 853 infants in 105 cities and towns, remained 
in force on November 30, 1940. Thirty-six (36) applications were 
withdrawn and 2 were refused. The licensed homes represent not 
only those for infants under the care of the department but those 
also for infants placed out by local boards of public welfare, 
private agencies and parents or relatives. 



Removal of Children 

Under General Laws, Chapter 119, Section 28, an agent of 
the division may, when necessary, remove a child under seven who 
is "sheltered or maintained apart from his parents and is not re- 
ceiving proper care for the protection of the child from 

neglect or abuse". During the past year 7 children were so 
removed. Many others, however, were caused to be removed as it 
is our custom to remove only one child and to serve notice on the 
foster mother that after a certain date she may receive or maintain 
no children under the age of seven. 



Investigation of Adoptions . 

Under G-eneral Laws, Chapter 210, Section 5A, there were in 
the past year 955 petitions for adoption referred by the probate 
courts for investigation. The new high record has meant discourage- 
ment for the workers in this unit whose numbers have not been in- 
creased since its establishment. Not only has the number of petitions 
referred in a year risen constantly but the amount of work per case 
is greater as the staff have become more thorough and their reports 
more detailed. The courts have gradually and naturally considered 
the reports more valuable and from time to time judges request that 
our visitors be present at hearings when adoptions are contested. 
Additional work also comes from other States when departments of 
public welfare and private child-placing agencies place children on 
trial for adoption in Massachusetts. We are asked to investigate 
homes and in some cases to supervise the children during the trial 
period preceding adoption. The resulting total load on the staff 
has meant in the past year that they have had to cut oorners against 
their inclinations. 

Although the statistics do not show it, many poor adoptions 
are prevented because of the investigation made by the division. 
After the report of the investigation is filed in the probate court, 
the attorney for the petitioners reads it there. 



over 



- 21 - 



When he feels that, as a result of the report, the adoption will not 
. be granted he may withdraw from the case with the result that it is 
never acted upon by the court. Y<hile the present law works to the 
advantage of the children concerned and marks a great improvement 
over conditions before its enactment, there is still no protection 
of the sort that skilled workers can give to the child at the point 
of placement for adoption. 



(Adoption Statistics) 



7> 



- 22 - 



ADOPTION INVESTIGATION STATISTICS FOR THE YEAR 



ENDING NOVEMBER 30, 1940 



Pending December 1, 1939 



Notices received from courts December 1, 1939 

to November 30, 1940 

Total 

Investigations completed December 1, 1939 

to November 30, 1940 



133 
955 
1,088 



For adoption of legitimate children ; 
By relatives 

By persons other than relatives 



For adoption of illegitimate children : 

*By maternal relatives 
By alleged relatives 
By persons other than relatives 



For adoption of foundlings: 

Withdrawn after investigation 

Withdrawn without investigation 
Allowed without investigation 
Delayed six months 

Pending December 1, 1940 
Total 

Cases reported to Courts: 

Investigated and approved 
Investigated and disapproved 
Reported withdrawn 



244 
61 

305 



295 
27 
290 



1 
1 
1 



862 
60 
6 

"923" 



Notices received showing disposition by Courts: 



Approved and granted 
Approved and dismissed 
Disapproved and dismissed 
Disapproved and granted 
Dismissed without investigation 



755 
2 

5 
19 
1 



305 



612 



5 
6 



931 

157 
1,088 



928 



782 



175 of these petitions were by the mother and her husband* 



- 22 - (continued) 



DISTRIBUTION OF PETITIONS ACCORDING TO COUNTIES 



Middlesex 

Suffolk 

Worcester 

Essex 

Norfolk 



239 
191 
114 
99 
93 



Bristol 

Hempden 

Plymouth 

Berkshire 

Franklin 



67 
42 
41 
34 
13 



Barnstable 
Hampshire 
Dukes 
Nantucket 



11 
6 

5 




TOTAL 



955 



- 23 - 



Social Service for Crippled Children 

From September 1, 1939 to August 31, 1940, reports were re- 
ceived by this subdivision on 6,577 physically handicapped children* 
The majority of these came from 174 cities and towns in Massachusetts 
which made reports in compliance with the provisions of General Laws, 
Chapter 71, Section 46A. However, as in other years, an appreciable 
number of children were referred for investigation by other state 
agencies, hospitals, local public or private organizations, and 
interested individuals. 

Four thousand, one hundred seventy-seven (4,177) children, 
reported during the year, were previously registered with us, and 
2,400 were new cases. 

One thousand, two hundred forty-one (1,241) of those reported 
on, were closed out of our active files because they had recovered; 
were over twenty-one years of age; had moved out of the Commonwealth; 
died; or had such minor defects that they should no longer be con- 
sidered handicapped. 

Five thousand, three hundred thirty-six (5,336) children were 
continued in our active files which, on August 31, 1940, contained 
records totaling 10,514 handicapped children. 

While infantile paralysis continues to be the leading cause 
of orthopedic defects, there has been a steady and rapid increase in 

the past six years in the number of children reported handicapped as 
the result of rheumatic fever. In 1934, 231 such children were 
included in the census reports. This year there were 1,076, or over 
one-third more than those having infantile paralysis. This, 
unquestionably, points to the need for further attention to the problem 
of rheumatic fever among children in Massachusetts* 

The following tables give the diagnoses of handicapping 
conditions in the order of their frequency. 



7 r 



- 24 - 

Crippled Children Children Otherwise Handicapped 



Infantile paralysis 
Cerebral palsy 
Congenital deformities 
Scoliosis 

Obstetrical paralysis 

Osteomyelitis 

Fractures 

Bone and joint tuberculosis 
Arthritis 

Progressive muscular dystrophy 
Other orthopedic defects inolude: 
Amputations and other traumatic 
deformities of the bones and 
joints; deformities from burns; 
epiphysitis; hydrocephalus with 
paralysis; encephalitis with 
paralysis; Friedreich's Ataxia; 
Perthe's disease; fragilitas 
ossium; hemophilia; Osgood- 
Schlatter's disease, and 
sclerosis. 



Total 



724 
392 
345 
144 
124 
116 

93 
91 
75 
56 



585 
2,745 



Rheumatic heart, chorea, and 
congenital heart conditions 1,076 
Defective hearing 316 
Defective eyesight 277 
Respiratory disorders 248 
Epilepsy 126 
Kidney disorders 60 

Other medical conditions include: 

primary and secondary anemia; 

appendicitis; diabetes; 

colitis; cystitis; brain tumors; 

and nervous disorders* 488 



2,591 
5,336 



A large majority of the children were receiving medical care 
at the time they were investigated, and many others were referred for 
care, so that a total of 4,450 received treatment during the year as 
follows: 1,382 privately; 2,573 in clinics; 314 in hospitals or 
convalescent homes; and 181 in such institutions as the Massachusetts 
Hospital School at Canton, Hospital Cottages at Baldwinsville end the 
State Sanatorium at Lakeville* 

Eight hundred and two (802) children were not under active 
care. Most of these were seen at infrequent intervals for medical 
check-ups. A few, however, refused care. Treatment had been com- 
pleted in 77 cases, and there were 7 children on whom definite informa- 
tion as to treatment was not obtainedo 

One thousand, one hundred fifty-four (1,154) handicapped 
children investigated, were recommended to the Department of Education 
for approval of home instruction under the provisions of Chapter 71, 
Section 46A. Twenty-nine (29) of these did not receive instruction 
at home as the towns in which they lived claimed exemption from the 
law because they had less than five children who were unable to attend 
school. Three hundred and seventeen (317) children received instruction 
while patients in hospitals or convalescent homes, and 123 others were 
taught at home during convalescence from temporary disabilities. 
Twenty-one (21) children who were receiving home instruction were re- 
investigated and recommended for physical or mental reexaminations, 
return to school, or for institutional care. 



- 25 - 



Two thousand, four hundred fifty-six (2,456) children attended 
regular public school classes. Recommendations on 21 of these 
included referrals for re-examination or for appropriate institutional 
care, and referrals to the Division of the Blind and to the Division 
of Vocational Rehabilitation. Four hundred and thirty-five (435) 
children received their education in special schools or classes for 
the handicapped. 

Of the 830 remaining children, 293 had completed their education 
(36 of these are now being followed by the Division of Vocational 
Rehabilitation) ; 139 were mentally unable to do formal school work; 
212 were of pre-school age; 44 had left school at sixteen or were 
ill at home and not interested in further education, having completed 
or nearly completed the elementary grades; 56 were in hospitals, 
were awaiting admission to hospitals or institutions, or were too 
ill at home for home instruction. Fifty-one (51) were not recommended 
for home instruction for such reasons as: adjustment back into 
school was arranged; appropriate hospital or institutional care was 
advised; referral was made for training under the Division of 
Vocational Rehabilitation; or they were reported too late in the 
school year for instruction to be given. Finally, there were 35 
children under the supervision of various agencies on whom definite 
information as to education was not obtained* 

As will be seen by this report, much of the work in this 
subdivision is carried on in cooperation with the State Department 
of Education. However, since the Department of Public Health took 
over the medical care of indigent crippled children in 1936 under 
the Social Security Act, there has been a close working relationship 
with that department as well in exchanging information regarding the 
crippled children of the Commonwealth and in collaborating on the 
specific problems pertaining to the education and general welfare 
of indigent crippled children. 

The continued splendid cooperation which we receive from the 
many other state and local, public and private institutions and 
organizations to which we turn in making our investigations of the 
children reported to this office, is also deeply appreciated. We 
regret that because of an inadequate staff we not only cannot cover 
our own work as thoroughly as we should, but we cannot give these 
agencies the amount of assistance which they should have in working 
out some of the problems of their more difficult cases. 

/ 



77 



- 26 • 



Child Welfare Services 



Someone has said that one cannot do for a child five years hence 
what he should do for that child today. The survey of the needs of 

I the children of Massachusetts begun by Miss Esther Hill in 1939 under 
the auspices of Child Welfare Services, was completed by her in 1940. 

; It reveals above all else the wisdom of this statement as it applies 
to the less fortunate children of our Commonwealth. Child placing 
agencies, both public and private; the S.P.C.C.; the Juvenile Courts; 
the correctional institutions have all come to the rescue when the 
period of advanced social breakdown has been reached -- when discord 
and neglect have become alarming, and health, personality and behavior 
problems have developed to a serious degree. Sometimes the home can 
be salvaged at even so late a stage as this; frequently, however, the 
family situation is past redemption. The bitter experience of being 
uprooted,- often hastily, from the familiar environment of one's own 
family, relatives and playmates, from church, home and school now fells 
to the lot of the type of individual least able to endure such un- 
certainty and hardship, a defenseless child. And, in a large number 
of situations, the whole picture might have been different had we not 
waited for the "five years hence" — had we begun our efforts when for 
the slight misunderstanding within the family circle it was still "today". 

In some of our cities the family welfare societies have, so far 
as their limited budgets would allow, solved the problem in its early 
development, for a number of children. For those in our non-urban 
areas, however, there has frequently been nothing to do, as numerous 
social workers have sorrowfully remarked, but to "wait till there is 
real trouble" -- till the juvenile court stage has perhaps been reached* 
What is more, for these non-urban children there are fewer resources, 
even when the period of advanced social breakdown has arrived, than 
for their more fortunate contemporaries in our Massachusetts cities* 
In short, according to this survey, it is imperative that we become 
actively concerned about the needs of most of our agency children far 
earlier than we become concerned about them today, and that we give - 
both in the early and late stages of problem development - the same 
consideration to the children in the country and in the small towns as 
we have already given to some of the children in our more forward-looking 
cities. 

Under the provisions of the Social/Security Act, Massachusetts 
now receives $17,506 annually for the purpose of "establishing, extending, 
and strengthening, especially in predominantly rural areas, public- 
welfere services for the protection and care of homeless, dependent, 
and neglected children, and children in danger of becoming delinquent," 
To this sum is added a small contribution from the Commonwealth. The 
total amount is entirely inadequate, however, for direct case work, 
since both the survey mentioned above and the demonstration service 
offered between 1936 and 1939 to the Southern Worcester County and 
Cape Cod sections, have proved fairly conclusively that the need of 
such assistance to the children of our non-urban areas is extremely great.. 
A plan has been mapped out by the writer of the survey, the Director 
of the Division of Child Guardianship, a representative of the 
Children's Bureau and the Advisory Committee of the Division of Child 
Guardianship, to use this small sum of money to the best advantage, 

I it 



- 27 



It has been agreed that, aside from the supervisor of Child Welfare 
Services whose appointment was made this year, there should be ap- 
pointed four consultants, each of whom will have as her territory one 
of the districts of the Division of Aid and Relief, the four areas with 
the largest rural populations being chosen for these activities. The 
major task assigned to these consultants will be that of awakening the 
communities to a deep concern for the needs of their children and to a 
better understanding as to the methods by which these needs can be met* 
It is hoped that, as a result of the planning of all these workers, 
many towns and cities will - either singly or in combinations of two 
or three - eventually employ child welfare visitors to meet the problems 
of the children within their own homes in the early stages of develop- 
ment. 

Three towns in Southern 7/orcester County - Southbridge, 
Sturbridge and Charlton - have such an arrangement for the care of 
their children, and town officials and private citizens seem equally 
enthusiastic about its success. The demands upon the child welfare 
worker, appointed in May 1939, practically since the very inception 
of the program have been almost too great for a single individual 
to bear. And now communities nearby are looking with envy at the 
fortunate lot of the children of these three towns, and their boards 
of public welfare are discussing ways and means by which they, too, 
can employ a child welfare worker. It is our hope that a number of 
such town experiments will eventually be the result of this small 
beginning in Southbridge, Sturbridge and Charlton, 

The following story is an example of the activity of a child 
welfare worker in a small community, A fifteen year old girl begged 
the Chief of Police to send her away to a reform school because 
her "peasant parents", as she termed them, had no sympathy with her 
ambition to complete high school, accused her of being lazy because 
she preferred school to going out into domestic work, denounced her 
associates because she sought the companionship of girls of better 
social standing than that of her family, and considered her a liabi- 
lity to the family since she made no contribution toward its support^ 
Ker older sister abetted the parents in their attitude because she 
had been contributing to the family income ever since she was fourteen. 
Eleanor came in despair to the police one morning after her mother 
had struck her on the head, leaving a gash. She said, "If my mother 
does this to me, I must be wrong. But I went to be somebody, I 
love school. I don't want to be just a factory worker*" 

The police turned the problem over to Child Welfsre Services, 
Since the father was a gambler who often lost his wages, his wife 
became fearful of insecurity and disgrace. Besides, a bitter 
religious feud broke out within the family circle. In desperation 
the mother began to vent her rage on Eleanor, and the child saw no 
way out of the difficulty except in being taken away from her parents, 
whom she considered unteachable. 

At first, the mother was suspicious of the interest of Child 
Welfare Services, but gradually, after trying time and again to 
justify herself, she voluntarily came to the worker to discuss the 
family situation. She agreed that Eleanor should return to school, 
and the child set about making up lost time. Her sister was envious 
and bitter, however, and with the father and sister lining up against 



if 



- 28 - 



the mother and Eleanor in family quarrels, the girl lost courage age in. 
The child welfare worker succeeded in helping the sister to have a 
fairer attitude and, at the same time, to find some compensation 
for the drudgery of her own existence. To persuade the father, 
however, meant a tedious and sometimes discouraging struggle, but 
in time he too became proud of the daughter who was determined to 
"be somebody" and to "amount to something". So it was that a 
home at the very breaking point was saved for parents and children, 
as well as for the community which had sufficient concern for its 
citizens to supply, out of its own tax funds, a worker skilled in 
the art of helping children at the point where trouble begins. 

Recently a member of the board of public welfare of one of 
the towns using the services of a child welfare worker, had occasion 
to appear in one of our city courts, in behalf of some children. 
At the close of the hearing the judge asked this local official how 
it happened that his town had employed such a worker. The board 
member described the demonstration conducted by Child Welfare 
Services in Southern V.'orcester County and told of the determination 
of the town officials to continue the work which had been begun. 
When he finished speaking, the judge remarked, "The State of 
Massachusetts needs 100 such child welfare workers*" 

It is our desire that there may actually be, in the not too 
remote future, approximately 100 such workers, locally supported, 
serving our less fortunate children in their own homes. Affection 
and understanding are the birthright of every child, and if that 
birthright is to be effective in a happy and useful existence, it 
must be his not "five years hence" but "today". 



2* 



STATE BOARD OF HOUSING 
John Carroll^Chairman 
(See also P.D. 154-Annual Report of the State Board of Housing) 



DIVISION OF JUVENILE TRAINING 

Charles M. Davenport, Director 
Walter C. Bell, Executive Secretary 

(41 Mt. Vernon Street, Boston) 

See P.D. No. 93, Annual report of the Trustees of the 
Massachusetts Training Schools. 



INSTITUTIONS UNDER THE DEPARTMENT 

The following brief statements relate to the general supervision 
of each of the live institutions under the department. These re-ports 
are followed by comparative and -ore detailed consideration of the 
financial administration of the institutions. Further details about the 
work of the various institutions may be found in the institution reports 
which are published separately. 



THE TFWKSBURY STATE HOSPITAL AND I FIRMARY, 
TEWKSBURY 

Lawrence K. Kelley, LL.5., M.D., Superintendent 

Provides infirmary care for needy persons not chargeable for support 
to any city or town. Insane persons and those with contagious diseases 
are not admitted. 

See P.D. No. 26, Annual report of the Trustees of the Tewksbury 

State Hospital and Infirmary. 



INFIRMARY DEPART. 1ENT AT THE STATE FARM, 
BRIDGEWATER 

(Under the Department of Correction) 

James A. Warren, Superintendent 

Provides infirmary care for indigent persons (male) not chargeable to 
any city or town. 

See P.D. No. 24, Annual report of the State Farm. 



MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITAL SCHOOL, CANTON 

John E. Fish, M.D., Superintendent 

Provides care and schooling for the crippled and deformed children 
of the Commonwealth^ a school with hospital facilities. 

See P.D. No. 82, Annual report of the Trustees of the 
Massachusetts Hospital School. 



LYMAN SCHOOL FOR BOYS, Y/ESTBOROUGH 

Charles A. DuBois, Superintendent 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for delinquent "boys 
under fifteen years of age; cottage plan. 

See P.D. No. 93, Annual report of the Trustees of the 
Massachusetts Training Schools. 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, SHIRLEY 

George P, Campbell, Superintendent 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for boys over 
fifteen and under twenty-one years of age; only boys under eighteen may 
be admitted. 

See P.D. No. 93, Annual report of the Trustees of the 
Massachusetts Training Schools. 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, LANCASTER 

Miss Catharine M. Campbell, Superintendent 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for delinc aent girls 
under seventeen years of age at time of com fitment. 

Se» P.D. No. 93, Annual report of the Trustees oj the 
Massachusetts Training Schools. 

SUPERVISION OF INSTITUTIONS 

In the matter of financial supervision, the department examines and 
analyzes institution expenditures, keeping constantly in mind the 
function of the institution and the relation of its business tc the 
care, education, and welfare of the inmates. The following tables ere 
designed to shov. in detail the financial condition of each institution. 



lit 

C «* . 
• 1 

m 

Htm 

2* 



O O 1 o 



9 



Is 

O 



9 



3 



o 



i 



4 





H 

•» ca 


*j> Ckt 

° *. 

O O 1 


* I 

aa • 
e 


^ !> 9 

O ■ M 


3 S 
tJ o 
►» • 


-» i » 


P. 5 


T ^ • 
V ■ 
• • • 


Is 

o rw 
»-» 







km \a \n >-» vo 
• • • • • 

8 Sxll 8 



8 S3 8* 



3 



§ 



i 

e 



to 



— ■IVX O H» O 



■ 



I! 



M f 

II 



^ 
■ 



? 



I 

5 

t 



e 




• 



* 



■r 



• • • » • 

rvi « MsO *r 

• • » • • 
5 v$ 0> © M 



H» M »-» r*\$ 

»-• -4VX HV4 
• • • » • 



Uf to«J5 h 

vx «*vo 

a *siVs 



• • • • • 

• • • » • 



H 



CO 



o 

V9I 



M O 



M 

P0\j*yj4 rvj Oft 



rv w 

rn O vjlvp 



f 



-O 



S0 
•1 



I? 
M 

~< or" 
* • 



»-t 
S 
>• 
ff 

§ 
■ 

<♦ 

? 

i 
? 

I 

[ 

i 



ft 



s 



3 

s 
ft 

« 

ft 

8 
V 

M 

• 

ft 

*8 



fffff 

sr- -E 

• v rt 

• • • H 

. . . . g 
. . . . 9 



m m m ft 
M *ft*S 

M ft 

*« VV'h 

■ • • • « 

• • » » ♦ • 

MM \M 

o o VVh m 

S SmS^m 

•5 M M\J K«J 
M #SVJI STkJi 5 

01 \^ -4 O M 

• • • • • a 

5\ — 4 \>\o\* 

• • « • • « 

M M-4 OK M M 
ft 

SM MVS O M 
v£ tt\M M 

• • • • • • 

s0 M OBVrfvA St 

M •» 

O M J»» M 

~* 4 s "? *M V 

• • • • • • 

Jf 8 8 8" 85 

• • • • • 

Vjl *0 -4 *SA 

• • • • • 

*m3^5 

M M B 

m w-* m m 

• ••90 

til C ->l -4 M 



3 

3 

o 

2 



IE 

r 



rfil 

M E 



t 



iff! 

t * 

?© **•»*§ 

;**»{* 

7 

M M 
•»■«<• 

<••»!» 

e •» m ¥ 

f 3 

mj 

TJ » • » 

M • M 




■ 



I 



9 

ft 

ft 



I 



i 

ft 

s 

c 
ft 

3 



fffff 



H 



mm mm 
a rs • 



2* 



■ 

i 

ra 

• • • »3 

« • 

•>«» M M-4 
«TM^ M t^ O- 

Wl M v5 
M M O ^M 

• • 

25 



« • • • • 



• • • • • 

O NS M M MVO 

8 
ft 

« 

5 

« 

2 

* 

S 



v« <r> O M M 
«» 

M 

M M M M M 

• • • • • 



O 



M M<9 



M ft 
S. M 



M HU ru n> 
fr*Ooi-4 
S N M « 

m5s 5 
ft 

Wb< MVHO 




I 

m 

fi 



? 

M 



i i 



«» 



• — 

M • 



a 



a 



2 



2 

s 
►« 

2 



■• 

M 

X 

I 
i* 

I 

M 
f 



s sun 

> 



3 



<- <~> r> at n 

ss5;sr 
• » ■ 

Hi;! 

a o >i o 
>-• • 3C 

*• " " S.5 
« f6 



3 

3 

ca 



ffffff 

lift 



J. 5 5 

MM S ■ 
>-» *% »\ • M ■ 

» tiling 

M O t» 



ft? 



I 

M 



M M M M M M 
vS >^4 « Ot M !T> 

ft • • • • * 



i i i i i i 



M\JI N) On 

O H (V) \D 
• • • • 
M-^-^V* 

VJIOCIO 



7. 

: r 



! 

i 



9 



3 



I I I I 



« M ^ 
3 S.M 



o 



1*11 



IS 



a 



I 



• I • • • I 

V* M 

p- m m o» 



M HU M M 

fi M i\» M 



3 sg^S p- 

-4 O ~* vj* O 

• • • • • • 



O 



! 



M\H <n 
I M MS M 

O M 



e 



» a H r» * 

a • » 
y 9 M • 

_ o •» fc 7 

5^ 



S 



1 



H" M H» M ON 

V» 9* O -tr 

• • • • • • 

0» OVOvX 

O UO NVfl <7\ 



3 sSsrH 
• • • « • « 

N f* O ON 



"5^ S SvifvJfvo' 



M OVVrf 01 V 



vO 



■ H «» 

>^ H S 

-* • _ ** 

\-*<4» ■ 1 



I 



8 



—t 09 VO 0* ST 

VO tTWjl <N H» 
• • • • • 

— 4V*4Vj4-4 o 



-J 0»VO M 00 

so vn m->J o 
» • • • • 
vo ro v** ^ ►-» 
nooveiM 



M —4 OS 00 SB 

VO -4VXVO-4V0 

• • • • • • 

•P" OVS JIM H 

ru oi ot vO 



s 



VO 
V* 



VjjsO * H 



8 

g 
i 

O 

ae 



^ovw 
oa 



or\-4v© m 
• • • • • 

—J VO MVJI OI 
MVjJ 01 M 



<T>-~4 ^O 



• • • . • • 
vx at 01-4 o 



o 



vo 
v* 

V© 



vena tr 

\j4vO «* 



P 

o 

o 
o 



I • • • • • 
-J\JIV*4-4 -C 



t 



| • • • • • 

--4 VJI no -J O 



I- • • • • » 
-4-4 rv) o» >-> 



VO 

vx 

VO 



EM * 

r 1 * n 

v^vo 2 5 

vO V** • 



s 



I 



THE COUNTY TRAINING SCHOOLS 



Under the provisions of General Laws, chapter 77, section 2, 
the four county training schools for truants and habitual 
school offenders are subject to the visitation of this depart- 
ment, which is required to report thereon in its annual report. 

The names of the schools and the Superintendents are as 
follows: 

Essex County Training School, Lawrence, James FU Tetler. 
Ha.ipden County Training School, Snringf ield (Feeding Hills) 

H. E. Her rick 

Middlesex County Training School, North Chelmsford, J. Earl Woltoi 
Worcester County Training School, Oakdale (West Boylston) 

Win. E. Teachout 

Table I shows the trend of the population in the County Training 
Schools during the past five years. 



SUPERVISION OF THE SETTLED POOR RELIEVTD OR SUPPORTED BY CITIES AND TOWS 

General Laws, chapter 117, section 3> and cha? ter 121, sections 7 and 
16, provide that the Department of Public Welfare may visit and inspect all 
places where city or town poor are supported in families, and require th« 
department to visit, at least once a year, not only all children who are 
maintained by the Commonwealth, but all minor children who ar*t supported at 
t e expense any city or tosm. Children illegally retained in city or town 
infirmaries must be removed therefrom and placed at board at the expense af 
the city or town concerned, 

US SETTLED ADULT POOH PROVIDED b'OK IN FAMILIES 

Of the 316 adult persons reported by local authorities as fully sup- orted 
in families on J anuary 1, iy^O, 19 had died and p6 had been removed 1 > :'ore 
visits were ~a.de. The remaining Z41— 131 men and 110 *romen — were ail visited 
and reported on by the department's agents. They were supported by 92 cities 
and towns as follows: 



jfceushnet 


2 


Brewster 


2 


v aston 


1 


Keath 


1 


Agawam 


9 


Buckland 


1 


Erving 


X 


Hinsdale 


3 


Alford 


1 


Cheshire 


2 


Florida 


1 


Ho Id en 


3 


Amherst 


3 


Chester 


2 


Fraoinghaa 


7 


Eopkinton 


1 


Arlington 


2 


Cnicopee 


3 


Franklin 


2 


Huntington 


2 


Ashburnhaa 


2 


Clinton 


7 


Grafton 


3 


Lancaster 


1 




2 


Colrain 


1 


Granby 
y 

Granville 


1 


Lee 


i 


Auburn 


2 


Concord 


2 


1 


Lenox 


3 


Barnstable 


2 


Dal ton 


2 


Gt«Barrington 


13 


Leonii;ster 


4 


Belchertown 


1 


Deerf ield 


2 


Gr^e-nf ield 


2 


Lexin.. t on 


7 


Belmont 


7 


Dennis 


4 


Groton 


1 


Ludlow 


2 


Bolton 


1 


Dighton 




Hampden 


1 


Maiden 


— 


Bourne 


2 


Douglas 


4 


ilar?ard 


1 


K&nsf ield 


1 



Maynard 


5 


No •Attlebo rough 


1 


Plainville 


1 


Swamp scott 


1 


Melrose 


7 


Northborough 


1 


Rehoboth 


5 


Towns end 


1 


Millbury 


8 


Northfield 


2 


Rochester 


1 


Warehaa 


1 


Monroe 


2 


Norton 


2 


Russell 


1 


'A'atertown 


1 


Monson 


2 


Palmer 


1 


Sherborn 


2 


'.'estfield 


2 


New Marlborough 


1 


Pax ton 


1 


Shrewsbury 


5 


W. Spring! ield 


14 


New Salem 


1 


Petersham 


2 


Sou thbo rough 


1 


Yhately 


1 


!! bury 


1 


Phillips ton 


1 


Stockbridge 


2 


V.'ilbraham 


1 


Nev?ton 


6 


Pittsfield 


5 


Stonehaa 




Winthrop 


3 


forth Adams 


3 


Plain:! eld 


1 


Stow 


1 


Yarmouth 


--> 
«. 


Their ag-*s 


were as follows: 7 


between 20 arid 30; 


10 


between 30 and 


AC 



22 between 4C and 50; 54 between 50 and 60; 71 between 60 and 70; 28 between 
70 and 30; 2 between 90 and 100; and 2 were unknown. 

For their support there ??as ^aid in 1 case less than -2; in 4- cases i rota 
12 to |3; in 27 cases from $3 to ^ 2 °9 cases — mostly of old and feeble 
persons — the rate varied from |4 to $15 per week according to the amount of 
care required. 

Of the whole number 124 were reported to be in good or fairly good 
physical condition, and 224 in good or fairly good mental condition. In all 
cases they were apparently receiving good care. There were 44 able to do 
light work either in the house or about the premises. In 176 cases, according 
to the reports the enters of the local board c; public yell are complied 
with the law requiring them to visit tries* er-sons at least once in * v- ry six 
ponthsj in 41 cases they were visited once during the year; in 24 cases they 
%ere not vifcited at all. 



DEPFNDF.N? XVIQR CU1LDRPH WITH SBSTLaiEWI PROVIDED PO? 001SIDF I P , 1 Cfi 



As shown by- 


the department 


1 s 


visitation 


the 


1,63 


3 children re— 




ported by th 


<- authorities as tu 


lly 


supported o - ; 


•_sidc 


ths 


tnfiraa'vies on 




January 1, 1 




and July 1, 19 




107 had been 


reiao 


ved 


before vi its c. oi 


d 


be ade, c.nd 


8 v- 


ere su"T)ortiiu2 


the 




elves. The 


rena 


inin*; 1,518 — 808 boys 




and 710 ^irls we 


re sup orted by 


12 


ry 

/ 


cities and 


tov- ns 


as 


i*ol ows : 




Ada -s 


6 


Chico'.jee 




3 


Hanson 




1 


Hilford 


2 


Aga^aci 


2 








H.'. X.± i'^id 




1 


Miilbury 




Ariinr ton 


3 


Dalton 




1 


Hold en 




3 


. "-O Ci ^- o -_2 


1 


Athol 


2 


Danvers 




6 


holyoke 




e 


Nantucket 


2 


Atticboro 


6 


Dediifci2 




3 


Hudson 




i 


Needh.a 


i 


Auburn 


2 


D©€ rf ield 






Hull 




X 


New Bedford 


49 


Bams table 


3 


Dig;: ton 




2 


Ipswich 






Kevburyrort. 




Barre 


- 


r<- s t L rooki* i 


eld 




Lancaster 




■-> 


Sev,'ton 


lj 


Beverly 


U 


Fairhaven 






Lawrence 




6 


i<orth Acaxs 


1 


Bilierica 


3 


Falnouth 




S 


Leicester 




5 


N o • A 1 1 1 > t: :ro-i fc *h 


3 


Bos ton 


950 


Fi tehburg 




7 


Leominster 


12 


No. Heading 


1 


Brai tree 


3 


Poxborough 




1 


hexing -l on 




2 


Sort hbc rough 


2 


Bridgew^ter 


5 


Franiinghaja 




U 


Lowell 




21 


"Norton 


1 


Brockton 


U 


Franklin 




2 


Ludlow 




1 


Horvood 


o 


jrooK- i ^ic 


i 


Gardner 


10 


Lunenburg 




1 


Ps "Iser 


6 


Brook! ine 




G e o r g e t o 




2 


Lynn 

Maiden 






P r ;u DOG}' 


3 


Burlington 


2 


Gloucester 








15 


Pelhaas 


-•^ 


Carver 


4 


Grafton 




1 


Medf ield 




2 


Pea broke 


1 


Charle&ont 


4 


Granville 






Melrose 




2 


Pittsf ield 


4 


Ch* thaa 


2 


Groton 




1 


Hethuen 




1 


Plainville 


2 


Chelsea 




Grov eland 




1 


Hlddlebo rough 


3 


Plymouth 


1 


Cheshire 


2 


Htdley 




1 


Middle ton 




3 


Province town 


1 



Raynham 


1 


Springfield 


1 




3 


r.hately 2 


Reading 


3 


Stonehasi 


3 


fcarehaji 


6 


hitaan l 


Rochester 


2 


Stoughton 


2 


Vi&rren 


1 


Wilbraham 4 


Rockland 


1 


out ton 


1 


?>'atertown 


4 


! .VilliaasstowB 1 


Sal en 


23 


Taunton 


13 


Webster 


6 


Kinchendon j.7 


Seekonk 


d 


Tespleton 


a 


W.Spring- 




Votum 3 










J ield 


1 




Sherborn 


1 


Te^ksoury 


2 


Westfield 


1 


Worcester 133 


Soaervilie 




? is bury 


2 


ifestminst? 


•r 4 


Yarjaouth 1 


fetithborough 


1 


Towns end 


1 


West port 


o 




Sou tab ridge 


5 


Uxbridge 


4 


Weymouth 


14 





Of the whole nursber 136 were cared :'or and tre&t^d in hospit^ Is and 
institutions. There were 1,168 who attended school and 270 w.-\o did sore 
or less work about the house. Of the whole number 1,47;; *ere in food or 
I'&irly good physical condition, and 1,461 in good or fairly good cental 
condition. The rice of board varies from t2 to <5 per v>e>.k» 7i:ese 
children were found to be well cared Tor with a f ev exceptions which have 
been brouj>;;. r it tc the attention oi the local board of public welfare. 



?7 



Dependent *!inor Children wlthEettlement Provided for in 

Infirmaries 



Visits were .ir.de to 133 children - 69 girls and 6l boys - re jrted 

to be cared for by the following cities and towns in their lnTir-Ji&ries: 

B^mstabie, 1 New Bedford, 4 

Boston, 77 Springfield, 2 

Brain tree, 1 V.es thorough, 1 

Fall River, 20 i estf ield, 5 

Fitchburg, L, Worcester, 3 

Hoiyoke, 7 
Hudson, 6 
balden, 2 

Of the number visited 14. are awaiting placement; 1 is awaiting c 
action; 1 is asr&iting transfer to the Division of Child Guardianship; L, 

erfer&ency family evicted from home; 19 have been discharged; 60 
are so defective in nind or body that their retention in an infirmary 
is desirable; and 34- are under 2, or under 3 * ith their aethers, and 
lawful. 



THE PENALTY INCURRED BY CERTAIH CHIT'S AND TO'AMS POP r'AlLUR! TO 5^JC£1 
THT?IR RE7UPHS OK POOR RELIEF DURING THE HOIiTH Oi' APRIL, 1940 



Under sections 32-35 of crapter 117 of the General La«*s, the 
department reported to the Treasurer of the Coanon^e^lth the names 
of the cities and to'.-ns which failed to make th^ir returns oi' poor 
relief during the sonth f April, 1940, together -ith the araount 
of penalty incurred in each instance as follows: ChiLaark, &9.00; 
Dover, $6.00: Dracut, £6.00; Hinsdale, $11.00; Hubbardston, ; 3 . 00 ; 
Euntin^ton, $7.00; Lawrence, $18.00; Leyden, $7.00; Monroe, £A.OO; 
Norfolk, $7.00; Ho. Andover, $2.00; Plainfield, •' 3S.00; Russell, £7. CO; 
Swansea; $8.00; 1' is bury, C41.00; Wilmington, $7.00; North Heading, 1139; 
Total, §361.00. 



SEE FINANCIAL STATEMENT 

in copy in 
COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE 
At Room 36-State House 



40 



PART II 

PRIVATE CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS 
Arthur B. Rotch, Commissioner 
Supervisor* 

[ltl Florence G. Dickson Miss Alice M. Mclntirc 

Miss Mary C. Robinson 
Government supervision of private charitable corporations is provided in 
;hree legislative enactments, the first of which requires the Department of 
>ublic Welfare to investigate all applications for charitable charters, whila 
he second and third call for annual Inspection and annual reporting* In the 
.ollowing pages of this part of the report the functions of the department and 
the year's work under these several statutes are explained. This statement is 
followed by a tabulation of some of the essential figures showing the financial 
;ondition and the number of persons aided by the various charities* 

Investigation of Charitable Organizations Seeking Incorporation 
General Laws (Ter. Ed,) chapter 180, section 6, provides that the department 
ihall investigate, give a public hearing, and report its findings to the Secretar 
>f the Commonwealth, in all cases of charitable organizations which seek a cer- 
tificate of incorporation. During the year ending November 30, 194-0, 53 appli- 
:ations for charters have been referred under the provisions of this statute, 
rhe department has completed its Investigation, given hearings and reported 
m 51 applications, including 11 received prior to the beginning of the year. 

Action has been taken by the Secretary/ of the Commonwealth on 51 applica- 
tions as listed below. Forty-four (44) of these petitions have been granted 
sind charters issued, while 7 have been refused, 

Arlington Social Service League, Inc. 
Asthma Research Foundation, Inc. 

Barnstable Massachusetts Committee for the Care of Children from 

Barnstaple England, Inc., The 
Belmont Girl Scouts, Incorporated 
Boy Scouts of America, Berkshire Council, Inc. 
Brookline Anti-Tuberculosis Society, Inc. 
Camp Allbridge, Incorporated 

9( 



Camp As Inner e. Inc. 

Camp Stella Maris, Inc. 

Captain Charles Leonard House, Inc., The 

C.C. Griffin Home for Aged Couples and Aged Men Inc. 

Cercle Loyal des Dames et Demoiselles Franco-Americaines de So. 

Lawrence, Mass., Le 
Charter Club, Inc. 
Christmas Arcade, inc. 
Civic Patrol of Gloucester, Inc., The 

Community Young Men 1 s Christian Association of Greenfield, Mass., The 

David Memorial Nursing Home 

Faro Club (Incorporated) 

Friends of Young Judaea, Inc. 

German Legion of Lawrence, Incorporated 

Girl Scout Council of Greater Lynn, Inc., The 

Gloucester Artillery Associates, Inc. 

Greenfield Community Chest, Incorporated 

Harvard Committee to Aid German Student Refugees, Inc., The 

Human Engineering Laboratory, Incorporated 

Italian Women* s Club of Pittsfield 

Jewish Family Welfare Association, The 

Kenmore Hospital, Inc. 

Klwanis Club of Northampton, Inc. 

Kiwanis Club of Roslindale-West Roxbury Incorporated 
Knights and Ladies of Kaleva, Inc. 

Legion Ambulance Fund Incorporated of Randolph 

Massachusetts Department, Sons of Union Veterans of the Civil War 
Mediord Post No. 45, American Legion, Home Building Association, Inc. 
Mothers Helping Hand, Incorporated 

Mount Trinity Religious, Educational and Charitable Association 

National Acadian Club, incorporated, The 

New England Division of the American Jewish Congress 

Oakland Building Associates, Inc., The 

Pan-El eian Federation of America, The 

Particular Council of Fall River Society of St. Vincent de Paul 

Paul Reveres of 1938 and 1939, Inc. 

Rockne Association, Inc., of Brockton 

Societa* St. Anna de West Springfield, Inc. 

Somerville Teachers' Club Scholarship Fund, Inc. 

South End Community Center of Springfield, Inc. 

Southern Brookline Community Center 

Warren Committee, Inc. 

Weymouth Community Service, Inc., The 

Weymouth Post 79 Department of Massachusetts, The American Legion, Inc. 
Yankee Division Veterans Association 



Supervision of Charitable Corporations 
General Laws (Ter. Ed.) chapter 121, section 7, requires the Department 
f Public Welfare, upon the request or with the consent of a charitable corpora- 
ion, to make annual inspection or investigation of such corporation. 

During the past year supervision of incorporated charities has been con— 
inued through visits and conferences by the supervision. There have been 197 



inspections involving many consultations and visits to institutions. 

There have been 751 inquiries regarding particular charities and general 
natters related to the field of private charity. 

Number and Classification of Incorporated Charities in Massachusetts 
Of the 1,405 charitable corporations which made returns to this department 
luring 1940, 131 are homes for the aged; 141 are hospitals, sanatoria and other 
Institutions for the sick; 146 are nursing societies and other health agencies; 
267 are agencies giving family service and relief; 134 are child-serving 
agencies; 185 are youth agencies; 95 are settlements and neighborhood centres; 
and 108 are federations, foundations, and community chests. The remaining 198 
form a miscellaneous group chiefly civic or eleemosynary in their nature. 

Annual Reports of Charitable Corporations 

General Laws (Ter.Ed.) chapter 180, section 12, provides that a charitable 
corporation incorporated within this Commonwealth must make to this department 
in annual financial return on or before the first day of November in each year, 
.nd further provides that if any corporation fails for two successive years to 
take the report, the Supreme Court may decree its dissolution. Figures from the 
inancial reports of corporations for the last year are given on the following 
>ages. The abstracts are arranged by towns in alphabetical order under each 
-own. 

An analysis of the returns made in 1940 showed the total property, real anr 
ersonal, of all these charities to be $40(7,798,838. Subscriptions and donations 
mounted to $23,109,636. Earnings and refunds, including receipts from benefi- 
iaries, were $30,151,390. Receipts from interest and dividends on investments 
otaled $9,654,466. Legacies were received to the amount of $5,878,747. Total 
urrent receipts were $64,170,422. Total current expenditures were $61,109,616. 
otal paid for salaries and wages, $24,852,607. 

Corporations Dissolved 

In 1940, 8 corporations were dissolved by a decree of the Supreme Court. 

13 ' 



e list follow* t- 

Academy of Medicine, Inc. 

Boston Hungarian Rifke Benais Jerusalem, Inc. 
Daughters of Zion Old Peoples Home 
Governor John A* Indrew Home Association 
Italian Legion Auxiliary, Boston Unit Number One 
Lithuanian National Catholic Vytautas Old Folds' Home, Inc. 
Mayor's Relief Committee Inc. 
Social Welfare League Inc. of Taunton, The 

Registration of Foreign Charitable Corporations 
General Laws (Ter # Ed.) chapter 180, section 12A, requires a charitable 
corporation incorporated elsewhere than in Massachusetts, which engages in 
charitable work or raises funds within the Commonwealth, to file with the 
department (l) a true copy of its charter or certificate of incorporation, 
(2) a true copy of its constitution and by-laws, and (3) an annual report on or 
before Novembei* first. Approximately 75 foreign corporations are complying with 
the law. 

Ho Endorsement of Private Charitable Organizations 
The Department of Public Welfare endorses no private charitable organixatior 
or agency. This rule is absolute, regardless of the known standing of any such 
society. Inspection and the publication of the annual return in this volume do 
not mean approval; on the contrary, inspection may mean the discovery of condi- 
tions calling for condemnation. No agency is warranted, therefore, in using 
the fact of inspection in such maimer as to lead the public to believe that 
the department approves or in any sense commends its work. 



SEE 

BUREAU OF INCORPORATED CHARITIES 
FOR 

ABSTRACT OF RLFORTS OK 
CHABI TABLE CORPORATIOSS 



THE CITY AND TOY/N 1NFIRMAKIES 
and 

Gii/iiSTics o: poor relief 

G. Frank *cixmald, imp ervi sine inspector of Infiroaries 
Laws Relating to Infirmaries 
(General La*s, -nspter Jfl ; Tercentenar; Edition) 

For the information of boards oi public welfare, supo, -into dents oi 
lnf irniaries and others concerned, certain iav?s r^li. ting to infirmaries 
are :ere sui^arized . 

The De^&rt'nent of Public -elf a re is required to visit annually all 
city and to?»n inf iraaries, and to include in its annuel report a sti t it 
of their condition and nanagcsient, with its suggestions and recon. •cndations 
relative thereto. (General Laws, cn. 121, sect. 7.) 

The superinte dent csf every infirmary .^ust keep a register, in the 
lorn prescribed by the Department of Public V. elf are, of the nanes of the 
persons received or coaaitted, the cities or towns to which they .>e'. or.g, 
and t.ie dates f t.:eir reception and discharge. (General La&s, ch. 4-7, 
sect. 8.) 

Lvery innate of an infirmary able to work shall be kept diligently 
employed in labor. If he is idle and does not perfors such r^asonarie task 
as is assigned, or if he is stubborn and cisorderly, h' shall be -unished 
according to the orders and regulations- established by the direetrrs« 
(.General Laws, ch. 117, s*cts. /.I and 22. See also spin! on 02 2 tioraey- 
Generai given to State ^oard sf Charity, l.over.bcr 21,1904.) 

The >nly children r/no can be lawfully supported in a cit; or town 
Infiraary for a period :i aore than two aonths are: (1) those r.ose 
physical condition is such as to malic such action necessary or desirable; 
and (2) tnose who are under three years of age, with aothers who are 
infiraary inmates and suitable •rsons to a id i n taking care of thea. 

4C 



(General Lavs, ch.^7, sect. II.) In cases of failure of boards of 
puMlc welfare to remove children illegally in infirmaries, tr.e De- 
partment of Public Welfare is required to re iove then end provide for 
then otherwise, at the expense of the city or tcv.n concerned. (General 
Laws, ch. 117, sects. 36 and 37.) 

Provision is raade that trattps and vagrants, if physically able, 
shall perform labor of so:.e hind, and shall be lodged under conditions 
prescribed by the State Department of Public Health. (General L&'vs, ch. 
117, sect. 20.) 

The Department of Public welfare is authorized to advise and 
assist local boards of public welfare in preparation of plans for in.ir 
aary buildings. (General La*s, ch. 121, sect. 33.) 



47 



Inspection of Infirmaries 

Th- re rre in Massachusetts today 108 infirmaries which cared for 
10,171 persons during the ast municipal year. There has been no 
material change iroa the previous year. As required by law, every 
Infirmary as been i speeded by the department, ^.ov.i of thea se era! 
times. Conferences have been held with various tannic i pal >fficers, 
mayors of cities, and special committees, concc^uir.-g matters of 
importance relative to the management and administration of infirmaries 
or for the discus ion of improvements or new construction. 

Infirmaries Closed 

During the past municipal year four infirmaries - Easton, Hanson, 
Holliston, and Ipswich - have been closed and the inmates boarded 
in other nfirmaries and private no..es. 

New Construction 

Holyoke is contemplating the erection o: a new infirmary which sill 
include a ospital section. The present structure has outlived its 
usefulness and Mayor Toefert is determined to find ways and ;oans t 
build a modem one. 

Reco.nnend&tions * 

The sweeping changes of the ast . ev< years, which are so rapidly 
modifying our methods of relief and dependency, have not greatly 
affected the infirmaries. Just what place this ancient institution 
is to occupy in our program of social and economic security is a question 
to which we . eve devoted little thourht. \ ith the setup now in the 



Commonwealth for caring for the aged, for dependent children, the 
unemploy d, and the hospitalization of the insane and feebleminded 
and ather croups, it seem3 appropriate to s~e where, if at all, they 1 it 
into the -^icture. 

Quite a few comriuni ties Lave declared that their Infirmaries no 
longer have a function, that they have become larg eiy institutions ^or 
the indigent a*:ed who can be aided by the Old Age Assistance Law. It is 
also claimed that they ':iave becoae too expensive to operate, Therefore, the 
tiae se ms to be \ articuiarly ripe for careful study and evaluation of 
the infirmaries. 

The Old Age Assistance La% has nad very little effect on reducing ■ e 
number af :ersons be irig supported in infirmaries. In the Lowell Infirm^r,. 
during 1.9 A-^ there were 578 persons supported, and out 2 this number only 
two were granted old age assistance. This is typical. Our observation 
has impressed us that the old age assistance "rogran cannot he expected 
to do away with inf irm&ri es. 

Consideration must be given to the fact that fully 90p of tie inmates 
in an infirmary today represent cases where institutional care is essential! 
best for thes. It is true that they have beer ; es one for the aged, and 
as would be expected *ith seat of the inmates suffering froa ills incident 
to old age, ade uate nursing care is essential. v.hile the larger infirmaries 
do supply ade uate nursing care, the smaller ones, on the other hand, 
provide none. Infirmaries v.- i thou* skilled nursing care should either 
hospitalize or board tneir chronic or Incurable inmates in Infirmaries 
that have this facility. 

Per capita costs in a preat raany small Infirmaries are excessive. 
This is due itainly to the small number of inmates. Not only is the cost 
of maintaining a snail infirmary high, but the J egrec o: car- provided 
for the inmates can he criticised adversely. It can be sumaed up tn the 

11 



statement that the small infirmary robably provides the poorest kind 
of c&rf at the highest cost. In the centre! nart f the Comsem ealth 
a small ini'iraary Mas a per capita cost of C20.G0 weekly, and the con- 
ditions in it ar-: deplorable. There can be no Justification * or the 
continuance this infirSary. 

When an infirmary reduces the nuabor of its innat^s to the point 
•where maintenance costs are disproportionate, it world appear to be c g 
policy *o con icier joint ownership with surrounding to«ns having the s&ae 
problem and to a^intain a central infirmary. Permissive la* for t is 
arrangement is contained in chapter 47 9 section 5, of the General I*a~<s. 
A splendid example of this is the Charlton Associates, Our inf iraaries 
are fulfilling a needed function in our social program, and no substitute 
has as yet been found for them. They represent the principle of local 
responsibility for the care of its indigent poor, but sound Judgment oust 
be used in devising other means of caring for them when it is apparent that 
custodial care is best for them end for the community. Accepted &$ necessary 
they should be combined where practicable and improved with every facility 
for the humane care of the aged. 

Improvements 

Adams, main building rewired and new fixtures, new toilets with tiled 
floors, and interior redecorated. Aaesbury, new heating plant* Andover, 
bam re shingled, new linoleum in kitchen*. Athol, painting* Barre, nen 
water system, roofs repaired. Billerica, electrical work, nr.- v.- plumbing* 
Boston, ne* dormitory. Concord, barn painted, Fasthaapton, buildings 
reroofed and painted, new garage. Fairhaven, heating plant overhauled. 
Fall River, interior redecorated, t*o new refrigerators, rebuilt two 
suaier houses. Fitchburg, new kitchen. Greenfield, interior redecorated. 

lOo 



Haverhill, general repairs. Leominster, redecorated throughout. Lowell, 
new floors in hospital, interior of hospital redecorated. Lynn, interior 
redecorated, rianchestor, general repairs. Mansfield, nev mattresses, 
interior redecorated. Marblehead, new oil burner, nev. coment *<ali s. 
Gilford, new water system. Mouson, redecorating interior. Nantucket, 
general repairs. Newburyport, Seating plcnt overhauled. North Andover, 
general repairs. North Brookfleld, new heating plant. Pembroke, new 
washing machine. Pittsfield, plumbing and heating systems overhauled. 
Plymouth, interior redecorated. Cuincy, nev beds. Sale:::, redecorating 
interior. Spencer, painting, new ceilings. Springfield, painting of floors 
and walls in. hospital, ne^ greenhouses for starting plants, painting of 
exterior of all buildings, electric plant overhauled, repaying of roads, 
furniture and beds painted. Stonehan, ne« pair ol worses, three bathrooms 
tiled. ^turbridge, new heating plant, interior redecorated. Taunton, 
general repairs. Upton, house reshingled. Oxbridge, exterior redecorated. 
Wakefield, new refrigerator, new boiler, new dormitory, laundry, smoking 
rocs, and interior redecorated. \ althan, root cellar, new -dumbing. Water- 
town, general repairs, ftestboro, net? bathroom. Westport, reroof ing, new 
refrigerator, new steam pipes and radiators installed throughout. & Inchon* 
don, new heating boiler, n^w room on infirmary. ?-oburn, nevr lire al<.rm 
system, interior redecorated, new fire-escape. Worcester, improvements 
of major nature too numerous to mention* Charlton Associates, net root 
storehouse, new refrigerator. / 

Infirmary Visitors 

The infirmary visitors are local residents giving their services under 
the Commissioner's appointment. Tliose in office no*.r are: Adams, hrs. h. E. 
Davis; Andover, Mrs. Frank. L. Brigh&m; Boston, Miss Theresa M. Lally; 
Easthanpton, Mrs. K. J. O'Neill; Fall River, Sirs. Joseph F. Tar re; 

/or 



Fitchburg, Mrs. Elizabeth Crocker and Mrs. T. R. Shea; Greenfield, Mrs. 
Henry F. Nash; Holyoke, Mrs. Catherine A. Love Joy and Mrs. Ellen Woolfson; 
Manchester, sirs. Grace L. Porter; Marlboro, Mrs. L. H. Tourtellotte; 
Monson, -irs. Ruby Blodgett; Montague, ilrs. Richard R. Lyman; flantucket, 
Miss Mildred H. Brooks; Menburyport, !£rs. Frederick Tigh; North Adams, 
Mrs. Lida A. Kimball and Miss lone Northrup; liorth Attiehoro, Mrs. 
Henrietta Livingston; Northampton, Miss Clara C. Allen; Pi*,tsfield, 
Uiss Frances D. Robbins; Soaerville, Mrs* Marguerite F. Eauler; Springfield, 
Mrs. Laura Longdon and Mrs. Katherine R. Hatch; '.townsend, Mrs. Janes k. 
Bennett; "v'altham, Irs. Anna Fogg; Kare, Mr. John R. Canpion; Warren, 
Mrs. Edna beland.. 



SFF CHART IN COMMISSIONER'S OFFICE 
TABULATED INFORMATION RELATING TO INFIRMARIES 



/ 



STATISTICS OF POOR BELIEF 

Numbers Believed 

The following information covers sublic relief whet) sr 
rendered in institutions or outside, ani aid rendered by ail public 
agencies, whether State or local. The total number of ersons ; ided 
appears in Table I, alone. The regaining tables an* lyze by age, sex 
and nativity, the number of rsons on General Relief only, ooitting those 
aided by reason of unemployment, and the tabulations are concluded by 
figures for cost of all relief. 

Table I shows the number supported or relieved by the ei s 
and towns during the year b* ginning April 1, 1929, and ending March } 
1943. All persons are included, regardless of settlement. The total rub- 
ber receiving aid in any Torn, exclusive of vagrants and wayfarers as 
617,752. Of this number, 387, 4^9 were aided on account of uneapioya :.t, 
mostly in t heir own hoses. The remainder, 230,263, were aided as foliowss- 
20,^99 in institutions, and 209,764 outside, either in private lani^ies 
or in their own hones. Of the persons aided in institutions, 8,935 ?-ere 
relieved in the various city^u. town in^'irriaries, leaving 11,564 who 
*ere cared for in other institutions. It should be noted that certain 

cities which have city hospitals have not reported ersons aided therein 
under "poor relief Of the outside aid. 7.14? cases were aided in ri vate 

v 

faaiiies ther tlian their ov>n, *..hile 58,069 were reported as having been 
aided in their own ho^es. This last figure comprises practically all city 
and town aid usually iinor.-n as local public out-door relief, except a7,113 t . 
to Dependent Children recipients and 97,430 Old Age Assistance recipients. 

Table II supplies the data Tor persons aided or relieved by i t 
Consonreaith. In addition to aid rendered directly by the Cocusonv-ealth, 



this table includes cases in which the relief has been rendered by the 
several cities and tovros in the first Instance and those cities and towns 
have been reinbursed by the Coamonwealth. 

Table III shows the aovement of the :x>puI&.tion in the dependent 
group during the year, (See foot note.) As previously explained, it should 
be reaeabered that persons aided by reason of unearloynmt and Aid to 
Dependent Children end Old Age Assistance cases are excluded fro:: this table 
and the following tables. The persons who passed out of care during the 
year number 33*655. ?nose in this total released by death number 2,120 
and 31,535 persons sore transferred. At the close of the year, therefore, 
the Coasonwealth aad 52,060 persons remaining In this group. 

Tabie IV begins classification of the number ~jL these ■ ersons by colo 
nativity and sex. .f the 85*715 persons so aided, 4.2,779 were sales and 
12,936 feaales. The native-torn whites — 33,405* nuaber aore than three tiae 
the foreign bom of the white races. 

Table V gives a farther analysis of the native-born ocrsons 
aided duri..g the year classified by parent nativity. The parents of 
25,701 were both native; 17,494 ^ere children of foreign-bora parents; 
12,449 *ere parents one of whoa «as foreign-born or unknown; while the 
nativity of parents In 4*460 cases remained unascertained. It arrears, 
therefore, that of the 85,715 persons receiving this aid during the year, th 
were it least 42,373 "ho were either foreign-born or were of the first 
|eneration in our citizenship. , 

By Table II it appei rs that of th« 45,715 persons analyzed, 
4,53a vere under five; 19*45^ fcere under fifteen; ::7,432 re re under twenty; 
35,743 were between twenty and sixty; and 21,410 were over that age, Fhe 
ages of 1,020 crere unknown. 

Among the poor persons relieved there Is always a considerable 



/Of 



nuaber of mental defectives who for one reason or another hAve rot been 
committed and ere therefore not cared for in the special institutions such 
as the mental hospitals maintained for that purpose. In regard to this 
class it is to be noted further that since no court has passed upon their 
uental condition, their classification is aade here because, in the opinion 
of the respective authorities aaking the returns, th-.-re is no doubt of t..-.-ir 
defect. Table VII affords a classification into three groups, according to 
the nature f the defect, and a di vision by sex. The total number thus 
car*. d for was 197, naaeiy 9* -.ales and 105 fenales. 0m hundred sixty-six 
(166) o- these cases were r» a liev.d by cities and to* ss; the regaining 31, 
having no settlement, were aided at the expense of the CosTiOnvreal th« 
Fifty-eig t (?S) of the vhole nursber were classed as " insane" racstiy the 
senile and mildly insane to be found in the infirmaries. This total Includes 
21 males and 37 females. One hundred live (105) «f>re called -idiotic", 
naaeiy 5C r.ales and 55 females. The epileptics totaled 34, o: whoa 21 sere 
males and 13 females. 

Table VIII calls attention raore pointedly to the sex and nature 
of discharge froa relie:' oi those persons who passed out of aid d iring the 
year. Of the 33, 65> cases so dismissed, 17,664. ^ere sales and 15,791 were 
females. Those released to the care of relatives or friends numbered 3,637; 
transferred to other institutions 1,761, and discharged without relatives or 
f riends or oth% r authorities agreeing to look after then, .10,937. The 
gr«-at siajority In this last group ". ere -e^sons assisted through illness, 
after which they be cane self-supporting again. 

As appears i'ro;a Table IX the foreign born r.ho »ere r^cei^ing 
public relief during the year number 24,379* Canada furnishes 7,737 of tnis 
number; England and Pales, 1,399; Gemany, 256; Ireland, 4,107; Italy, 3,5-0; 
Russia and Poland, 2,696; Gcandinrvia, 693; Scotland, 4lS> anJ all other 
countries, 4,053. 

tor 



Table X shows the percentage of the various classes to the 
whole number. Thus, of the 35,715 persons analyzed, 72.7 per cent were 
settled cases and 27.3 per cent were unsettled. As to the place in which 
relief was given, 23.91 per cent of the total were aided in institutions, 
namely 10.42 per cent in infirmaries^ 5»77 per cent in sttte institutions 
and 7.72 per cent in otrer institutions, mostly under private aanageaent. 
Outdoor relief, designated as aid "outside," was given in 76.09 per cent 
of all the cases, iost of these, namely, 67.75 per cent, were relieved 
in their own h:>mes. Aid «as given in private families other than the 
recipient's own — mostly boarded cases — in 8.5/, per cent instances. Per- 
centages of age show that 33.67 per cent were mi.ors, 40.09 per cent were 
between the ages f twenty-one and sixty, and 24. 9£ per cent v/ere sixty or ov€ 
The ages of 1.26 per cent were unknown. Sexes differ slightly, males 

rating 49.91 per cent and females 50.09 per cent. Ihe number of colored 
persons fcas very small, totaling only 2.70 per cent. 

By reason of excellent supervision in the care cf deiectives, 
the percentage of those mentally deficient persons still cared for as poor 
relief cases is exceedingly small, and tends always to decrease. The 
mental condition of all the gases analyzed shows that 99.77 per cent were 
sane, .07 per cent were insane, .12 per cent were idiotic and .©4 per cent 
were epileptic. 

It is of further interest to vi^w at a glance tne numerical 
relation to the whole population of the persons relieved at public expense 
as analyzed in Table XI, which exhibits the number or each class in every 
thousand of the population of the Commonwealth on a basis of the census 
of 1940. Thus it is shown that in each thousand of the population tnere 
were 143.1 indigent persons relieved at public expense. The number 
analyzed — i.e., General Relief cases, excluding persons aided because of 



unemployment, were 19.86 in a thousand. Of these, 9.91 were rales und 
9.95 were females. The native born numbered 13.92 in the thousand) 
foreign bom, 5.77; native born of foreign parentage, 4.05; and those of 
unknown nativity, .17. The proportion of vagrant3 reported r-as $.70 in 
the thousand. 

Cost of °oor Relief 

The funds expended by the cities and to. ns .or ail poor relief 
within the fiscal .car are s .own in Table XII. The aggregate is classified 
as "ordinary" or .maintenance, and n ex t re ordinary n or veciai. Toget er «i 
the ordinary outlays are s:.own the recepits on account ?f .saint an^nce, and 
the difference s< t out under "net ordinary expenditures The /•rdi..ary 
outlay is classified as expenses in institutions and outside. T«e subdiyis 
follows the classification in Table I regarding the nature ana lace of aid 
Ihe grand total in Table XII shows tnat an aggregate of §67,423,46-4 .92 v.as 
laid out by th< several cities and towns. Of this sr.:-, S67,>39, 303*20 was 
ordinary utlay, ,r maintenance, an increase of 12,648,496.06 over last 
year; the remainder, or $36,661.72, *as expended for sundry improvements 
at tne city and to.-u iruirti^ries. Of the raoney expended for maintenance, 
f 2,i.49,I34.14 -as expended i'or infirmary care and *1, 495, 496. 98 l or relief 
in other institutions. Care in private faiailies too;: §315,932*21 aid 
relief the r.:ciai jnts 1 ov^n nones, i.e., outdoor poor relief, totaled 
$23,323,325.90. Tne sua of f_%659,^2^yb v-as expended Tor old Are Assis- 
tance, an increase „u" S3,33£,3;>3.33 o.<;r 1939. The figure for outdoor 
re :ef Jho* s a decrease of ?1,S>4, 647.8;: over the revious year. The suu 
of ^7,32^, > ^6.14 *?as expend :c for Aid to Dependent Ciidren. This 
expend! tn re sho s an inert vse of £1,^92,0-6.50. The cost of administra- 
tion, inciudin£ ;>i--iary and office expenses of the local public welfare 
boards, cane to £2,820, 769. 23. The total recti, ts on account of . r.- L iary 



/o7 



expenditures were $33,254,061.18— classified as receipts on account 

of inf irnaries, £205,412.99 and all other, $33,048,648.19. Subtracting 

receipts leaves -*34, 135, 742.0;: as the net ordinary outlay. 

In Table XIII the analysis shown for cities i.nd tovms by 
Table XII is carried out for cases aided out of the State funds. Of the 
23,829,400.23 expended for this purpose, $23,821,333.79 was on account 
of ordinary expenditures, laid out as follows: at the State Infirmary, 
f 832,798. 28, at the State Para, 1596.38, at the Massachusetts hospital 
School, 1*46,977.04 and all other expenditures outside of institutions, 
$22,240,962.09. Extraordinary expenditures totaled $&»066*44, all ex- 
pended for special improvements at the several institutions ,<ust enumer- 
ated* Inasmuch as it is impossible to trace institution expenditures 
to the separate individuals receiving the aid, the figures set out under 
the State tables of cost are arrived at by taking iros the net cost of 
aaintonance that proportion which the average nunber relieved in the 
institution bears to the average inmate population of the institution. 

In Table XIV State and local outlays are added, showing that 
of the $57,258,042.12 expended for public poor relief, $57,211,313.96 
was for ordinary outlays, of which $3,874,353.57 went for institutional 
relief and f 50,516,191.16 was for relief outside. The total of extra- 
ordinary expenditures was £46,723.16. 



/or 



/ 



SEE CHARTS LS CO&dlSSIO^lFR 1 S OFFICE 



Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during 
the Year ending March 31, 1940 



Cost to Cities and Towns of Supporting and Relieving 
Poor Persons in Institutions, in Private Families, and 
in their 0?na Homes. (In most cases the reports are for 
the fiscal year ending Dec. 31, 1939) 



Massachusetts. Dept. of Publi 

Welfare . 
Annual report. 1941. 



MR 

361M3 

S79r 

1941 



RECEIVED AT 
PRINTING OKflCC 



COMMISSI UN AOWnttTHA I MR 
AftDfUMNU 

wr. Pag# 

Advisory Board 1 

Commissioner's Report..... • 2-4 

Division of Aid and Relief 5 

Report, Division of Aid and Belief......... 6-7 

Subdivision of Settlements. .. • • 8 

Audit 9 

Romovals • ••••• • ••••••••••••• 10 

Supervision of Wayfarers Lodges and Cheap Lodging Houses. ....... .11 

Subdivision of Social Service..... 12-18 

Subdivision of Appeals.......... .••••.....•,•.19-25 

Bureau of Research and Statistics. • • 26-32 

Licensed Boarding Hoses for Aged Persons. •••••••••••••• ••••••••• 33-36 

Civilian Conservation Corps. ....... 37-33 

Commodity Distribution Division • 39-49 

Division of Child Guardianship. •............•.....••..• 50-75 

State Board of housing................... 76 

Division of Juvenile Training. 76 

Institutions under the Department............................... 76-77 

Supervision of Institutions. •••••• •••.»•••.••••••• • 77 

Tables I-Y 

The County Training Schools 78-79 

Supervision of the Settled Poor Relieved or Supported by 

Cities and Towns............ 80-82 

Dependent fiinor Children with Settlement Provided for 

Outside Infirmaries.......... • 83-.S4 

The Penalty Incurred by Certain Cities and Towns for 

Failure to Make Their Returns of Poor Relief 

During the Month of April, 1941 85 

Financial Statement of the Department for the Fiscal Tear 

ending November 30, 1941... 86 



Part II 

Private Charitable Corporations............ 87-90 

Abstracts of Reports on Charitable Corporations 91 



Part III 

City and Town Infirmaries and Statistics of Poor Relief 92 

Inspection of Infirmaries. • ••••••••••••••••.•••••.. 92-91 

Tabulated Information Relating to Infirmaries 95-97 

Statistics of Poor Relief 98-103 



Table I— -lumber of Poor Person* Supported or Relieved during the 
Tear ending March 31, 1941 

Table II — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved by the State 
In Institutions, in Private Families and in their 
Own Hoses, during the year ending March 31, 1941 

Table IIXvMovement during the Tear ending March 31, 1941 of the 
Poor Supported or Relieved 

Table IV — Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the 
Tear ending March 31, 1941, Classified by Color, 
Nativity and Sex 

Table Y— Number of dative-bom Poor Persons Supported or Relieved 
during the Tear ending March 31, 1941, classified 
by Parent Nativity 

Table 71— Number of Poor Persons Supported or Relieved during the 
Tear ending March 31, 1941 Classified by Present Age 

Table VII -Number of Mentally Impaired Persons Supported or Relieved 
as Poor Persons during the year ending March 31,1941, 
Classified by Mental Defect and by Sex 

Table vTII-Sumber of Poor Persons Discharged from Support or Relief 
During the Year ending March 31, 1941, Classified 
by Character of Discharge and Sex 

Table IX Number of Foreign-born Persons who Received Public Welfare 

during the Tear ending March 31, 1941, Classified by 
Countries of Birth 

Table X Percentage of the Various Classes of Persons Relieved at 

Public Expense during the Tear ending March 31, 1941, 
to the Whole Number so Relieved 

Table XI Numerical Relation to the l^hole Population of the Several 

Classes of Persons Relieved at Public Expense during 
the Tear ending liarch 31, 1941 

Table XII — Cost to Cities and Towns of Supporting and Relieving 
Poor Persons in Institutions, in Private Families, 
and in their Own Homes 

Table XIII-Net Cost to the State of Supporting and Relieving Poor 
Persons to Institutions and In Families 

Table XIY — fotal Net Cost of Public Poor Relief in Massachusetts 
during the Tear ending March 31, 1941 



Lavs Affecting the Department Passed by Legislature of 1941 



104-107 



Tfflt COMMCeTVIALIH 07 HASSACHUSB^fS 
DSPABTMBTT 07 PUBLIC VKL7AKI 
Arthur 9. Rotch, Ceanlaeioner 

To the Honorable Senate end louse of Hepre sen tat West 

Ths Twenty-second Annual Report of the Departaent of 
Public Velf -re, covering the /ear froa December 1, 1940* 
to Boreaher 30, 1941, le herewith respectfully presented* 



Members of the A<iyi*)ry ^So^rd of the Den'irt'wmt c* Pnblie welfare 



Date of Originil 



Appointment 



fr* me 



Residence 



Date of 
Expiration 



12/1/35 
12/1/38 
12/1/35 
6/26/40 
U/l/39 
1/10/40 



K*ry W. Boherte 
tfrrjsrie R. Stoneasn 
Trader! ok P. Sonata 
"• ?*sr H. $b«=les 
^.▼id if, Armstrong 
Robert Cutler 



Helton 
Brsokline 
Bop ton 
Vt»rceeter 
tfercester 
Bop ton 



Jan. 31, 1942 

Dec. 1. 1941 

Jan. 31, 1943 

Jan. 31, 1943 

Jan. 31, 1944 

Jan. 31, 1944 



TUB TSX TUB FJ*BI2ra HOTEtfBEB, 1941 



The year 1941 *as a very active year for the Department of Public 
Welfare, but free one roint of vie* it was one of the saddest years that 
the De pertinent has known for a long ttae because it sarlced the death of 
itr* Fra«& W* Goodhue, who for forty-one years had served the Departeteat so 
well and since 1920 was the Director of the Division of Aid and Relief* 
&r* Goodhue died on ksrch 6, 1941 and his loss was mounted by everybody 
in the De-^artseut of Public Welfare as veil as by hosts of friends in the 
local boards of iTublie welfare with shorn he had had such close contact for so 
aeny years* B* was kno*n throughout the nation in public welfare >.Uerg and 
had served with important co^lttees in connection «ith the A&erican Public 
Welfare Association* I think it can he said for every Commissioner tl*at he 
served under that he was a great source of strength and his else counsel 
kept the Department always on an even keel* 

I appointed Mr* folio A* Barnes to succeed Mr* Goodhue as Director of 
the Division of Aid and Belief and his appointment was confirmed by the 
Governor and Council and he assumed his duties on y&rch 2JL, 1941* Although 
a young asn, his experience as Agent of the local Board of Public Welfare in 
Hinghfea gave him a fine understanding and we all lo-:k forward to rs&ny yeara 
of valuable and useful service til our field* 

There was a lom and active Legislative session in 1941 an3 the Depart- 
cent had many inoortant bills asaong «hich was the revision of the old age 
assistance la* which created two Kinisuas—a sinlsua of $30 for individuals 
living in a f&aULy group and $40 for those living alone* It was fasntiened 
In the 1940 report that a till would be suhaitted to the legislature to 



vslidste the -erit system set up by the Cftsnlssloner and Placing all the 
local city and town employees connected with old age assistance and aid to 
dependent children under the Civil Service lave. Shortly after this cn 
action was brought alnst the 'Ccosaiss loner and the Director of Civil &<?rvicc 
that in efi'ect said that the establishment of the serlt system w&s b^ond 
the rule-staking authority of fcfc~ DepartEumt. The esse was heard be/ ore a 
master, then & judge af the Superior Court, and finally It went to t^e Suprcne 
Court* The decision of the Supreme Court fttste4 that the CosekIss loner un- 
doubtedly exceeded his powers In establishing the serit system, but is Yie* 
of th* fact that the Legislature had validated the Act, the individuals 
concerned were under Civil Service ami therefore there was no further action 
that could be taken. 

The /ear witnessed the appointment froe Civil Service lists of th« Chief 
Supervisor of Social Service and seven Public Welfare District Supervisors 
which finally coarieted the reorganisation as p leaned by Sr. Armstrong in 1939* 

Another important act passed by the Legislature ess the authorise t Son 
for the Cassias loner to sake a contract with the Federal Sovemssst to handle 
Surplus Coesjodities forseriy administered under the W. P* A. end the organiza- 
tion of the stasp plan on a r&tner wide basis in th*» state* This -et 
witn. great Cevqt and gave to the people a feeling of self-reiiMice Its th£t they 

could go to the stores £tnd buy through the regular channels of trade rather vha; 

/ 

to stand in line to receive the direct distribution of commodities. 

The rear 1941 again sharked a very definite <!o*n*?ard trend in the nusbor 
of people on General Relief la the st*%te. At the beginning o;' tike year there 
were 52,753 on General Belief rolls end in December, there were 35,552. The 
total aoney spent for General Kellef was §12,625, 324 as coanared to §20,184*201 
in 1940. This downward trend reflected the activity because of the war. 

Old Age Assistance increased Wery slightly in the nu»ber and in the aeount 



3 



of eonay spent. This wes also trot of Aid to Dependent Children. Duo 
to the continued fine cooperation of the cities and towns and th^lr rela- 
tionship el th the State Department, the quality of the administration and 
the standard a coBtir.ued to in prove during this last year. 

Again the Coasii s sio;ier wishes to thank every person eonr.ee ted with 
and interested in public welfare for his fine cooperation. 



DIVISION OP AID AID RELIEF 
Rollo A. Barnes, Director 



The Division of Aid and Relief includes four subdivisions: 

Subdivision of Settlements, Subdivision of Supervisory Service, 
Subdivision of Social Service to Tewksbury, Subdivision of 
Appeals. 

The reports of the supervisors of these subdivisions are 
herewith submitted. 



The Mvltitt euf fsred * treuendoue loos U the pwtlnj of Mr. Frank W. 
Ooodhue, Its Director sinoe its imtlw in 1919 and previously Superintendent 
of State Adult Poor fro* lilt* lit devotion to duty, Ida leyeity, kit integrity, 
and hi* great pmnal oontrlbution to tho Di vie ion throughout kU neny years' 
service art too mail known to need comment* 

Tho Division, a« reorganised in 1939, ooaelsts of tho Subdivision of 
Supervisory Servloe, tho Subdivision of Settlemente, Subdivision of Appeals, and 
tho Subdivision of Social Servloe to tho Tewkabury State hospital and Iufiraary* 
Reports of tho oo subdivisions aro ho ro with tubal t tad. 

In submitting tho report of tho Division, grateful acknowledgment it given 
to Miss Plor* I. Burton who serrtd as Acting Ohiof Supervisor of tho Subdivision 
of Supervisory Sorrioo for two years, returning to bar regular position of 
Supervisor of tho Subdivisiom of Social Sorrioo to tho Tewksbury State hospital 
and Infirmary in September, 1941, Mist Burton hat aided tremendously in establishing 
a Supervisory Sorrioo through tho seven District Of fleet in Springfield, So rooster, 
Lawrence, Bedford, Brookton, Sew Bedford, and Boston by her inspiring loader ship 
and her sound guidance through the numerous problems of establishing this nor; 
eerriee. 

Tho Division is glad to naleone albert B. Bowel 1 as tho permanent appointee 
from the Civil Sorrioo register* Be comes to as with on unusual background of 
experience and training which will be a valuable asset to the Dirlsi on* 

During the past year tho clothing committee completed its study of clothing 
otemdards and costs, the results provide a standard on which we eon rely with 
great confidence as a basis for reoomaended old and for stats reimbursement* 

further study Is sis* being given to standards of assistance to provide an 
accurate method of acmsurlng need with due regard to individual reguiromente and 
resources necessary for maintenance of health and well-being at nl alarm cost. 

During the year tho Manual of Una, Rules, Policies sad Procedures for the 
Administration of Publls Assistance, issued for the guidance of local Boards of 
Public Welfare, has Veen supplemented and brought up to date* Such Manual material 
aust be thus continually revised and supplemented if it is to remain correct end 
achieve its greatest usefulness* 

A i n— I t too of the stuff e Depleted s study of ease recording during the 
year and prepared * reoomnended outline for asm in this highly important task* 
These outlines have been nade available to local Boarde of Public Sol faro* 

The Social Security Board completed its fir st annual administrative review; 
and rendered its report to tho Department. This cerrice io an analysis of the 
itate-wlde operation of the Old Age Assistance and Aid to Dependent Children 
programs secure* through tho study by * special field staff of local and state 
records of actual oases aided or rejected, supplemented by careful examination 
of state end local procedures through which tfids ai* i» adalnlsterod* Such * 
service is important to the Social Security Board as assurance that the provisions 
of the state plsn am actually In effect* It is also an invaluable si d to the 
ttate and 1*0*1 departjsente in appraising the program and seeking th# highest 
practicable standards of administration. 



z - 



The Division hM alto had U use ft eftee-reviewj ooadueted by its own tm 
vial tor a whioh provides U graphio fm the strengths ud efeknesses in leeal 
handling of eases. The findings supplement and TtUdttt thoeo of tho federal 
administrative review. 

Tho results of thoeo review* show much air eady aoeowplished, aach yet to bo 
dm, both by saployees of thie Division and by local Boor do of Publlo Welfare. 
Subetantially It may bo oaid that proof of ollfibility la roapoot to age, residence, 
oitisenehip, ownerehip of property, roal and pereonal, It satisfactorily 
established. Fiscal control • aro also properly maintained. Throughout tho ftato 
thoro it evidence of constant impro v em e nt in thooo roapoato. 

Other findlage indieatoi 

1, Tho nood of safeguarding tho right to apply and tho right of appeal 
la OH Ago Assistance and Aid to Dependent Children. 

1. Tho nood for more thoughtful investigation both bo for a old it granted 
oad oa ft continuing basic. 

S. Tho necessity of bottor rooordo of each investigations oad relnvsetiga- 

tlomo. 

Ia view of tho state *s responaibility to tho Social Security Board to 
iaouro eon tinning grants for Aid to Do p and ant Child ron oad Old Ago Assistance, 
which now aaouat to approximately aoToatoon million par year, oad under tho 
amendmente to tho ototo lawa thio year, it la elmilarly erident that more toooiflo 
•toadordo an at bo adopted by tho Department la auperrieing tho odainiotratloa 
of thooo programs. 

Tho Dlrialoa haa now had tho ssrvises of the throe oonaultanta for o full 
year oad lo thua able to work out Bound atandarde la their reapeotlTo fieldO| 
tea la modi eel core, oad one la standards of assistance. Tho work la tho latter 
field laeluded not only olothing atandarda previously referred to, bat alao tho 
lioaoaoo occh sin aoatho of ourroat budget figures. Consultation oa individual 
oftooa pre tent tlffieult probloao hot been avail able oad speaking engageaents hare 
been f 11* d. 

Ia tho field of medloal sare the consult ant a have s soured the valuable 
ftoslstanoo of professional advisory oossalttooa. Including physleisas, dentists, 
hospital sdsdniatratore, druggiato, nurses, oad oedloal sooisl workers. Aa 
latordopartaeatal oouaoil of ototo departments interested la health sad welfare 
was si ao initiated. Coaoidoroblo progrooo haa fceea aado ia studying tho 
aonlfold probloao of aodlool aoro, ia relating oil available rooouroos to 
tho existing noeda sad asalating ia providing for all reasonable needs at 
a In 1 ana ooat. 

Ao tho year alossa tho Division faeee a number of probloao which will doaoad 
tho boot offorto of all ooaooraed to meet then aatiaf actorily. It it believed, 
however, that subetantlol progrooo lo being aodo toward tho end that all 
Individuals ia tho State who ilaofe the aoooooltloo of life may bo assured of 
ftsslstaaoo sufficient to relieve want sad that publlo funds will bo judiclouely 
used In carrying out this accepted responsibility of government. 



7 



Fred J. Rice, Supervisor 



The subdivision of settlements investigates the settlements of 
patients admitted to the Tewksbury State Hospital and Infirmary* 
State Farm (Infirmary Department), StateSanatoria, and the Massachusetts 
Hospital School, and generally supervises the settlement work of the 
division. There was one yerson remaining in the Infirmary Department 
of the State Farm on November 30, 1941. 

The facilities of the Infirmary Department are no longer available 
for the admission of dependent persons from cities and towns. 

The following table is a summary of the work done during the year 
in the examination and investigation of settlements of inmates of the 
State Institutions! 



Settle- No Orders Total 
Institutions Examina- Orders ments Settle- with- Case* 

tions Issued Found ment drawn Returned 



State Infirmary 


23a 


642 


531 


242 


152 


925 


State Farm 


13 


12 


2 


11 





13 


Lakeville State Sanatorium 


264 


208 


196 


14 





210 


Ho, Reading State Sanatorium 


111 


101 


98 


9 





107 


Rutland State Sanatorium 


216 


62 


66 


51 





117 


Westfield State Sanatorium 


176 


159 


166 


10 





176 


Massachusetts Hospital School 


$ 


8 


6 


2 





8 




3129 


1212 


1065 


339 


152 


1556 



Cases pending November 30, 1941 - 388 



'< en 



O 

w 
> 

CO 

cc 

CO 
»-3 



O 



* 



O 

> 

03 
I 



o 

VjJ 
O 



a 

CO 











V» 


00 






H 










> 






w 


o 


lo 


VjJ 


H 




£: 




CO 






1— 1 











o 
o 



n 
a 

H 

1 

I- 

O 



»-3 

-t1 



CO 



o 

C 

c 

CO 



co 

CO 

S 



o 
o 



5 a 

o 



VjJ 
vO 

O 
H 



CC 

o 
o 



o 
o 



3* 



»- 









v» 










« 








H 










U* 


-J 




O 




vO 


vO 


O 


» 


%. 


>» 


% 




H 


VjJ 


JO 


O 


o 


-J 

O 




O 

VjJ 


u» 

VjJ 




• 


• 


• 


• 


m 


VjJ 


o 


fO 


H 


o 


»-• 


CO 




O 


VjJ 



o 



s 



G 



o 
fi> 

& 



O 

s 

& 



o 



r 

a 

% 

O 

3 




00 




?o 












%■ 




% 








o 


H 


O 


VjJ 






VjJ 


VjJ 


NO 


H 




VJ» 


i— ' 




CO 






<• 


w 


V 








>o 


O 








o 


NO 


vO 




o 




f 


00 


-J 




CO 








• 


• 


• 


• 


CO 


H" 




O 








H 


o 


nO 


VJ> 















o 
© 



o 

Vjl 

•2 













H 


io 


CO 




fO 


M 


»-• 




«■ 


% 


<• 




VjJ 


nO 








-J 












• 


• 


• 


• 


jo 


VjJ 






O 


NO 









C3 


00 


(1 


00 


(2. 


% 


c 


VjJ 


o 










• 


O 


VjJ 




CO 





f 



o o 

c* O O 

1 tr tr 
p • i 

o ■ o 

*i «♦ i 

© « 

to » H 
H» 

P. • 

8 • 

O 



^3 



JO 



o 



SB 

K 
o 



1041 

SUPERVISION OP WAYFAKSRS LODOKS AND 
CHEAP LODGING HOUSES 



There is but one municipal lodging house in the 
Coxnr.onwealth known a* a Wayfarer* f Ledge, and this is raintalned 
by the City of Boston* 

It has a capacity for 174 sea* Ho women are lodged* 

In the charitable and commercial lodging houses, the 
conditions have satisfactorily been improved* 



AUTO JUL REPORT OF THK 8UB-DIVISI'J!i OF SOCIAL 8EBYICB 



Where do all the patients come frota end *hy do they cone are 
the questions no at frequently asked by visitors to Tewksbury. They are 
the Indigent sick without legal residence* they eoise froa nany faraway 
lands , but the aajority were born in this country, and nany have lived in 
Massachusetts for years* They are predominantly the unskilled workers who 
have earned small or irregular wages and never enough to save for illness* 
They are without family ties, usually unmarried, with no one responsible 
for their carej homeless and friendless when age or illness cores. 
Itinerant, in that without homes, they were free to travel to wherever 
there was work) a few have sons and daughters whose hoses ere unsuitable for 
thee, or their medical care too exacting for the hose* They have be*>n 
working on our farms, on the roads, in our subways, in our kitchens, res- 
taurants, hotels and laundries* They have done ths hard work for little pay. 
They have had little education, seldom beyond the sixth grade, because they 
case froa meagre hoses in this country or serosa the seas, where they ^ere 
obliged to go to work as children to increase the family income* They had 
no opportunities for high school or trade training which night have increased 
tr.eir economic status and ersonsl satisfaction; their physical strength 
frequently was sapped in thf ir adolescence; the energy and ambition, which 
co~es in early manhood, died almost before it was born. ShlXtles ?aess. whicj 
sone flight call it, cay ii&ve co.ue froa early physical inertia, rue to lack 
of proper food, r^at, recreation, and thwarted frustrated anbitions. 

Where do patients go froa here. Dpon the recommendation of the 
physicians, the social service workers arrange for the discharges of 
patif-ntd who go to work which may have been found for thea, to find their 
own work, or they may receive old age assistance or general relief, for 
which application has been nade. They aay go to relatives who have agreed 



to a ■ suae r«>3) o isiblllty at least temporarily, or to other institutions, 

mental hospital!, State or County sanatoria, to other hospitals for 
specialised treatment, and sometimes to the District Courts for probation 
or incarceration. Some abscond or leave against advice* 8any r era* in 
indefinitely because of terminal and chronic illness* 

On December 1, 1940, there were 2331 to the hospital wards and 423 
in the aental wards, a total of 2370, 325 less than last year* The sen, 1531 
as always f &r ou tnumbered the women patients, 304; the children under 15 
numbered 89 and those between 15-21 numbered 33* The monthly admissions 
in the winter of 1940-1941 cowering December to March, always the heaviest 
months, averaged 199, which shows a decrease compared with the same month* 
in previous years* The rise and fall of the admissions of men have always 
indicated employment conditions* The admission of men is 10 or snore to 
every one woman, but the men come for short periods of illness and recuper- 
ation, whereas women stay much longer due to chronic disease; in the con- 
stant population, exclusive of the insane and minors, there are 6 men to 
every one wo^an at this date. There were 1186 readmlsslons* 

The patients in the ental ward never increase, 65 sen and 358 
women, as there are no new commitments; a gradual decrease coses through 
death, 15 this year* Eventually it is planned that they wilj. be absorbed by 
by the State mental hospitals* 

CHROffIC SICK 

the buildings no* occupied by the insane coxild be improved for the 
adequate and extended care of the chronic sick for which there are very few 
resources in the State* The congestion of apartment house living and the 
cost of long time chronic illness has &ade impossible the care of the invalid 
in the home. To meet this need which eventually siust become a public social 
service, more than 600 co-snerci&i nursing and convalescent hones have 
sprung up througho * the iJtate, for which there ftavebeen no approved standard 



of care as yet established* The inspection for license for hoses boarding 

the aged persons over 65 years old, is an inspection which scf-ks only to 
prevent fire hazards and overcrowding, Tewksbury State Hospital is far more 
suitable than these nursing hoaes, with its good taedical service and pleaasnt 
wards, a service which Right be offered at $9.00 a week (the per capita cost) 
for those who can afford to p&y for care, and free to all who cannot pay 
regardless of legal settlement. 

tm 

The aale hospital for tsen is always crowded with the chronic sick, 
the acutely ill of the chronic sick, acutely ill of new admissions, con- 
valescence f res surgical operations, etc. With the extended use of the John 
H* lichois Building for the ambulatory sick, two wards in the Lien's pavilion 
have be*sn freed for convalescence, thus reducing the overcrowd in£ in the 
winter months. Soae beds, 15 to 20 per cent of the total beds, must always 
be kept vacant for the esiergency, acute illness and for the segregation 
and treatment of infectious diseases. The Bancroft Building has had on the 
average of 100-120 aen ill with tuberculosis, the great majority of thea 
fatally ill, but a few recover sufficiently to be discharged to the cos&unity. 

As the raen becoise able to return to the coasunity or they become 
eligible for old age assistance, the social workers find loggings or ^ork 
for soae, for others they arrange for application to the iocs! boards of 
public welfare for public assistance, i^ecuently the old age assistance 
application is taken in the Infirmary so that when the applicants are 
discharged their assistance payment is waiting for thea at the local Bureau 
of Old Age assistance. Many »ho are witiiout families and funds and too old 
to seek new jobs, will reaain for shelter until the a&gie day of 65 years 
arrives, when they are discharged, others rezsaln, preferring group living 
and sociability of the institution. It is regrettable that public assis- 
tance under General Relief is not sufficiently adequate to provide a decent 

if 



standard of care for those who are not citizens, a discrimination which 
should be corrected by law or adequate assistance made mandatory. When men 

with arrested tuberculosis are ready for discharge and arc homeless, the 
social worker arranges for part-time or suitable work frequently supplementing 
a small wage with public assistance* 

Total admissions 20L4* Total discharges 1939 (712 absconded). Deaths 290. 

Service to gen 

Social Service Casesi Intensive cases 512 

Short service cases 559 

Miscellaneous services to patients 3000 

in hospital wards 
Men receiving service in the community 458 

nan 

The women, excluding the maternity ward, are sick and need long 
time care, very few coae because of temporary or slight illnesses, ^osen 
more frequently retain family ties, or find shelter, than men, but as they 
grow sore feeble, they are likely to give up public assistance, needing sore 
sedie&l care than they can obtain in the coaaunity. The women's hospital 
is well filled but not overcrowded and the women* s house for the ambulatory 
sick is less than half full* 

Women with personality difficulties or physical deformities are 
frequently admitted because the family or the community can mo longer 
endure their eccentricities. Improved health end the services of the 
social worker stakes possible rehabilitation in a new environment. 

Syphilis and gonorrhea imo b^cn a low incidence among the younger 
wosen. Frequently, owever, an old infection resulting in eoupiete incapacity 
needs terminal care* 

The aaternity service, although there is no restriction, has becose 
largely one for the unmarried mother who avails herself of public Infirmary 
care as she is usually without funds and say be admitted early in ; regnancy. 
152 were admitted for confinement - 87 births and 41 waiting* The social 
situation both before and after confinement lengthens the time within the 

if 



institution into several months* 84 women came for mate ml ty care* 26 of 
whom were under 21 and of this number 17 wore wards of the Industrial 
School for Girls, The social service involved In the problem of the 

1 

unmarried mother extends over many months of careful investigation and 

planning for rehabilitation and then long time supervision until the mother 
has stabilised 1 erself and the child has been established either in the 
foster hoae or with the mother* The supervision and follow-up in the 
community is the test of the social plan and the understanding of the social 
worker* Soae girls and wowen continue to need service for years and it is 
generously and patiently given, and to some who will never b<? able to be 
self-sustaining; others soon find work or friends who give them needed 
protection and encouragement* 

Total admission of women 402* Total admission of minors 230* 
Total discharges 175* Deaths 76* 

Service to Women 
Women receiving social service at the State Infirmary 



IConthiy average for the year 265 

Persons in the community receiving social service 

lonthly average for the year 131 

Tisits to clients 1343 

Hew wage hones investigated and approved 47 

Replacements 116 

/isits of investigation 417 



CEIbDFElC 

The children, a sonthiy average of 158, are in the ..ospital xQT 
three reasons s 1* Kew born infants wh se aethers have been recently 
confined, are convalescent, receiving medical treatment, or awaiting a 
suitable rehabilitation in the community, will leave the institution as soon 
as their sothers are ready for discharge. They go with their aotners, if 
no relatives are available, and suitable work can be found for the mother 
with her baby, otherwise, they are placed in foster homes of the Division 
of Child Guardianship. 2* Certain children, 56 on December 1, 1941* with 
incurable disease, such as hydrocephalus 17, spina bifida 5$ and 



aalf oraations 39, which rake it impossible for the parents to ear* for 
such pitiful little ones In their own hones, remain until death releasee 
thorn* 

The demand for the care of this type of child has increased so 
rapidly that a waiting list for adaissions has been established as the 
wards set aside for these children hare been filled to capacity . 61 *erc 
adaitted this last year, 6 died and none were discharged* 

3. The children, 49 on December 1, 19-41, who are wards of the 
Division of Child Guardianship and unplaceable in foster horses because of 
their aent&i deficiencies, are awaiting transfer to the State schools for 
the feebleminded whenever thore are vacancies* 

tfith the many resources for nodical care and treatment and for 
the foster hose placement of children throughout the State, and because the 
hospital is so largely for adults and the chronic sick, it has been the 
policy to liait the admission of aentally normal children to tho fe* *ho 
need long tise care for chronic disease and for whos there is no other 
hospital available* 

Births 87. Adaissions 230* Discharges 192* Deaths 14* 

SOTERyTBIGH AKD PiJkCMEHT 
The supervision and after care of patients, when they return to 
cosaunity living continues to be an important function, fifedic&l follow-up 
with visit3 to the local hospitals and ^clinics aro necessary to complete the 
cedical recou endetion and treatment of nany discharged patients, The re- 
habilitation of Dersons tfith health or social handicaps presents aany 
probleas T?hich need assistance and advice* 

Persons given supervision and assistance 

in the coaisunity 
Men 458 
Somen 200 

50 Savings Accounts for clients amounting to I7869.26 
Money collected for sup ort of children bom 

out of wedlock $3098.12 
Suaber of bank accounts for children born 

out of wedlock ^ 79 



Money paid out for support of children 

born out of wedlock $4619*55 

Balance on hand for children born out of 

wedlock Nov. 30, 1941 19070.46 



TJUHSPGRTaTIC® 

Transportation application* received at office- - 87 

Transportation given 63 
Transportation secured elsewhere 10 
Transportation not accepted 8 

Bo settlement in alleged place of residence 6 



87 

Referred byi 

B« P. W. 19 

0. P. W. 17 

Frivate agencies 10 

Correctional agencies 6 

Travellers' aid Society 22 

Keif JJ. 



87 

STODmS IS TRAIHIRC 
Three students froa the Boston College fiohool of Social ^ork have 
had their field service in the Division* The two younr iaen were concerned 
vlth the problems of homeless aen at Tewksbury and the young woaan was 
particularly interested in the unauarried aother problem. 

The Sub-Division Irishes to express its appreciation to the Can- 
al s^ioner and Director for their Interest and cooperation In the social 
service cork tt Tewksbury Sttte Hospital. ^ The Supervisor, wiic has been 
serving only part— titse in the Division due to < ther services in the public 
assistance ^rogr^, wishes to express her appreciation to the staff rhich 
has carried on so loyally and so efficiently for two years, accepting the 
responsibility for the work which has seant overwork and auch overtime for 
each individual staff member. 



it 



ANNUAL REPORT from December 1, 1940 to November 30, 1941 

SUBDIVISION OF APPEALS 

Louis R. Lipp, Supervisor 

OLD AGE ASSISTANCE APPEALS 
Chap. USl f Acts of 1939 

The number of appeals pending December 1, 1940 332 
Appeals received from December 1, 1940 to November 30, 1%1 2455 



Total 2787 



Appeals acted upon: 



No action taken, aid granted by local bureaus 94 

Closed for various reasons 84 

Withdrawn 63 

Died _22 

Total 263 

Cases approved 651 

Cases denied 1482 

Total 2133 

Total appeals acted upon 2396 



Total appeals pending, November 30, 1941 391 



Cases investigated — 1492 
Hearings held — 1635 



Reasons for denial by Subdivision of Appeals frcm 12-1-40 to 11-30-41: 

Present allotment sufficient 457 

Children able to provide 415 

Sufficient resources 220 
Unsatisfactory explanation of 

expenditure of funds 56 

Transfer of property (real and personal) 53 

Lack of essentials h8 

Insurance taken out within past 5 years * 31 
Ownership of property upon which not residing 31 

Excessive personal property 28 

Excessive insurance 24 

Not in need 23 

Not deserving 20 

Husband able to provide 15 

Retroactive payments denied 11 

0AA taken under false pretenses 10 
More than 60 days since official action 

by local bureau 7 

Other reasons 3 , 3 

TOTAL APPEALS DENIED 1482 
12-1-40 to 11-30-41 



APPEALS RECEIVED BY DISTRICTS: 



District #1 



Adams 


10 


Amherst 


1 


Ashfield 


1 


Bernardston 


3 


Chester 


1 


Chic ope e 


24 


Clarksburg 


1 


Colrain 


1 


Conway 


2 


Deerfield 


2 


East Longmeadow 


5 


Easthampton 


1 


Erving 


2 


Gill 


1 


Goshen 


1 


Granby 


1 


Great Barrington 








Hampden 


1 


Hatfitld 


4 


Hinsdale 


T 
X 


Holyoke 


28 


Lee 


3 


Lenox 


1 


Leyden 


_1 



Total appeals 



District §2 



Acton 


7 


Athol 


3 


Ayer 


1 


Bolton 


1 


Charlton 


2 


Clinton 


5 


Fitchburg 


15 


Framingham 


3 


Gardner 


3 


Grafton 


4 


Hardwick 


1 


Hud son 


3 


Lancaster 


1 


Leicester 


3 


Leominster 


15 


Littleton 


3 


Lunenberg 


2 


Marlboro 


6 


Maynard 


1 


Milford 


9 


Miliary 


1 


Natick 


10 


North Brookfield 


2 


Northboro 


2 



Ludlow 7 

Monson 1 

Montague 3 

Monterey 1 

North Adams 8 

Northampton 22 

Orange 9 

Palmer 11 

Pittsffeld 36 

Sheffield 1 

Shelburne 2 

South Hadley 5 

Southampton 1 

Springfield 125 

Tyringham 1 

Wales 3 

Ware 1 

?/arwick 2 

West Springfield 19 

Westfield 6 

Westhampton 1 

Whately 2 

Williamsburg 1 

Williams town 4 

Wor thington 1 

received from District #1 391 



Northbridge 5 

Oxford 3 

Pepperell 2 

Petersham 1 

Rutland 3 

Shrewsbury 1 

Shirley 4 

Southborou^i 1 

Southbridge 11 

Spencer 8 

Sterling 3 

Stov 1 

Sutton 2 

Temple ton 2 

Warren 6 

Wayland 1 

Webster 2 

West Boylston 1 

West Brookfield 3 

We s thorough 1 

Westford 3 

Wincher.don 9 

Worcester 92 



Total appeals received from District #2 268 

5, 





3 




23 


Anu«¥*T 




T ■■ ill 


48 


ttsdfofd 






3 




U 


tOddl«ton 


2 


3iH«ie* 


ID 




1 




1 


KnfaMi yport 


22 




4 


Berth Antover 


2 


C •lAAf ^rd 


a 


Korih Ra ding 


4 




2 


raabo y 


6 


Or* cut 




B— rtlng 


U 


o j»g»t «n 


2 


SU»i«jr 


2 


01 ueaster 




Reexport 


3 




4 




2 


Kacsilt* 


4 




3 




HI 


w**t Mcwbury 


3 




Jk 




11 



Total appeals r*c«i* *t Xrou District #3 345 



?1 nrteft jk 





34 




7 


. 5*1 ■ © t 


2 


SteJSefcefS 


7 


6*«ol««a 


a 




1 


Uxi.* ion 


l 


taiwfield 


7 




68 


t Bitten 


52 




46 




7 




3 


i&eAleeley 


4 


:*Ji ,rd 


24 


HMfli 


4 




4 


*im:heft«r 


7 




>7 


tfinthrep 


26 


Revere 


28 




32 


**aleo 


XO 







Total a\>;*al* receive fraa DIb rici #4 434 



Dlitrlat #3 



AbinetoO 


28 


Mated? 


Attleboro 


18 


Hiddleborough 


Avon 


2 


Milton 


telling*** 


2 


Borth Attlabar ucb 


grain tree 


A 


Norfolk 


Jrid^eeater 




Sorton 


Brockton 


6J> 


Rorwell 


Canton 


2 


Norwood 


Dedhaj* 


6 


Plyinouth 


Duxbury 


2 


Quinojr 


£*at Bridgo*ater 


3 


Randolph 


aoaton 


3 


Baynhan 


Foxboro 


9 


Rockland 


Franklin 


1 


^cituata 


Halifax 


1 


Sharon 


Hanover 


2 


Stoughton 


Kaneon 


2 


Taunton 


Kinghara 


1 


s Ipole 


Holbrook 


1 


Weataood 


Kingston 


1 


ffoyj&outh 


iSaxahXiaid 


-5 


Jfhltaan 



Total appaala received froa District #5 



Acuehnet 


5 


New Bedford 


Barnstable 


4 


Oak aiu fo 


aoume 


1 


Provincetown 


Chatham 


2 


Eoeheater 


uart&outh 


20 


Sandwich 


Deraila 


1 


Seekonk 


Dighton 


3 


Somerset 


fair haven 


1 


i>w nsea 


KaU ftlvef 


64 


Tiebury 


Falmouth 


2 


W*reham 


Harwich 


1 


i eUfleet 


Lake villa 


1 


V.entport 


arion 


1 


Y rrouth 


.Nantucket 


2 





Tatal appeals received iron District s/6 

District O ' 

Boston 251 Everett 

Brooklina 23 So ervilla 

Ca/Aridge 101 

Total appaala received fron District #7 



ANNUAL REPORT from December 1, 1940 to November 30, 1941 



SUBDIVISION QF APPEALS 

Louis R. Lipp, Supervisor 

AID TO DEPENDENT CHILD; EN APPEALS 
Chapter 2^8, Acts of 1939 

The number appeals pending December 1, 19 AO 20 
Appeals received from December 1, 19 AO to November 30, 1941 162 

Total 182 



Appeals acted up out 

No action taken; aid granted by local boards 11 

Closed for various reasons 4 

withdrawn 12 

Approved 55 

Denied 68 



Total appeals acted upon ■ ■ ■ ■ -- 150 
Total appeals pending 11-30-41 — 32 



Appeals investigated — 87 
Hearings held — 111 



Reasons for denial by Subdivision of Appeals from 12-1-40 to 11-30-41 t 



Present allotment sufficient 23 

Sufficient income 18 

Do not meet qualifications of ADC law 10 

Excessive Insurance 3 

No evidence husband incapacitated 1 
Unsatisfactory explanation of 

expenditure of funds 2 

Received ADO under false pretenses 1 
Unable to carry out fully duties of 

"parent" 1 

Unfitness of home I 
Unsatisfactory living conditions * 1 
Ownership of property upon which appellant 

does not reside 1 

No desertion on part of husband 1 
Lack of statistical evidence of 1st marriage 1 

Hot in need 1 

Not living with children 1 

Not acting as parent 1 

Employed _1 

. TOTAL APPEALS DENIED 68 
12-1-40 to 11-30-41 



APPEALS H^Ci^XVKD BI DISTRICTS t 



District £i 

Adas* 2 Greenfield 2 

Aaherst 1 Holyoke 2 

Becket 1 Northampton 2 

Chicopee 4 Palmar 1 

fcesthkmpton 1 Pittsfield 4. 

Erving _1 Springfield 1 

leetfield _2 

Total appeals received from District #1 24 

District $2 

Boyle ton 1 Northborough 1 

Fitchburg 3 Oxford 1 

Hubbardston 1 West Boylston 1 

Lunenburg 1 Worcester 7 

Total appeals received from District #2 16 

District §1 

Gloucester 1 Newburyport 2 

Haverhill 1 Rockport 2 

Laurence 4 Srlea 2 

Lowell WiX-.'dngton 2 

Total appeals received freo District #3 Id 

District & 

Chelsea 3 Revere 4 

Concord 2 Stoneham 1 

Lexington 1 Svrajspscott 2 

Lynn 3 Waltham 3 

y.alden 7 V.'oburn 2 

Medford _1 

Total appeals received from District #4 29 

/ 

(continued on next page) 



District #5 








Abi. c ton 


2 


Plymouth 


2 


Attlaboro 


4 


Quincy 


1 


Avon 


1 


Rockland 


1 


Brockton 


4 


Scituute 


2 


Dedham 


1 


Sharon 


1 


Holbrook 


1 


3 tough ton 


1 


ml 1 1 


X 


>i68 tWOOQ 


JL 


Middleborough 


2 


Taunton 


2 


won ojuk 


2 


Teymouth 


A 


North Attleboro 


1 


Whitman 






Total appeals received from District #5 


33 


District #6 








Dartmouth 


5 


New Bedford 


3 


A All Mni AC 


2 


Oak Bluffs 


X 


Bams table 


2 


Provinoetovm 


2 


£>as unam 


1 


Swansea 




Hattapoisett 


JL 


Wareham 


A 




Total appeals received from District #6 


20 










Boston 


18 


Everett 


1 


Cambridge 


JL 


Somerville 


_2 




Total appeals received from District #7 


22 


District #1 


24 






#2 


16 







#3 18 

#4 29 

#5 33 

#6 20 

#7 22 

Total received - 162 



BUREAU OF RESEARCH AND STATISTICS 



The Bureau of Research and Statistics completed its fifth year 
at the end of 1941. The functions of the unit include collecting, 
compiling, analysing and publishing statistics of the principle 
types of Belief which may be enumerated as follows: 

1. Statistics of assistance and aid administered under 
the provisions of Titles I and IV of the Social 
Security Act: Title I — Grants to States for Oid 
Age Assistance, and Title IV — Grants to States for 
Aid to Dependent Children. These Titles require that 
the State agency administering Old Age Assistance and 
Aid to Dependent Children shall sake reports in such 
form and containing information as the Social Secur- 
ity Board may from time to time require, and shall 
Comply with such provisions as said board may find 
necessary to assure the correctness and verification 
of the reports, 

2. Statistics of General Relief administered under the 
laws of the Commonwealth and the regulations of the 
Department of Public Welfare. This info rraation is 
submitted by every city and town in the Commonweal th 
each month on prescribed lorms and is combined by 
the Bureau into county and state totals. 

3. Statistics of Soldiers* Relief granted under the laws 
of the Commonwealth and the regulations of the Depart- 
ment of State Aid and Pensions. Through the courtesy of the 



it 



Department of State Aid and Pensions, the Bureau was 
given the opportunity to collect data on the number 
of cases, the number of persons represented, and the 
amount expended monthly by each city and town. 

4,. Statistics oi' other types of aid and assistance admin- 
istered by other state and federal agencies in further- 
ance of the policy to develop the Bureau as a clearing 
house for all kinds of statistical Information relative 
to the entire Social Security program* Therefore, the 
Bureau has maintained tabulations of data secured from 
the following local agencies! — Department of Education, 
Division oi the Blind; ?eder«^l Cid Age Insurance; Unem- 
ployment Compensation Commission; and the Surplus Cothx>- 
dities Division of the Department of Public Welfare. 

5. Statistics with respect to Batters closely associated 
with relief* Tabulations are maintained by the Kureau 
on employment data caapiled and published by the Depart- 
ment of Labor and Industries; the Index of Industrial 
Activity in Massachusetts compiled by the State Planning 
Boerd; the Cost of Living Index published by the Depart- 
ment of Labor and Industries, Coar«ission on the liecesiaries 
of Life; other miscellaneous statistical information t?hich 
may be used in describing or analyzing the Relief situation. 
To all these cooperating agencies we here extend our acknow- 
ledgment for the permission granted us to republish their 
figures. 

6* Statistics relative to the social phases of the various 
types of relief administered by the department, collected 



on prescribed Social Data Cards. 

The staff of the Bureau includes several different Civil 
Service Classifications. The two most nunerous ers 
Social Workers (field representatives; and the Senior 
Statistical Clerks. The Social Worker j, each of whoa 
represents the Bureau in an assigned area oi the state, 
advise and assist the locri boards and officials relative 
to jaalntaininfc' welfare records, compiling regular or 
special reports and filling out Social Data Cards. 
The Bureau i3 organized so tiiat the compiling and tabulating work 
is apportioned by type of relief among several groups into which 
the staff is divided. Definite assi^n-nent of duties is rsade to each 
group which consists of the necessary nuater of workers required 
to perform the assignments and having the requisite cualif icationa. 

In addition, to complete files of the various types of relief 
statistics for each city &nd town, the Bureau maintains up-to-date 
records for the several Gcuntj.es arid for the Coia::onweaj.th as a 
whole. Data are published currently in a variety of fortes; for 
example, for the individual cities and towns and in summaries. 

In addition to the regular ; triodic reports submitted by the 
Bureau to Washington and used by 'Ihe Department, there are frequent 
calls for special reports or tabulations which usually describe sone 
particular phase of the relief situation in more detail than can be 
obtained from the regularly published reports of the Bureau, The 
growing number of such requests indicates not only the growing in- 
terest in the welfare problea from a statistical viewpoint, but, in 
a aeasure, evaluates the work of the Bureau as a public agency. 



Such organizations as chambers of commerce, taxpayers' associations, 
private welfare units and universities frequently ask for data 
which the Bureau has available and such requests are always welcome. 

The collection of figures on local Aid to Dependent Children 
administrative expenses during the year as a regular reporting pro- 
cedure :or which the Bureau riade up reporting :orms and Instructions 
for use of the local boards. This Information is collected regularly 
each quarter so that reimbursement to the state, cities and towns 
from Scleral funds for a.D.C. administration expenses will be f orthcoming. 

In conclusion j it aay not be aais^ to repeat what was expressed 
in the previous years* reports, as the Vrork of the Bureau progresses 
it is antici Dated that it will improve in quality, where the possibility 
of improvement exist3, and that its scope sill be progressively wider. 
It is planned &s ti:uo goes on to give Increased attention to the 
research phase of the work in which there are almost unlimited possi- 
bilities. Efficient and effective services to the Commissioner and 
the other policy making officials of the department, to the cities and 
towns aitd to all State agencies, public or private, are among our aain 
objectives. The interchange of information araon- the various agencies 
concerned with the Social Security program has been and will continue to 
be encouraged by the bureau. 

Finally *.e isisu to thank ail the many eooror&ting individual* 
and agencies for taeir assistance during the year with the assurance 
that any facts or figures in our possession ere always available to 
them. 



AID TO DEPENDENT CHILDREN - 19A1 



19*1 FAMILIES CHILDREN AMOUNT EXPENDED MONTHLY AVERAGE 

PER PER 
FAMILY CHILD 



T k *TT7 A OV 

JANUARY 


12617 


31271 


f 742,711 


1 58.87 


$23.75 




12756 


315o5 


rirn Aon 

/ 50 #0*0 


58.80 


23.76 


MJLKOn 


±do J4 


OlZ lit 


752,34© 


58.76 


23 .77 


ArnlJu 






743,l02 


5 / .94 


OO / T 

*3.4' 


MAY 


12796 


31594 


721,347 


56.37 


22.83 


tttuw 
J UXi£ 








rr / 
55.94 




JULY 


12582 


30928 


700,653 


55.69 


22.65 


AUGUST 


12*39 


30579 


692,929 


55.71 


22.66 


SEPTEMBER 


12484 


30668 


692,748 


55.49 


22.59 


OCTOBER 


12359 


30341 


713,042 


57.69 


23.50 


NOVEMBER 


12313 


30279 


691,590 


56.17 


22.84 


DECEMBER 


12357 


30321 


723.417 


58.54 


23.86 


TOTAL 






8,633,947 (b) 


57.17 


23.20 


AVERAGE 


12,585 (a) 


31010 (a) 









(a) Average monthly case load 

(b) Total yearly expenditure 



OLD AGE ASSISTANCE - 1941 



1941 NUMBER OF CASES AMOUNT EXPENDED MONTHLY AVERAGE 

PER RECIPIENT 



JANUARY 


86 


Q82 


2 


511 


161 


28 87 


FEBRUARY 




820 


2 


527 


873 


29.12 


MARCH 


87 


1 Al 


2 


537 


Q51 


2Q 12 


APRIL 


87 


174 


2 


530 


587 


29.03 


MAY 


87 


218 


2 


521 


074 


28.91 


JUNE 


87 


067 


2 


516 


044 


28.90 


JULY 


87 


0A6 


2 


514 


381 


28.89 


AUGUST 


87 


212 


2 


519 


966 


28.89 


SEPTEMBER 


87 


240 


2 


525 


841 


28.95 


OCTOBER 


87 


440 


2 


565 


293 


29.34 


NOVEMBER 


87 


536 


2 


555 


575 


29.19 


DECEMBER 


87 


825 


2 


6G7 


137 


29.69 




87 


225 (a) 


30 


432 


883 (10 


29.07 



(a) Average Monthly Case Load 

(b) Total Yearly Expenditure 



i 



► 

m 

• 

SS IO 
O -fr- 
et- 

CD O 

M \Jt 

VJt 



o 


as 


o 


DO 




u 


u 


K 




K 






H 


H 


H 


H 




to 


H 


to 


to 


\j» 


VjJ 




00 


-J 


00 


00 


o 


o 


vD 


v* 




to 


VjJ 


ON 


u» 


VjJ 


o 




o 


4»- 


H 


-J 


to 


h* 


VJt 


H 


IO 


H 


H 




-3 


u> 


to 


o 


O 


00 


VjJ 




sO 


00 






vO 


to 


00 


-J 


4>- 


H 




to 



H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


O 


*3 


ON 


^3 


ON 


O 


O 


vO 


H 


>o 


O 


to 


to 


O 




-J 




-»3 


00 


vO 



H 
ON 

CO 
VjJ 



H 

-J 

s 

4^ 



H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


vji 


vji 


©n 


0^ 




to 


>o 


o 


U> 


VJi 




VjJ 




to 


ON 




H 


-a 




H 



4^ 


OJ 


V*> 








VjJ 


VjJ 




4»- 


fe 


4>- 


VJI 


O 


Oi 




vn 


VJi 




•>3 


o 




VJl 




sO 


to 


o 


kjJ 


to 


»-• 


VJI 


CO 


tO 




o 


H 


to 


00 


-*3 


on 


Ol 




to 


O 


to 


O 


VjJ 


to 


VjJ 


to 


VJt 


VJi 


to 


to 


VJt 


-«3 


V* 


o 


O 


to 


H 


VJi 


00 


00 


v*> 


H 


























to 


H 














H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


o 


o 


00 


o 


00 


00 


vO 


00 


O 


H 


to 


to 


4»- 


to 


uJ 




w 


-3 


vO 


O 


o 


O 


00 






VJt 


VJt 


CO 


00 




-3 


o 


vO 


00 


00 


H 


a* 


to 


ON 


V*) 


o 


o 


vO 


00 




to 


00 


VJi 


0*> 


to 


00 


vO 


to 


H 


o 


00 


ON 


v* 


CO 


o 


o 


-3 


o 


to 


t 


js 


00 


4>- 


v*> 


-3 


to 


4^ 


H 


00 


ON 


-3 


ON 





SI 

<D O 

u 

© ct- 



s 



6 



tr 
H 



S3 

1 

H 

SO 

H 



M 

r <1 



VjJ 




VjJ 


VjJ 


VjJ 


to 


to 


to 


to 


VjJ 


VjJ 


to 


VjJ 


o 


o 


»-» 


to 


o 


00 


CO 


vO 


00 


O 


o 


vO 


H 


VJI 


ON 


O 


VJt 




-3 


VJt 




to 


O 


VJt 


VJI 


O 


VJI 


u> 


00 


~3 


O 


to 


O 




-3 


00 


00 


H 


-3 



a 

<t 

< 

to ^ 

a fo 
t— a 



H 


to 


H 


to 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 


H 




vD 


»- 


vO 


O 


00 


00 


vO 


-3 


00 


vO 




00 


o 


to 


Ot 




4^ 


VJI 


-0 




O 


VJI 


O 


4^ 


VJt 


o 




u> 


00 


s 


o 


to 


to 


vO 


to 


to 


VJt 


00 





d 
o 

»i > 

U (0 

OQ 
»i (D 
(D 
U 
• 



to 


to 


to 


to 




to 




to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


to 


p 




VJ» 






on 


4^ 


VjJ 


4^ 


ON 


ON 


VJt 


-J 




> 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


• 


>-i 


< 


00 




VjJ 


ON 




H 


4*- 


ON 


ON 


H 


00 




ON 






•*3 


o 


VJt 


«»3 


VjJ 


00 


o 


VJi 


VJt 


00 


CO 




to 


o 
to 


ra 



1041 

Boarding 9bmm for aged Person* 

m Frank tteDonald, Sup* 



In liittohuMtU today in 164 cities and torn there ere 
operating 736 licensee: nowee Tor ths Aged* During ths year 1£<1, 136 
new applications aero received, 160 licenses granted, 230 licensee 
renewed and 56 licenses cancelled* 

The law providing for the licensing of these besa&s wee enacted 
In 1029 when evidence wee Shown the Department of Public velf are that 
abuses gainst the interests and woll-beln£ of the lam tea of theae 
hoees waa being practiced* 2he law provides that w&oever mintaina a 
hoe* In wiileb three or xaare persona over the age of sixty years and 
net stt&ere of his laoedtete fatally are provided with care shall be 
deseed to maintain a hose for seed persons, and the Department of 
Public elf are is delegated to issue licensee and to make, alter, and 
attend the rules and regulations for tLe ^cvertssent of sueh hoees* 
rose licensee are issued for a tern of two years and ray be revoked 
at a?sr tine by the Departeent for oauae, and carrlee e penalty of '500* 
for the first offense and two 5^eare in Jail for the second offense for 
failure to license* It further provides that air/ parson proposing, to 
enter into a contract to provide care incident to advanced age, for life 
or for core then five veers, for any person over sixty Tears of e^s and 
not a xaoxsber of his family shall report this fact ixasediatelr to the 
roperV'ont and Shall, before entering into or receives sny consider* 
etion order such contract, deposit with the state Treasurer a bond in 
a sue and in amount se&lsf&etory to ti*e Dopartocnt, as security for the 
prorer care of the aged persons* 

One of t2te iaost extraorCi nary development* of recent jeers has 
Vssn the tnsfcroor growth of this new enterprise, board! n^ hc&ea for 
a^ed persons* She prc&ler of regulating these hc&es lias incre&stn&ly 
occupied our attention to the exx i: at in 1340 we revised the rules 
end regulations* 

7ho law governing these hordes specifically refers to these as 
Hoses for ^ed Persons* To eliminate confusion the lepertaent has 
now for tie purpose of these regulations determined that 

1* a convalescent heee cr hospital, rest bene, hose for the 
e^ed, nursing, fcore or ot!er institution of stellar da&racter, ro^arCloas 
of designation, cartr^ for three or rore percent eve,' the ae« of sixty 
and not incorporated under the law of/ Incorporated Chert ties shall bs 
deered. a Boarding IZoce for Aged Persons* 

5* So person suffering f rcas a contagious disease shall bo 

admitted* 

3* «o boarding here shall provido prenatal care or 4Kl-.it 
mtemlty cases* {Chapter III, sections 71-73*) 

4* Se boardinc house stall acU-.it or oars for persons who are 
suffering f*ec insanity, epilepsy, abnorml taental conditions, or those 
who are addicted to the intettperele use of narcotics or stimulants so as 
to have lost the power of self-control* 

Tor tie purposes of this regulation there is included in this 
restriction any person who is under p/rirrttssnt for any of the above 
conditions in any Institutions under the Jurisdiction of tho Ifcesacbu- 
setts repertraont of rental Health* 33 



ft* Boneo oaring for convalescents and the ohronlo si ok 
ahull cake provision for necessary nodical care by a a ad ieal doctor 
registered under the General lava of fcnasachnsetts* (Chapter 112, 
sections S-lftu) 

6* Haass oaring for convalescents and the ohronlc sick shall 
have the resident eupervleion of a nurse registered under the General 
Laae of kassachueetts* (Chapter 112, sections 74~C1*) 

7* So boarding house ahall keep within ite confines opluc, 
Lorphine, cocaine, heroin, codeine or other haM Worthing druc* aa 
defined in Chapter 94, section 197 of the General laws, or a hypedernic 
needle or syringe or other instrument adapted for the use of narcotic 
drugs by subcutaneous Injection, excepting t&at a registered nurse iaay 
keep in her possession a hypcdomic syringe or needle and may hare in 
her possession and administer said drugs only under the specific 
direction of a physician as provided for In Chapter 94, sections 197 
and £11* accurate record rsuet be kept of all such treatments* 

8« All poisonous substances »pst be plainly labelled end 
kept In a looted closet or cabinet* 

9« Patients shall occupy sleeping roosjs on the second floor 
of sny building only when two separate exits consisting of separate 
etairways, front and rear, are provided, A single interior stairway 
aay be supplemented with exterior stationary fire exit* 

K>« Patients nay occupy sleeping rooms above the second floor 
only in buildings of f irsfc*clasa fireproof construction* 

11* All roczss sust be outside roorcs with a Kintean of GOO cubic 
feet of air space allowed for each person* Dormitories shall be limited 
to six <6) beds* 

1&» All bads used for patients shall be at least 36 inches in 
width, six fast in length, and so spaced to permit freedom of ncverant 
on three sides* 

13* Patients* quarters shall not be looted, hooted or 
fastened in any warmer* 

14* Adequate tollot facilities suit be available on each 
floor where five or Bsore patients are being domiciled* 

15, Instructions governing/ ezsergenoy exit in ease of fire 
rust be posted in each roes** 

16* Dietary schedules rust be raintalned and a record of 
such accurately kept for inspection by the Department* 

17* A register approved by the £©pert»ent, showing the 
record of each patient suet be taaintained* 

13. AH hones operated under a license granted by this 
Department shall be so conducted as not to becooe a nuisance to, or 
an annoyance in, the coraajnity where located* 

the Department has now classified the licensed 3cord*nc SOnes 
for Accd Persons into two classes, A and 3* 

The Class A hams is a boras where the facilities c# a registered 



nuree or a graduate of an accredited school of nursing are obtained* This 
type of hos* ehall be Qualified to care for persons who need expert care 
as determined on the advice of a physician or hospital* 

Iho Class 8 boat la a haras where the facilities of a practical 
none who ha* had iom eaperienoo In oaring for tha aged aro obtained* 
Shit type of hone shall be Qualified to care for persons alio aro 
afflicted with 111a Incident to old age* or those without fardly 
aeoosraodatlona and needing some kind of custodial care, 

A list showing the classification is sent to all our district 
offices for distribution to bureaus In their area* to hospitals and 
to private agencies for their use* 

Our law provides tltat any suitable parson say Maintain a hoes* 
but the Department of Public Welfare say proscribe the conditions 
under fchleh a license shall be granted* The applicant saust haws the 
approval of trie chairaen of the local board of public welfare and 
the rocoec^snda t ions of throe physicians, who subscribe to five standard 
Inquiries pertinent to the applicant* On the acceptance of this applica- 
tion the building inspector of the ooKruaxity is requested to visit the 
proposed promises and to determine whether they roost the local building 
requirements* Alteration or additions ordered by hlis start be aecoapllslied* 
a visit is then cade tor **** lopartsent ' a Inspector stso uotenr lne* the quote 
adequate toilet facilities, the erection of partitions* elimination of 
fire health hasards* then this is eofsploted, the license Is approved 
for tha signature of the Coasnlss Loner* 

In the supervision of these hones the inspection fon la 
comprehensive, going Into ev er y phase of the problem to guarantee tho 
coaf ort, and care of the old people* Fe asset be alert when a nceae Is 
found not paying Its bills as it Is In those hams that violations mostly 
occur* 

Again it is the saalousness of those mk ns the Inspection tTiat 
will maintain a high standard of hesses* In this connection wo receive 
the co-operation of the local visitors who consistently go Into these 
hozsea and report any violation to the Dopartoont* 

It Is custccaary to warn the proprietor when a violation Is occurr- 
ing, and when no heed Is taken, then ws resncve the license* *2 © causes 
saves rally aro for overcrowding. Insufficient and poor food, Intoxicants, 
and ill-treateent of patients* Vie anticipate and do re calve strong 
opposition when s license Is removed* Political Influence is custouary, 
b t this pressure is favorably t^ot by Showing that It is an involvaisent 
of huoan misery, and it does not, in consequence, become a detcrmnt In 
our action* In 1941 eight licensee were resaoved and sixteen placed on 
probation* 

In construction the boarding bosses are ai-asin^ly alike* She 
horee aro usually in houses built during the days whan roes*) were large 
and house plane were ras&lins* They are ideal for this work, particularly 
large estates that have boon abandoned or have bean foreclosed* She 
trouble with these latter Is t: sat too often they are, as would be oz~ 
pec ted. In sonod areas* Iho Department quite often uses its influence 
with appeal boards In asking for the grant of a variance, wit- good success* 

It is with the bosses that sake a specialty ef accepting oCL ac* 
assistance and dependent aid cases , and aro paid a rdninuci of t30*OQ a month 
In our State for board, that require constant supervision* The bases that 
feature private patients generally are splendidly and satisfactorily operate: 



In the cheaper priced hoses the tendency la to overcrowd, 
seise? en food. end practice other •concede* that have our disapproval* 
It It very difficult at tloes to catch violations, and the Inspector 
has to rely en his observations, became it is nearly impossible to 
get a recipient to disclose that he is dissatisfied for fear of 
possible reprisals in the hows* A successful BSthod to obtain reliable 
evidence, alien our suspicions are aroused, is to seise their register 
and contact the relatives of the patients* Invariably they will con* 
flrr our suspicions upon the prcsdse of keeping the ratter confidential* 

8e do not restrict the nueher of hoses in any area when the 

applicant is acceptable, as we ere of the opinion that competition 
betters conditions* 2hla would sees so, because in a srmll town in 
the central part of the State there ie in it but one licensed hesae, 
end it was receiving f 17*50 per week for each 0*a«a* recipient, one of 
the highest grants In the Stats* fhe conditions In this hone were such 
that we were obliged to cancel the license for overcrowding, insufficient 
and unsatisfactory food- and uncloanllneaa. Profit is naturally the 
rot 1 vat ion in the operation of these hessee, and competition to a large 
extent obliges the operator to ^ive the bast cars possible or suffer the 
loss of patients* 

we believe that in classifying the hosts* a forward step has 
been te*ken» The Uepert£*nt is very careful in designating a a* A 
hose- 25- aso are the hesses that sasst have proven expert personnel to 
care for the real sick and terrinsl cases* Heretofore it has been the 
practice as an expedlancy to direct a patient to a bono where very 
often there wee but a practical nurse or one without any nursing 
kncvlau^e at all* We have had nure^ous instances where these persons 
took on the fcerb of a registered or graduate nurse, with fake insignia 
pine* and attempted to oars for side persons* a. dangerous practice ems 
existing and with over TOO of these howes In the Corasontwealth, and still 
increasing, we were obliged in the I nter e s t of the public good to sake 
this new regulation* 

2» licensed hones for aged persons fill a need in our State 
es prtxloailn&ntly the iasatee are 0*A*A* end L*k+ recipients* A roll eaU 
of these would surely disclose a great nany who at one tire were promin- 
ent in civic and business affaire of their eosssat ity* they, perhape 
through no fault of their own, are now obliged to be aided by a r?unif icent 
government, and it becomes paranount with us to see that they are suppor- 
ted and cared for as nearly ae possible to conditions that they have 
been accue tossed to* This we feel is bcin^ steadily accomplished* 



CIVILIAN CONSERVATION C0RP8 



The fifth of April, 1941, marked the eighth anniversary of 
the Civilian Conservation Corps, which is administered by 
the War Department, with the Office of Education and the Depart- 
ment of the Interior participating in the educational program. 

The program has been constantly expanded and improved over this 
eight-year period. During the past year the number of enrollment 
periods has been Increased to eight, and enrollees are now 
accepted in January, February, .April, May, Jaly, August, 
October, and November, Vocational education is available after 
work hours to any enrollee who is interested to attend classes. 

The selection of men for the Corps is handled by State Directors 
of Selection, appointed and authorized by the Director of the 
Corps, with the approval of the Governors of the various states. 
Application Is made through local welfare agencies. There are 
only three requirements for enrollment in the Civilian Conserva- 
tion Corps: The applicant must be a United States citizen between 
the ages of seventeen and ttoenty-thres and a half for junior 
camps (no age limits for veterans) and he must be out of employment 
and in need. 

The young men are enrolled, equipped, and assigned to camps by 
the War Department. Each enrollee is given a thorough physical 
examination, is vaccinated against smallpox and Is inoculated 
against typhoid fever. He receives full maintenance, including 
clothing, medical and dental care. In addition, he receives a 
wage of thirty dollars a month; eight (18.00) dollars of which is 
paid to hia in cash, seven (17.00) dollars is Placed on deposit 
for hia and is paid to him upon his discharge; and the balance 
of fifteen (|15«00) dollars is paid to his dependents if he has 
any; otherwise the amount is added to his bank deposit. New rules 
require daily calisthenics for the Junior enrollees, and attendant 
at first aid courses for every enrollee. 

The specific objectives set forth in the training program of the 
Civilian Conservation Corps are *he building of strong, healthy 
bodies; the training of nen to live, work, and play together; the 
teaching of good work habits; the training of men in specific 
National defense skills to open the way to employment; and the 
inculcation in all enrollees of an understanding and appreciation 
of our form of government. 

Each year, the Corps has taught more than 10,000 illiterate en- 
rollees to read and write; approximately 5,000 more have completed 
grade schools and received certificates; while 1,000 have earned 
High School diplomas, and about 100 men have graduated from colleg 

By agreement with the Maritime Commission, Civilian Conservation 
Corps enrollees are now permitted to enlist in the Merchant Marine 
if they possess the necessary qualifications. Those accepted for 

37 



! 



enlistment are eligible for Haval service in the event that they 
are called for military duty. The first group of Civilian 
Conservation Corps enrollees was inducted into the Maritime Service 
in October, 1939> and other groups have enlisted as facilities 
for them have become available at the various training stations. 
All graduates have been placed in positions and have made excellent 
records, A later ruling from the Bureau of iiaritime Inspection 
has declared these graduates eligible to take examinations for able 
seamen or for engineering positions. 

The value of the Corps to the nation in developing the physical 
fitness of the two and a half million young nen who have received 
its training is made more significant by the fact that one out of 
every nine men who registered for selective service had had this 
experience and was physically prepared to aid in the defense oi his 
country. Selective Service Board Examiners have stated that men 
with Civilian Conservation Corps training are from three to six month 
in advance of other civilians in their adjustments to Army life. 
It is safe to say that except for Army and Navy, the Civilian Con- 
servation Corps has made the largest over-ail contribution of any 
agency to the defense of the nation through its' training of men and 
its building up of our natural resources. The function of the Corps 
at this time is to continue its work in the conservation of our 
national resources, our forests, soil, our recreational areas, and 
to intensify its training program to prepare its members for mil- 
itary service or for placement in defense industries. 

The real test of the training program of the Civilian Conservation 
Corps is in the number of men placed in employment. Due to improved 
economic conditions and to more effective training in the Corps, the 
number of enrollees who have been discharged from the camps to 
accept employment increased from an average of 2,5QC per ~o::th in 
the fiscal year 1939 to more than 5>000 per :_onth in the fiscal 
year 1941. This does not include 253,819 enrollees who were dis- 
charged from the Corps during the last fiscal year at the expiration 
of their terms, a large majority of whom have since secured employ- 
ment . 



if 



AHBCAL REPORT 

COMMODITY DZSTRZBUTXOM DIVISION 
. 1941 - 

IBtBODUCTIOl 

Commodity Distribution la MasBachu; etts wee continued during 1941 eft the mm 
basis as previously r sport ad in tha years IBM to 1940* 

Publio Ho* 166, T6th Congress, approved /use 28, 1937, continued the existence 
of the Federal Surplus Commodities Corporation as aa agency of the united States, 
under the direction ef the Secretary ef Agriculture* This Act recognised the Federal 
Surplus Commodities Corporation as an instrumentality ef the Secretary of Agriculture 
for the carrying out the provisions ef Clause I, ef Section St ef the Act approved 
August 24th 1936, as amended, which provided for the encouragement of domestic con- 
sumption ef agricultural commodities and products thereof by diversion from the 
morsel channels ef trade and commerce* 

The Federal Surplus Commodities Corporation and its functions as an agency of 
the Department ef Agriculture mere administratively affiliated with the Surplus 
marketing Administration after My 1, 1941. 

The Federal agency operated as a complete operating and administrative emit in 
procuring surplus commodities, arranging for their allocation and transportation to 
the States, usually on a earlot basis er for their processing when necessary* Allooa- 
tioa ef Commodities cms based principally upon the number of certified eligible relief 
eases 1a each State, the amount of merchandise available to the Federal government 
for allocation, and the inventory eft hand in each particular State* 

81nce one ef the purposes ef Commodity Distribution was to increase consumption 
ef these products, certain specific commodities more often allocated in areas in which 
they were mot ordinarily used to a great extent, and in that way persons became famil- 
iar with their use and in many instances a future market was developed through this 



3? 



procedure • 

Regulations required that a commodity purchased la MM surplus area ma not to 
be distributed U another amotion where the im commodity was grown en a ooamorelol 

All donation! to th« atatea ware aada with tha atlpulatiam that tha goods ia 
dona tad should neither re-enter commercial channels nor compete with that portioa of 
tha supply which rami nod ia tha normal flow of trade, and that tha sonnsdltlss should 
ha given to indiri duals in addition to, rathor than la substitution for, any athor 
assistanoa awai labia from Moral State ar other source ■• 

This particular program of the federal agency sought to encourage tha use of 
surplus farm eovaoditlea which night otherwise have ham wasted, by distributiag then 
far use by nillions of fanllies who la eked tha means ta purchase these goods ia needed 
quantities, if at all* Conned it y Distribution was the nediua through which thousands 
af families became familiar with foods which they had never need before* 

Along with tha immediate benefits ta under-nourished preens and tha ground-work 
far future purchasing habits, the purchasing programs improved returns far tha Indivi- 
dual grower selling his products direct to the Government, and assisted in improving 
general marketing conditions and increased returns aa tha entire orep* 

These commodities were moved directly from the points of purchase ta State 
welfare agencies and used immediately by relief families, school lunch programs. 
Institutions and eligible speoialised activities. 

Ia 1940 and 1941 the P.S*C.C* approached the surplus problem ia a different 
annner that af moving goodls through the normal eh- nnels af trade* This was known 
as the Food Stamp Plan* It ma placed in operation on an experimental basis la a 
limited number af areas and later greatly expanded* 

Under the *ood 8 tamp Plan, which was voluntary, relief families would usually 
pur chase a minimum af orange colored stamps at the rata af approximately #1*00 per 
week for eaeh member of the family, or a nasi nam of $1*60* Blue ctampe ta tha value 



of to eon to, to to ussd by the eureheoer fur eerteia foods dost sauted as surplus 

by tKa Cnited ttetes PspartotsBt of A^rl vulture, aero ftlvM free to tit* fondly for 
eeeh 11*00 ewrtk of orange ttewns aureheeed* 

Oroajp oolorod itaope eeuld bo ueed for say food usually paro ha eod la trcoery 
stores, mud etb#r • pee If leal ly ooatioeod It eon* Hoseaptlsa for used •tease ooo wool- 
ly ends to the trace by eholeenlsrs and taunt, «oo U tura ooro reimbursed by too 
fodorol coveranenb* SteAps to U used for the pwrtfcoee of eettsa sate ri alt vera sloe 
oood to o United oroo of IfcssecUu ebbs. 

«hsn the rood Stoop operations so^anocd in o r.i^iO oroo, direct food dlttri- 
button with too onsoptlsa of a 11 teat teat to aeh el loot* profrant, iattlt tioat and 
opooUl prejcreea, wu di trout I sued* All clothing ep*ra*ieas continued on e direct 
dUtrUwilon basis* 

ty o«roooont with too f.S*G*C. tbe ttoto Pepart<»nt of Public * elf* re bod 
aponetred Genoa* Uy DUtrL otlnm la Ifccsuehu&sbts sine* Pcnrsober 1WS* There ens, 
hoeew, no apeeific lenlalntlea on too boobo authorising too Deoerb=r»3t to oot U 
this eeeecity esxept tho brood ooooro^o contained la Oo;*t«r It of too Oonorol Laws* 

It ooo therefore, deolnVd to Introduce specific lobulation authorising too 
Do portent of Public Welfare to Sponsor Coswaec L y DUtributlea* A nocture ooo droftod 
oad sutsuttsd bo tho legislature for •oaoldoratioa oad ooo uefeeeeuently passed oad lo 
lit tod oo Choptor *M of tho Acts of 1941. (tee copy of la&lslatlsa otboohod) 

cftdu-iTf S8SB3BS3 

Direct Distribution* Tho first stop oft 7 fit* to It vol la tho procure eat of tur- 
pluo foods for distribution book tho fora of oo ©f or trim tho P.S.C.C., statins: that 
o spool flsd asobor of oorloodo of o oorbola ltoo ooro ovollablo bo the State • All 
oooossory infer *tion oa tho pook or loading ooo included, suah oo t»so nmber sf sea* 
baln*rs par ear, weight of eeeh container, distribution rats, or If 1ft bulk, bat 
•eight ef the oars, icing* etc,, oad tho epprexlnete dobs that delivery eould bo undo* 



- 



The Stat© then ascertained whether or not the offer oould be accepted 1b full, 1b pert, 
er rejected* A few effere were rejected, when 1b the opinion ef the State administra- 
tion. It appeared to be unwise to make the distribution of a oertaia Item in this 
particular area* 

Allocation* were accepted either by wire er letter, depending upoB the urgency 
•f ear rollings* In either event a formal signed acceptance wae necessary, together 
with an order for each oar* Upon receipt of oar, inspection wae made, and a font com- 
pleted, showing eonditloB oa arrival, amount received, date of receipt, etc. 

The State was charged by the P.S.C.C. with the amount of its receipts and require* 
to show distribution, losses, irentory on hand, etc., through monthly reports to that 
agency* 

Zb the case of relief clients, distribution was made only to those certified to the 
local Commodity Distribution offices by the city and town welfare dope rtoente* The 
number of persons was shown for each case on this cert i float Ion, end Issues were made) 
on a per person basis only, using either meiimmi rates as prescribed by the Federal 
agency, or proportionately less to each oaee, if the amount on hand was Insufficient 
to allow maximum distribution to the entire caseload, or if 1b the opinion of the State 
office, an amount less than the maximum set was advisable* 

Zb addltioB to the distribution ef food received from the P.3.C.C* the Direet 
distribution activities Included the reoeipt and distribution of all clothing, house* 
hold articles and other Items produced through out the State on the many WPA Sewing 
Production Projects. While the Coaaocity Division did not operate manufacturing units. 
It did supply largs quantities of foods, materials sad textiles resolved from the Fed- 
eral government and other sources to the WPA Work Projects for canning and manufacture. 
Ticking, toweling, raw cotton, shooting and comforter covering were turned over to 
thie agency for the manufacture of sheets, towels, pillow easss and comforters i veg- 
etables, pears, peaches, and apples were canned* The finished products from these 
operations were in all easss turned book to the Division for distribution. 

4-^ 



Under Direot Distribution, It hi MMIMU7 for cities and towns to furnish ware* 
house spaoe, heat, lifcht, oold storage when needed, transportation and ft proportionate 
share of the State administrative toitii The oost of these facilities and services 
to the oitles an! towns amounted to 6.73* of thn value of tho gooes distributed in 
Massachusetts during 1941* 

For tho oalondar year 1941 thero oat distributed under thie program 18,446,416 
pounds of food having a value of $6.482,606. 37 dollars and 2,536,372 items of clothing 
and household articles valued at 1,159,302 .16 dollars having a oombined value of 
8,641,908.62 dollars. (For i toad sod list soe Exhibit A) 

b. School Lunch Program* Tho School Lunch Program using Federal foods was intra* 
duoed into Massachusetts and developed by tho Commoc ity Distribution Division* From 
thirty- two schools and 11,866 children in September 1938, tho program expanded so that 
on December II, 1941 applications vara on file covering 964 schools and 124,914 children 
Tho growth of this program is proof of its aoeepVtmoo locally. From studios s*u»o nni 
reports received from teachers, tho results of School Lunch Programs are "extraordinary" 
They include (1) gain in weight, (I) better attendance, (3) inoreasod mental alertness, 
(4) batter concentration, (6) hotter eating habits at home, (6) mors rapid soaial and 
personality development, (7) greater re si stance to common ooldo and other diseases* 
Greater than all the go Is the reward of looking ahead - building sturdy bodies and alert 
minds to-day for tho future* (For itemised list of food distributed to schools soe 
Exhibit?) 

o* Food Stamp Plan* Tho Food Stamp Plan and Direct Distribution have tho same basii 
Federal objectives, that of moving surplus agricultural produots into consumption at 
fair returns to tho processor or grower* State governments were usually interested in 
those programs primarily as an aid to their relief problems* The procedure used by 
tho two programs to accomplish toe work was entirely different* 

Tho Stamp Plan undertook to move surplus agricultural produots through tho regular 
channels of trade* As suoh, it had tho approval of the nation's food wholesalers, chain 



stores sad s*ny independent group* of food stores and individuals* Thsss souroos gave 
the program the principal impetus needed to get it under way. 

This plan provided the relief elient with a means of securing surplus merehandiee 
through the regular channels of trade* Purchases could bo made with thsse stamps, 
at his own stors with his own choice of the surplus items on hand, sad the amouat of 
each which he wished to purchase la relation to the amount of blue stamps la his posse* 
sslon at that particular time* He obtained his food supplies over the same retail 
counters that served his neighbors* 

The Food Stamp Plan was in op ration la forty-one cities and towns la Massachu- 
setts at the close of 1941* Purohases of oraago stamps la the amouat of over 5 million 
dollars la 1941 by certified persons resulted la the lssuaaoo of ? ,818,020.60 dollars 
in blue stamps for the purchase of surplus commodities through retail stores to a eese- 
lead of 61,356 families representing 174,779 persons, 

030AMIZATI0I AND FACILITIES 

Ope rat lag under the direction of the Department the Consaodity Division was a com- 
plete storage, distributing, sad accounting unit within itself. As such. Its personnel 
consisted of a State Director of Commodity Distribution aa Assistant Director, a Super- 
visor of Aooountiag, a Supervisor of Allocations sad Traffic, a Supervisor of Finance, 
five Area Supervisors, State office clerical personnel, a warehouse Supervisor far 
each distrist warehouse, and assistants to these warehouse supervisors where needed, 
a Distributioa Center Supervisor in eaeh city or town participating in the program, and 
additional assistants la these centers where needed. 

The Baud mm number of persons employed by the Division at any one time during 1941 
was 1,449 employees* Of this number 91% were UFA employees on a security wage, 8jC non- 
relief WPA and 4J( State employees paid from Sponsors 1 funds* 

The Division opera tod for Direct Distributioa 18 warehouses aad 161 distributioa 
centers la 101 sities aad towas and serviced 109 towns by truck under the door to 
door system* 



af. 

A emi*eaewee it a carload lot receiving aad eta rajs point, aa MfrltM approximately 
10 to 16 el ties and toman lo ated la doeo proximity to the wrabouM. It la also the 
point fresi whloh trucks handling dslivsry ta aaall towns under the doorto door system make 
deliveries to certified recipients aa a monthly basis* A distrl utloa center la a loee- 
tlaa la a eeaamnlty at which certified recipients aall weekly ta receive thalr allocation 
af cammed Itlee* Theee eentere vara generally located la unused ra tall stores* Threuji 
thaaa feel lit! at a paak load af 101 thou tax* families and a minimum lead af M thouaead 
f Millet received eaaaocitiss during 1941* 

Far the Food Stamp Plan the PI Tit lea operated 10 sales effleea la 41 ait Us and 
towns serving aa average aaaeload af 81,936 families* 

ACC3C»TI»6 AID gPXjSB 

All receipts. Issues and lessee vers reeorded a&d pays 1 sal inventories takea by 
the dlatrlst me rehouses and dietribatlea cantors each month, and mere aa reported ta 
the Ctete Conmodlty off lea, together with signed reeelpts far all lssuee la seaport 
ef distribution* These district aad laaal r* ports mare la tura aonaalldated into a 
Stats monthly report formarded to the 7.5.C.C. aad mead ta credit the State accounts 
with theea op rations. 

Approximately oaaa In aaah sis masks er less a Field Auditor af tat Division 
calls c" at * district marehouea er local eenters ta verify opera* leae aad far sen suite- 
tloa and incruetloael mork as necessary* The Audi to re took a complete physical in- 
ventory of food, clothing and containers* lecorda mare cheeked ta ascertain If 
recordings end issues ware being properly handled and to assUt in determining the 
aaouat af foods aad goods that should be ea head* Those find Inge were then checked 
against the physical Inventory la the reconcilement af anrehendlee accounts* 

Salvage af Ca-i'w lty C on ta lepra. Empty containers such aa egg crates, orange end 
grapefruit boxes, potato end flour bags, vegetable baskets, lard drum a, etc., imrt 



ecoounted for lm the same manner at merehandiae* Container a net salable vara used in 

distribution and la toed to client a for kindling and ether purpoaee, or donated te 

agenolee for one on pub lie projects • Bide ware taken en all aalable it ©ma from 

tine to time at dlatriet warehouse a, and the preeeeda of a a la a ware turned over for 

deposit lm aspeeial Comaodity Salvage Fund maintained at the State Treasurers Of flee* 

Total roeeipts from sales of salvages eoataiaors during the year 1941 amounted to 
I11.M1.01. 

In order that these aetivltles may be setter understood, eertaim tablet are 
attached to proviso a clear pioture of Commodity operations in 1941* 



(Chap. 63U) 



#7519 



AN ACT AUTHORIZING TEE COMMISSIONER OF PUBLIC WELFARE TO ACCEPT, FOR RELIEF PURPOSES, 
SURPLUS AGRICULTURAL COMMODITIES FROM TEE SURPLUS MARKETING ADMINISTRATION OF TEE 
UNITED STATES DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, PROVIDING FOR TEE DISTRIBUTION OF TEE 
SAME TEROUGE TEE STAMP PLAN, AND PROVIDING FOR TEE DISTRIBUTION OF OTHER COMMODI- 
TIES RECEIVED FROM TEE UNITED STATES TEROUGE SAID ADMINISTRATION. 

Be it enacted, etc., as follows: 

SECTION 1. The commissioner of public welfare is hereby authorized to accept and 
distribute surplus agricultural commodities, donated to the commonwealth by the 
Surplus Marketing Administration of the United States Department of Agriculture for 
relief purposes, and to supervise, administer and provide means for the distribution 
of said surplus commodities and to cooperate with said Marketing Administration in 
the sale and distribution of milk to persons in low- income groups and to carry out 
the administration of the stamp plan and the distribution of said commodities in the 
cities and towns of the commonwealth in accordance with any regulation, requirement 
or contract now in existence or which may later be made by said Surplus Marketing 
Administration, and to enter into agreements and contracts with the Federal Govern- 
ment and cities and towns of the commonwealth for the purposes of this act, and in 
like manner to provide for the distribution of any other commodities received from 
the United States or through said Administration or any successor thereto. Any 
monies contributed by the cities and towns of the commonwealth for the maintenance 
of said activities shall be paid into the state treasury, maintained as an independen 
fund and disbursed only on authorization of the commissioner of public welfare or an 
employee of the department of public welfare designated by said commissioner for 
the purpose. The laws governing the employment, discharge and retirement of employee 
of the commonwealth and the operation of departments thereof, including chapter 
thirty-one of the General Laws, shall not apply to any person engaged in carrying out 
any provision of this act; provided, that the foregoing part of this sentence shall 
not apply to the commissioner of public welfare or any permanent employee designated 
by the commissioner for authorization of disbursements as aforesaid. 

SECTION 2. No retail store, or owner, operator or employee, thereof, or other 
person shall accept, or cause to be accepted, orange- colored food order stamps under 
the Federal Food Stamp Plan, or any other federal plan for the distribution of 
surplus agricultural commodities in effect in this commonwealth, in exchange for any 
merchandise or article except food, as defined by the commissioner of public welfare, 
or accept, or cause to be accepted, blue- colored food order stamps under such plan 
in exchange for any merchandise or article not defined by said commissioner to be 
surplus foods; and no person, unless so authorized, shall buy or exchange for current 
federal food order stamps. In adopting such definitions, the commissioner shall take 
into consideration the definitions adopted froirf time to time by the secretary of 
agriculture of the United States, and, in the absence of action by the commissioner, 
the definitions heretofore adopted by said secretary shall be in force in this 
commonwealth for the purposes of this section. Whoever violates any provision of 
this section shall be punished by a fine of not less than twenty-five nor more than 
three hundred dollars, or by imprisonment for not less than one nor more than six 
months, or both. 

Approved October 8, 19^1. 



Chap. page 2. 



EXHIBIT A 



TOTAL OF DI8TRIBUTI0H 07 FOOD FOR 1641 





rvURW 


UUHMUHII 




Ere po rate* nil 


473,425 


fresh 


1,938, 884 


Cereal Hheat 


• 4V.A 

Z, 1Z3,43Z 


Cora MmlI 


1 D K T lot 

1,557,898 


Graham 'lour 


I 9 IH|M 


WWtv* 4k VI *mAAAA) 

wheat Flour 


0,0OO,7o» 


lu.CS 


l,UO£, 7 11 


urepo* rux * wuioo 


1 ssa sail 


U>glBPf mfl OarulOO 


1 K STY 
10 ,0 rT 


17180 5K1B All* 


as sas 
00 , saw 


ou&ser 


A9t zr>0 


T\«J Si**M* «■*■ 

vrieo oeens 


9 see 01s 


IU1I1QI 


1 ASS S9A 


Prune" 


1 SAS Mil 

1, ws,lvl 


T^am Anaaat salsaa sb 

yry rvmonvs 


toa OAS 


vanaOS reacnoe 


iva i ao 
1 'S, io» 


Mfc si ea si sb 




fTSin AppiOB 


a SSS QA1 

s, 001, evA 


tank OMMfmlt 


A ASS 171 
* ,*DOf 1 f 1 


trios apnoo*e 


9AO BSA 


wrmp#rrui* oegineoc* 


IAS QB1 
1VI| »oa 


reenu * hinf 


9T sas 
s7, eve 


i run fiotufi 


l*00i # / 12 


rro in waoosgo 


1 97a 
i#< 'f , oZ2 


Pwu»»V Pa r» t* r*. 4- • 

•rffM WftrrOil 


9 ICR QAQ 

z , loo, voy 


Bsoob 


• ss > at a 

57,584 




7*1 » SSK 
r%x , 000 


oalt fors 


Wt^tA *i saa 

809,194 


far j 


s i ta eriA 
£ , 1 (V, OUU 


ft V. — 1 V ,.*. ,*S 7*% — _ ^ __ — 

8ns l mm Psoans 


fi a a 09 

8,848 


WUN AppXM 


lo 1 ,yuo 


Canned Applsaauoe 


si tt a ees 

654,688 




Sltt ,OOZ 


Canned Raked Beano 


48 


frtu smi 


Q7Q oca 
o f o, yoo 


Freeh String Beans 


a a a oa 

481)487 


Ft»««S CAf*A 


OAS SSS 


Fresh Toaatoee 


961 # 118 




9 A 

mm 


Fresh Celery 


at sj 

SI f 021 


fWWwJ — ^jl gnu* 


ClflWT 


Cans Syrup 


19,312 


* w» a *» wmi 


as aoi 


Canned String Beans 


• A iAA 

89,404 


Canned Beeti 


262,314 


Canned Carrot* 

▼eaeetevsi veu a vwe 


788 880 

• tv| vfiV 


Canned Celery Soup 


17,890 


Canned Tomatoee 


218,904 


OtBMl Tooftto Jules 


1.7T4 


Canned Mixed Vegetables 


74,598 


Canned Pee Chowder 


14,061 


Canned Vegetable Chowder 


88,866 


Canned Baa Chowder 


22,174 


Canned Spinaoh 


16,548 


Fluid Milk 


87,438,183 


Cannsd Hhubarb 


T14 


Canned Beet Tops 


•14 


White Potatoee 


8.416,621 



TOTAL IUM8SB OF P0UBBS 88,448,416 



EXHIBIT B 

TOTAL FOOD DISTRIBUTED TO SCHOOL LDECBBOBS DURIJQ THE TEAS 1641 



CQMHOLITT 


POCIM 


COMMOLITT 


PO0TD6 


Butter 


816,872 


Cheeae 


1,114 


Dried Skim Milk 


64,622 


Evaporated ML lk 


400,801 


Freah Efga 


1*6,622 


Peanut Butter 


27,598 


Ccml Wheat 


61,171 


Cora *eal 


86,761 


Grahaa Flour 


68,664 


ftheat Flour 


207,671 


Rio* 


58,398 


Freak Apple a 


827,802 


Freah Grapefruit 


172,769 


Grapefruit Juice 


490,684 


Canned Loganberrlea 


14,266 


Canoed Peaohee 


164,141 


Pried Peachea 


116,642 


Prune a 


103,264 


Raiaine 


74,041 


Dried Beaae 


79,691 


Freah Cabbage 


80,126 


Freah Carrot a 


92,764 


iQxita Potatoee 


286,841 


Baooa 


4,108 


lea 


89,290 


Salt Pork 


10,488 


L*rd 


62,224 


Shelled Peeane 


8,668 


Caimed Apple eauee 


169,764 


Grapefruit Juice 


25,876 


Canned String Beana 


6,126 


Canned Beeta 


101,488 


Canned Carrots 


228,082 


Canned Celery Soup 


8,266 


Canned Tomatoea 


49,720 


Tomatoe Juioe 


2,068 


Canned Mixed Tegatabloa 


2,862 


Dried Apricot a 


16,877 


Canned Applet 


66,000 


Pea Chowder 


18,818 


Va&etable Chowder 


21,811 


Haa Chowder 


10,844 


Canned Grapefruit 


87,701 


Freah Beeta 


47,034 


Freeh Striae Beana 


2,208 


Freah Toaateee 


32,667 


Freak Peachea 


96,779 


Freak Cora 


8,901 


Canned Spinach 


1,896 


Canoed Squaeh 


24 


Freak Celery 


1,008 


Grapefruit Segaente 


108,901 


Pork 4 Beana 


113,068 


Dehydrated Soup 


11,884 


Cane Syrup 


10,687 


Canned Toaateee 


84,911 


Canned Peachea 


11,486 


Peaoh Preserve 


114 


Fluid Milk 


1,827,848 







TOTAL IUMBER OF PCUND8 6,481,664 



n 



DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP 
Hiss li&rioii A, Joyce, Director 



The principal changes in this Division during the year just 
ended were those effected by legislative action on (1) cudgel and (2) 
ne~ bills affecting the work of the Division, 

BUDGET 

laportant new requests were made under three or the four 
appropriations f i.e., all a£ve Tuition and Irans ortatior- of children 
in public schools. 
Person ^ 

A survey made by an ezpert record ended by the Children* e 
Bureau last year (sec the last annual report) had pointed out the 
hopelesGly under-staf : ed condition In which the Division has long been 
struggling. It called attention to tne serious need o:* jiore social 
workers on the various levels found in the staff; stressed the fact the 
the average case load per visitor was 14,0 children as against 45 in the 
corresponding private agencies of the state end a aasinun of 65, set as 
a standard by the Child Welfare League of America; emphasized the lack 
of enough ead social workers and supervisors and tne increasing overl § 
observed in studying the staff f roa th? bottom to the top - with the 
recommendation that the Director needed tvo assistants to cover properly 
all the functions of the Division. There was granted an Assistant 
Director, one supervisor and four social workers. The first could 
not be ip'oi ted rithin the year because of the necessity for an exami- 
nation to be eld by the Civil Service Division. T:.e supervisor was 



Appointed - to take charge of intake. The four social workers were 
gradually secured but the net gain ras that of two - since si::u; baneousl 
tv.o emergency en'nioyevs ionr. carried on the Division of Aid ar.d Relief 
payroll hut working in the Division 01* Chile! Guardianship had to be 
returned to the Division of Aid and Relief. 
Cer^ and yainteuance of Children 

The principal new requests under this appropriation v. ere 
(l) a receiving hone and (2) board all owe nee for high school children 
between sixteen and eighteen years of aj?e. 

ihe first recuest was uade in the hope o: being able to give 
to new children on the cay of their arrival in the care of the Division 
better treatment than ever has been possible in the State Rouse, and t. e 
ever could be possible no% with the progressive overcrowding here. A 
Receiving h-r»ae would be like an expansion oi the revision's nursery, at 
pre3c::t in an apartaent on Joy Street, where new babies are cared for th 
day they arrive. It would provide for ail the net> children a cleaner, 
quieter, sore cheerful lace where they could be received, registered, 
examined by the doctor, given their new clothing, given proper food when 
they are with us at lunch ti&e, and when necessary fiven baths and 
shaapoos. It mould also aak<; possible overnight care in eser encies 
and twenty-four hour isolation in the cases where it is indicated by the 
doctor's exat:ir*ation. Since the fiscal year was sore than half over 
■hen decisions on the budget were nade,yand since it was stressed that a 
deficit ..mst n ft be incurred in this ay ropriation as it frequently has 
been, it was agreed with the Budget Coo&iss loner in the su :er to postpc 
Opening a receiving hone - although allowance seersed to be nade for it 



57 



3. 

In the appropriation - until the end of the first fiscal year of the 
blenniun. 

The board allowance for high school children between sixteen 
and eighteen was requested with high hopes of being able to reeiove the 
serious handicap under vi.ich our older children labor. Theoretically, 
our children on passing the coapulsory school age-Unit zaust become 
self-supporting. In fact, those over sixteen hut still in high school 
generally have their board paid if they are boys, because there are not 
sufficient opportunities for boys to earn their ket^p in families; while, 
if they &re girls, they tvork out their keep as aethers* helpers. Since, 
in the present day, it is unfair to expect aost young people to compete 
in the esployaent field without a high school dlplonaa, we endeavor to 
have all the children who are capable complete high school. This iseens 
a severe handicap for growing girls who mist vorlc several hours a day 
when trey need the tirae for study and recreation. It unquestionably 
aeans U.at some who rould finish if they had not this handicap, do not 
finish high school; and that those who do, generally make less good 
records than they could and suffer much discouragement as well as 
physical strain* The request was made with the idea that nothing 
unreasonable was being asked - aerely justice in a day when children 
supported by Aid to Dependent Children grants, who are a privileged 
group anyway compared to children in foster hoses, have allowances ^aade 
for thea fron public funds for support until they are eighteen years 
old if still in school. Unfortunately, our request was denied. 

flffj.ee Expense. 

Tltie principal new request made under this heading was for 
aoney to install a new roaster file. The present one, installed about 



51^ 



thirty yea^s ago and containing over 130,000 rv zies, is a v\sV l» dex 
covered by glass in front tut open to the floor - wi :h each ns e on a 
very narrow strip* With tine, aany of these slips have becone loosened, 
blown dom and been swept up by the cleaners; v-ith the result that error* 
and general inefficiency are inevitable, this reruest v*-as denied* 

LFCISL/TIOS 

The L'ost i_ioortant ne^. enactments affecting the v»ork oi 

the Division were three* 

1. An *.ct regulating the Licensing by the Department of 
Public Health of Kosnitals an:! Sanatoria. 

(Chapter 661 of Use * cts oi 1941 - Apj roved October *:C,194lO 

2* An Act relative to the 5n ervision of Certain Infants in 
boarding Bouses* 

(Chapter 629 of the acts of 3 941 - approved 4ugust ~,l?hl) 

3* An Act delating to the Coa~.itaient oi Juvenile Delinquents to 
Jail and the Care of Children under Seventeen neld .or 
Eza^aij at ion or Trial* 

(Chapter SIS of thi Acts o: 19X1 - approved October L ,1 /XI.) 
The first -..f these, by -akin/ the Department of Ileal th 
responsible for the inspection and licensing f all hospitals in the 
stats, automatically removed fro*: the Division tm function of insp^ctzng 
and licensing eternity hospitals, which had been car-led by one worker 
w;.o had other important duties* 

She second extended coverage f children privately boarded to 
ail those under fourteen yr.ara of age instead oi' only nnd*?r tva. " . - -r- as 
the old provisions rf f ectiritf children imder t*ro resaln unehan&ed, children 
Between tvo an J fourteen are not a." ected ii in hosies ■ sed exclusively by 
public (i.e., state or aunlclpal) or private ajencies* The ne* ersor^-cl 
jrer; -.jested to ca-* y this nor responsibility T=as granted; but the necessary 
Authorizations, et cetera, did not cor.*: through intl'ie to set u < the new 
Df ice be. ore the end of this fiscal year* 



The third has roved difficult of interpretation 2nd 
the Adainistrative Coaraittee o" the Courts a* been working on 
the roe lea with the Department rind other exports in the Mold, 
The ner. •. ersonnel requested to carry out the provisions of z:.is Act 
vas granted* The selection o: it anu the securir^ of .special 
horses for the detention c:' the juveniles co. csmed v-er*? started 
slci iy because of nany prcbleis, including the u-icer'ain distri- 
butioft of the nev work geographically. 

Tberc tre other chsu*c?s to be r« ro~ced, -nor t o. the& the 
result m the, tiae&« 

Because of i; cr^gjv in the cost of living, Increase in fa nil} 
earnings fend i-ci^ase in the. tnnloy-- nt o;' v on en, c?-rlre.Me tester :c:.es 
;or our children have beeos* less end ie- available. At the present 
rac.- tl .-re- sill soon be an acute shortarc-, because of to. <-x ion 
oi t,..e or .ed services of ;>ur country, ae have air-;: ad/ lost on* o. our 

; oung ■ ^n, and bbc«use o. the h.^her rate of pay in th- service of 
the Federal gotrernrientj we have had a distressing anount 01' tu m-o ver 
ajo our all too fev » t onog r aphers • In.e expansion 61 the arssed forces 
has :-niit & s.oar- incr:.as« in rvusrer oi walls traents ano?»g our \,/ rds. 
The ii-.*-.d •. birth certificates a :eftg yonnr people ?-no .are t ::t-.: --ia r ; 
s: -vice, defense industries, et cetera, l^s put a nev lurden in. t. • 
staf; in the shape oi' hunting birth records and s^curirr.; .in- certi- 
ficates for a steady s tresis o^ callvrs *. ho were : orderly ir ur c~rc« 

On 4 - :st gratifying change in the set-up oi the at . ic*» that 
Was -.&de possible in the late spring v?as the on en:. of a ne?. clothing 
foot, in rooa 17» At ion-; last it became possible for the work era ir. 
th*. clothing re a to have adequate sract , light and air. 



6. 

CHILDREN IH CABE AND CUSTODY OF THF PIVISIOK 
In general, the work has gone on nuch as usual with nany 
of the old probletas continuing. One important change *aa precipi- 
tated by the concern o: the Fays and Sloans Coaoittee over the travel 
expenses of visitors and duplication In their territories* ' hereas 
the two large groups oi" worsen visitors responsible respectively for 
children (boys and girls) between the ages oi' three and twelve, and 
girls between twelve and twenty-one, had worked all over the st?-t« so 
t at two »oa -n visitors shared not only the sa^e towns but even the 
saae foster '.••ones in aany cases, a new arrangement was nade thereby 
only one woaan visitor has responsibility for all wards in both t. ese 
groups in her territory. This has meant approximate halving oh the 
area covered by a visitor, giving each visitor full responsibility for 
a foster none formerly shared by two workers, ant! the elimination of 
the need to transfer a girl fron one visitor to another whan she 
reaches .or twelfth birthday. The new districts were announced on 
July 7th and the change-over affected gradually in the quarter begin- 
ning September 1st, The advantages once this difficult Quarter end-Mi, 
should rove considerable - in saving tine, energy and oney expanded 
on travel, and in closer relationships with foster parents and girls 
in their early teens. Of course, in any one visitor* s .territory ther« 
s^y still be a visitor and guardian to older boys, a nurse visitor to 
babies under three and a visitor to Df-ntally deficient children* 

There snc-id be an increase in the number of our vards adopt; d 
since om 3 .. the tsvo new social vork jobs has been assigned to this field* 
The appointment f the new worker was nade possible too late in the fiscal 
year to affect very such the anount of work reportable new; tnd, of course, 



with the Halting period required for adoptions, the work done by the 
new appointee nay scarcely show la the next report. 
Adoption of our »*rrf 7| 

Applications for children for adoption* 

Pending December 1, 1940 35 

Hew applications 104 
Foster families re-investigated 

because of adoption request 32 171 

Withdrawn ^6 

Disapproved without complete 

investigation 21 
Roses Investigated 70 
Pending m 

Hones investigated; 

Approved for adoption ^1 
Disapproved but withdrawn 2 

Disapproved 7 ^ 

There is still an increasing demand for stale wards for 
adoption which far exceeds the number available. The young truant under the 
age of six aonths is particularly in demand, and at least a hundred 
inquiries /or infants *ere answered where no application was ta^cen. 

Purixg this year 11 children *ere placed in ne* for j 

adoption and 30 were changed from a boarding to a free basis in the same 
fcom* for t.:at purpose. Forty-six (46) children were legally adopted* 
23 girls and 23 boys. 

0£ the 46, one e;.ild was adopted bv her 4th»r and « — 
father) 21 by th^ir former foster parent,; and 24 by people *rl,o to:V then ! 
for adoption, .hese adoptions went through the courts of ten dir. erent 
counties, as follows; 

Br^Sf ? Middlesex 13 

Franklin 3 ^ u ; ;o1 * 8 

J f{ oreester 1 

Thera are no* 47 children laced 03 trial for adoption. 



4% 



The other ner worker secured wa3 assigned to vork on tha 
return of children to their :"<- >' li^a and relatives* fhis is another 
ares in which the staff has long known that sore could and should be 
done if nil:' personnel were available. Again,, however, the results 
will not. begin to show until next year because of the lttc date when 
the assignment ^as .*aade possible. 

-ho number of new children taker; into CLre this past year 
1, 373., o T * an increase of almost 13,v- over Last y^ar. Ihe r.ew children, 
as usual, c& ;te raostly because they ^ere dependent :>r neglected; and, as 
has bee-: true Tor the ir.3t few years, many uore were neglected than 
dependent — 354- as against 369. £he appltcatior.3 i*or state car' of dependent 
.children have been, as usual, thoroughly investigated with every e; .ort 
3&de to find e preferable solution from the point of vio of the cnild. The 
increase in intake of neglected children has r .hided us again of the ^n-.^ia- 
lous situation in v.hich ne Y?orkj receiving into state care children whose 
need for it re have had little or no opnortuni ty to investigate, .. lie the 
intake process i3 really carried on by the Society for the Prevention of 
Cruelty to Children and the Court. In every case of & hearing on the 
neglect of children, a visitor and guardian attends as the co->rt agent of the 
Department* according to the iaw, to protect the interest of tue Department 
and to show ceuse, if any, why the child or children should not be com it ted 
to the care of the state, However* in many instances the notice of hearing 
is not received until the day before the date set, so that it is i.j o : :->ible 
for visitors and guardians in the urban areas, *<ith heavy case loads and 
heavy court work, t;> r.al:e adequate Investigations, 

Tne following figures sho* the ?.o^k done on applicatio .s for 
the care of dependent children* 



9. 

Children >a: illea 

A plications jcridin;; December 1, 1940 
applications received December 1, 19/VO 

to Soveisbor 30,19/U 
(Involving 39 re-ap~iicati ns) 

iotal 



hd vised only 
Applications v. ithdra*m 

A-ssj.::.ed by relatives 
Assumed by private agencies 
/>s: - .i icd by nubile airencies 
Children committed Section 22, Chapter 119 

General Lavs: 
Boy 3 51 
Cirlc 36 
Foundlings: 1 raale; 2 feaale 

Children received Section 38, Chapter 119, 

General La^si 

Boys 158 
Girls 113 

Pending Decent er 1, 1941 

Total 

eh en the r^o^en 'isitors v-ere oexni-: r isx nc ' ea , one »:»3 
assigned ea en addition to the .nit caring Tor lentally deficient children 
because this "jilt has never been able, with only three vori^rs, to take 
care of ail the mentally deficient wards* Purine the past year it 
cared for l$Z children, ending the ; ear with 333. Of these, 193 are 
boarded in ;o foster hoses, 36 arc. girls placed in ica^e ho *es and Iz. are 
boys *-or*:iii£ on farr.s, in restaurants, 3/iiindries, et cetera. Several boys 
hnve been satisfactorily placed in the Civilian Conservation Corps ca-~s ai 
in a National Youth Administration residence center. Twenty-one 
Children arc being cared for in the hospital Cot t&ges at Paldvinsvlile. 
These are children suffering fro: spar tic paralysis, cardiac troubles, as t 
•ncephalitis, etc. Twenty (20) sore are being treated et the Uor.son L'tate 
hos'i al. v'he children sent there rho nave a long eriod without seizures 



533 

863 

1,396 

60 
37 
2U2 
IS 
99 



386 
613 

1,001 



306 



37 



276 
577 
1,396 



221 
A09 
1,001 



10. 

are replaced again in the co;a?itunity . In the iitate Infinaary at Tewksbury 
sors* of the group, mostly irabeciles and idiots who cannot be cared for 
elsewr.er-2, are placed. Of course, many of the children in thi* total 
group art- not only on the waiting lists for the state schools but so badly 
in need of that type o: care that it is very difficult and discouraging 
to have to nake other arrangements for them in the coaminity. Ir. the 
course of this &st year we were able to have only 63 taken Into tne 
three schools. 

Our older boys have, naturally, been *e directly affected 
by war co ditions than have the other children. -*e nave discharged a 
great many over seventeen because of th^ir enlistment in the arred 
forces - 52 having joined the Arsay, 1,2 the Navy and 7 the Marines, 
Fewer are In tne Civilian Conservation Corps 6aaps than In the last few 
years because of the sore lucrative openings that have multiplied recently. 
In fact, ve have now 63 boys tn the Civilian Conservation Corps camps t.s 
against 122 a year ago. forty-six (4-6) boys are working in the 
state police barracks, 66 on fares and 193 are in high school. Of 
all the boys between twelve and t^onty-one, we no\t :ave a larger group 
between thirteen and fifteen than in any other two year age span. Only 
five :;er cent of the total in the older boys 1 group carae to us as delin- 
quents. There nay, however, be a change in this figure when the inter- 
prets t lor. of the nevt bill relating to the cow ifesent of juvenile delinquents 
to ,1ail and the care of children under seventeen held for examination or 
trial has been worked out. 

(Tables follow) 



cr 
• 

• 

o 



p- 



P" 



H 



ro 
P* 



ro 
«• 

ro 

8 



P* 
0* 



<7N 



->4 



i\3 



ro 




m ro 



p- 
01 



P" 
VP 



O 



?o 

ON 



ro 
<7\ 



-J 

ro 



o 



fO 



On 



ro 
ro 

VJl 



on 
» 

»-• 

ro 
O 
ro 



01 

pr 



« 

ON 
O 
ro 



H* P" 



rovn 



ro 
pv«a 

ONO 



ro 
v*ro 
HP- 



01 VJl 



A3 01 

*-» m 

A3 O 



HV31 
VJl sO 

-«4ro 



Vj4 

p- 
\0 no 



HOI 
• « 

V>4 A3 

MM 
♦ 



1,0 



m 
o 



M 



HI 
O 
tt 
P 
M 

03 
O 



c 

ft 



O 



<~3 
o 

H 



03 
O 
<< 
A 



»1 
M 



HI 
O 



05 
O 
*< 
• 

« 

HJ 
O 
ct 





P 

"J 

P 



2S 

M 

O 
rt 



ft 
5 



p 



c? 
o 

D 
P« 
n 
3 
ct 



HI Q 

n 

Mf* 



























p 














ID 




o 




(ft 






I-* c o c o 


O C O 1 1 <t 










ta 


£ 3 5 - J p 3 tb 


it> 


& 






O t3 


PL 




O 




•»T I — ►* H» H- t " (A Ifi tt g 






ct 




P « 


d- rt 


j+ r* ^ H ( >™ J. 






P 


1 ■ 


lP.rftCftr*r»:: 3 3 




o 


h- 1 


'■a 




x*» ft 


S C 1 "1 " 1 3 






(a 


ct 


^ # 


P&l t^M £2j 


p. o. p ~j 4n -\ 

4*. -v 




o 


• 


p 








p 








-CO 


O O » 






• 




b 












P 




G <-» 33 


►H 1— * c~* o o o • 






• 






!5 P O 






p. 




ft: 




: H» •-. 


a. o» tJ v-< i-t ir" • 




P 


• 






p c 














-J • ~* 








• 








c* c-1- C C P 










. # 


*j *j e/3 te » 3 • 






• 




















p • o 


p ft! pr >i K • 

M J- 4 C H« H* O 

O » P P*» 




r* 
P - 

1% 


» 
• 








C3 C3 H M m o 












Ml • 


-50 o • 




H; 


• 








pr rr m d-j 




(t> 










o o o o o • 




ft 










O O *i P' H 




•i 










MM C O C • 












ft 5 


C ~* 









(2 

r- 1 



M 



g O 
P 1 



M 

ca 



c' o 



ta 



-> W 

o o c 

H- C 



1 



M K:Vo t-» M 

O v- w fc J M O I I ?o | 



M 

VJ. 



1 



\.o M M 



f I 



H M 

O 



V< K. 



O 



hi 

M M H M 



IS 



H H H M 

H r> N) 05 -0 C--{s U; H 09 
^r; vr. c^K^HCSvO C- 

















53 


















• 






H-« M 


H 


o o 


HHH 


M 


a 




► ^ 


C" 


— *. 




p p 


P P P 


P 




















P 








o c: 


r — - 




«-v H, »-: 








© 


K* 


>— S3 


c 




f» a> r 


P» 








ft 


< r* 


Li 






i3 


on 




c 




o o 


J— K- H- 


H* 






q 




t-- 1 a 


H- M H 


i — (—■ 1 M 


>— < 






^ « 






r? 




M» H* I-* >* 


p 








P* 






A d «8 


C 


p 




w 








ca a. w 


CS 










f+ 
















n ~ 












05 






C c+ 






era ^ 


• 


c 




R" 




S: « 






O M -1 




P 


P 


•— • 








z. 


O Q 


rs 




c+ 


O 








<* z 


1 rr C 




<r 


C 












P» ^ 






to 










9 e 


M- Q 




ft V 








p- 




4 P 


P K 




o 


c 






rt- < 




CT 






< 








--^ H- 




^ cs 


P D 




o 








O 






o x 




b 








3 a 




H • 


r, p *o 


















M M ~ 
















rr • 


o*< P 






H 






o 












P 










< • 








i 


















#-« 






OB • 






r O 




>• 


P 












C5 < O 






















r-* 


















vO 


r * 












4 9 6' 






P 












o p 




H 1 


C 










ft « 


«, • 


















H* 
















• « 


P>» P 


































• ♦ 


P.. | 
















• ft 


• . p 









I 

IH 

I 



P 

4 



C 

< 

It 



v0 



4V 



»-3 
O 



*-> 
C 

'li 
rf 
CD 
H 

O 

O 
OB 

o 



a 

p. 



> ♦*! O O O © 

•a f o o k^h 
*3 H- 3 3 
C8 H* c+ 
» • H- H- 

HO,3 

CP 3 
P. c+ JO 





© 

p. 



P. 



P5 

3 



(9 



a 

3 

• 

& 

3 • 
O 

• 

© • 
P5 

1 • 
ct 
S 

C • 

3 

ct 

O 

c 

cr • 

H 



s 



CT; W CO 

Boo 

M> 3* © 
10 * (X 

cr (K o 
a © 3 
a 

)-• 

© £& 



otco 

3 O CD 

p. a 

CO 



o 



3 

© cr 

H 
H* O 3 

O 



tt 

o o 

B W 

P H> 

►* C+ 
c+ H* 
c+ O 

© 3 
a 

a 



o 

w 

o 

en 



to 

O 
3 



O 



© 



O 
w 

O 
3 



ct 

© 

3 
P. 

a 



cr 

►1 



o 
o 
c 
"I 
c+ 



CD 
to 

ct 

fi 
© 

a 



c 

o 
o 



» 

I 



p- 

O r* 
<t ^ 

rt <1 

P" © 

9 

O 

3 H 
c w 

O r» 

o 3 

3 P 

r* 

P ST 
g* 

© 



H 

© 

© 

p 



© 

-J 



a- 

c 



ci 


to 



© 

01 » 
• 

» rt 
O 
H 

3 M-GS 
3 1 
IS & » 
C H » 

U < rt 

© h © 
r- h< 

r » rt 
» m rr 
h c 

gg- 3 

O H- rt 

• h sr 

• p. * 

• *-i 

s h* 

% f> 

21° 
3*3 
© 



c» 



Co 
<- g 

5E 

to £ 

© *"J 
«< 

H- 05 
© r* 

to % 

H - 
3 3" 
O « 
H 

& 

0) 



O 

rt 
P» 
H 

i 

© 



o 

to 
© 

u 



ct 
r+ 
© 
3 

a 
9 



CSJ 



f a ^ o o 

H H- P C O 
to a m« Z 3 
B O H ft t+ 
H- 3" ® M- 
to f» a £ 3 
to »1 C £ 
©US r+ © © 

p> • « 

9 
tJ 

© 
JO 



TJ E > 



3 



o 
© 

P 



o 

0) 

-ci 

P 

4 
ct 

© 



O 

Hi 

p 
cr 

H> 
H* 

O 



fD 
H 1 

P 

.: 

© 



P. © 

(S 

H« 

© 
P. 



o 
4 



a h 
p. 

H 
P 3 

«3 Mi 
3 




C ffl $ ? P 

-O t) t il & 

cc pi ss P p 

4 1 4 to 09 
ct ft <+ r* r* 

p b y -> ^ 

© © © H- H 
3 3 3 C= C 
ft c+ H H 

O O O CO DO 
H> H H Ci O 

"V *V "3 o 6 
C C fJ O o 



M HI 

3 3 

jo. a 

rt r- 

H- H 

EC C 



to c~ 
o o 

3* 3* 
O O 

o o 



O O o 



o o 



3 3 «< *< «< 

C P ? § f 
TO w 3 3 3 

r* rt 

►1 1 K « K 
M> H O O O 

5^ p — y :r 

H H O O O 

o o o 

to n 

o o o c o 

O O 4 4 *1 
H H 

td f ti 4 
M} c o o 

O '-^ *< *< 

1 i » u a 



09 

o o 

B o: 



r-f O 

n 3 

p< 

o 

rt Hi 
O 

I 

I 





3 




8 w ® r< c 


to 






• 


P. 


%3 


H* H H* H* H H- 


o 


o 


3 3 






H ,■ H 


4 4 


«< <<: 


'< 


p- a 


3 a 


o 




e c- e 


HHH« oj 


to 




p. • 


O • 

i 

fci • 


• 


>i ^ ^ 


w u oo 








? 




3 8 (8 




c> 




o 


o *a 


3* 




pc e • 


3 3 






O X3 • 


H 




C p 


3 3 


P- P- 






rt 




3 3 

p.. p.* 


P. P> 








j2 f» • 


S • 


to • 




a cc 




r'- H* 


H f- 


(8 


O 






O 3 




3 © 


rt O 


3 


3 




C 






2 p. 


p £X • 


ct « 


rt • 


o -o • 


rj — ; • 


3 © 






fB 






3 XJ 


fi a 






r* 




ea 


j3 


B a> 


u © 


r^ H 






rt • • 


C • 


O • 


r • 


£ © 




to • 




OS 


(8 


r^ H* 


i9 P- 






cn 


•a 




s o 


© p- 






to 




«v • 


CQ • 


© p.- 




rt • 




a • 


09 


3 




M 


rt 






© 




a 


09 


rt 




to 








© • 


"3 • 




ya • • 


C • 




P- * 




p. 


(9 


(9 




to 




© 






3 


P 


to 


*d 




P- 




• « 




OS • • 








• • 






• 
P. 


Xj 
© 


© 

3 


3 






• t • 


• • 


• • 


H* - - 

P. 


Pu» • 

© 


ffi • 

Pv 




• • 


• • • 


• • 


• • 


&. • 


• • • 


• • 




• • 



o 
pa 
w 
© 



s 

►J 

© 

p. 



c 

cr 
© 

H 



a 



rt 



C 
rt 



Cfl 



< 
© 
P. 



I 



£~ H» O 

O-t^ v^> fO 



i^^-*^- vi v" fvj >o rw r- Nj w ~ r-> v. i r — w v_» rv- 

O^WKj^C^V*ivO^^H^M\^HHWf>N:H^<lHOC«^^H»>OViJ 



H» (O 



5 



23 



00 % 

flHH 
H 





4) 
Q 



-a 41 

m « a> -p 

•HQ © 
Q Q 



iH rH f» 

CM 



O 



a 

4-> 



n «H 9 h 

O © 

o Q x 

PC 



•H O 
T3 • -4 
COO 
© C H 

a, q 



-*o< to 



so sd 

0i 



n c 

© <y 

<P s« G 

»H £ «H 

© a • 

25 •- Q 



o 



o 



5 



a 
+> 
o 



I 



i 



16, 



CcTitr ibutio .3 deceived towar d Support of CJ :•• 



From Cities and ?o:.ns 
Frou Parents 



$223,U0.72 
33,220.22 



£ 194,202. 29 
45,732.59 



f oreign Bo rn Child:--. n in Care of fren artsient 



Canada -3 

Scotland 1 

Italy 3 

England 3 

Ireland 3 

Poland 1 

Other Countries 1 

Total 35 



Children under cart? at the end of the year whose parents 
were foreign-bora totaled 1,032; t ose with f orfei t ~n~born aether, 
852; and with foreign-born father, 599. 

The number of illegitimate children under care was 2,666 

or 33.61^. 

Two hundred and ninety-four 0*94) children were full orphans; 
515 *ere children v/hose fathers .ad died, and 987 ci-iidren smose 
mothers n&d died. 



17 



OTHER FUNCTIONS OF THF DIVISION 
{licensing of Maternity Hospitals 

The final report on trie licensing of Liatemlty hospitals, 
henceforth to be done by the Department of Health, raay be siuacied up 
as follows: 

Licenses in force December 1, 1940 165 
(in 92 cities and towns) 

Expired 75 
Surrendered and cancelled 6 81 

Continuing in force 34 

Reissues 70 

Hew issues 6 76 

Licenses In force November 30, 1941 160 
(in 92 cities and towns) 

Corporations 129 
Physicians 13 
Nurses 14 

Boards of Public Welfare 3 

Other Person 1 160 

Two hundred and twenty-tno (222) visits were ra&de to hospitals 
for inspection and investigation of complaints. 

The returns froa the questionnaires mailed to each licensee 
show 61,635 cases delivered; 60,481 live births; 1,496 still born; 

140 deaths of aothers; 1,376 deaths of babies. 

Five (5) licenses to conduct ho ;es for pregnant woaen were in 
force on December 1, 1940. Seven (7) licenses > ere issued during zhe 
year, and 12 remained in force on November 30, 1941. 

Licensing of Infant Boarding Houses 

Again, there is a final report to xake under this 3 eading 
referring to infants under t*o years of age since, with the new law, 
a Tie-, unit of the Division will cover toardinj: houses for infants up to 

fourteen years of age» 

a 



18. 

During the last year 442 licenses to maintain infant boarding 
houses v.t re renewed or granted under the . rovisio.:s o* the General Lava, 
Chapter 119, Section 2, In 104 cities and tov.nsj 55 licenses were can- 
celled; 2 licenses were refused and 34 a plications vert j ithdrawn. 
These represent the licensed ro--.es for Infants under the supervision of 
the Co.xaonvealth and those :o zes in vhich babies wore 'laced by relatives, 
boards of public welfare and private agencies. 

T.:ere were 1,123 infants under t^o rears *i are reported to 
the Depart en t as boarded privately during the .-ear. In addition, 1,-401 
infants were Placed by boards of public welfare and various child-placing 
agencies. Les3 duplication of supervision for 75 batic-s, th. actual 
Btiaber reported was 2,449* Of t.uis nuzaber 224 were adopted and 13 died. 

Investigation of adoptions 



The unit which investigates for the probate courts all adoption 
petitions except those sponsored by child-placing apencies finds its 
volune of work still rising. A sum. .a ry of the vork of the past year 
is riven in the follov?ing statistics. 

Cases pending December 1, 1940 157 
Hew petitions referred by Courts December 1, 1940 

to November 30,1941 IPSO 1,237 



1021 



Cases closed L/eeernber 1, 1940 
to November 30, 1941 
Withdrawn prior to investigation 11 
Invwstirated and reported to Courts' 1010 

Cases pending November 30, 1941 216 1,237 



17 



19. 



Reports to Courts on corapleted investigations 
covered adoption petitions for 

Legitimate children 

By relatives 279 

By persons other than relatives 71 350 

Illegitimate children 

By asternal relatives* 319 

By alleged relatives 16 

By persons other than relatives 320 655 

Foundl ing s 5 1 , 010 

Of these petitions Investigated 5 were withdrawn and 74 were definitely 
disapproved in reports to Courts. 

661 notices were received during the ;ear showing disposition f cases: 

Approved by Department and granted by Courts 638 

Approved by Department and dismissed by Courts 2 

Disapproved by Department and granted by Courts 14 

Disapproved by Department and dismissed by Courts 5 

Withdrawn 1 
Other plan advised by Department and 

petition dismissed by Court 1 

The nuraber of investigations was 125 higher than the total for 
last year. General conditions nave accelerated presentation of petitions 
by people who have had adoption in alnds prospective adopting fathers in 
tne armed forces are anxious to aave adoptions go through before they leave 
none; and otner adopting parents, due to unsettled conditions generally, 
press for nore spe^-d In the adoption rrocess. Whereas child-placing 
agencies require at least a year's raiting eriod and in this unit we 
strongly advi3e a minimum of six nonths, we find cases of babies adopted 
within a few weeks of birth. On the other hand, it has been -ossiblt to 
Convince -any adopting arents of the desirability of psycho:.- t :*ic testing 
before adoption. 

*0f these 237 were petitions oi mother and : ;er husband. 



it 



20. 



ftoclal Service for Crippled Children 

From September 1, 19/0 to August 31, 194-1 reports on 6,456 
handicap . ed children were received by the Subdivision of Crippled Children. 
OX this nuaber 2,133 were children reported :'or tne first time and 4,273 
xerc children previously registered on whoa follov.-up reports were ade. 
The .a ferity of the reports received were submitted by local school boards 
in compliance v.ith the provisio s of General Laws, Chapter 71, Section 46A. 
An appreciable nun-ber, however, were referred to the subdivision for 
Investigation by public or private organizations or individuals i t rested 
in handicap ed children, I'he information cental od in the reports 

was complete but .uany others were either incomplete or ..ad been referred 
for special consultation service and required further in litigating „ 
One thousand, two hundred and thirty-two (1,232) children were closed out 
of the active files because they had entirely recovered ; ron their disabi- 
lity, had residual handicaps so slight as not to re* • ire special considera- 
tion, had reached the age of twenty-one years, had died, or had sieved o it 
of the state. Five thousand, t-o hundred and twenty-four ($,,;24-) 
Children were continued in our active files which o August 31, 1941 
contained information on 11,465 handicapped children. 

Rheumatic fever has been the leading cause of handicaps anong 
th« children reported in recent years. Reports this year included 1,204 
such children or ever 5Q% more than tnose with any other disability. 
Other aa Jor diagnoses in the order -i their frequency were infantile 
paralysis, deafness, cerebral palsy, congenital deformities, respiratory 
disorders, defective vision, osteomyelitis and fractures. 

A large aajority of the children investigated were found to 
be under active medical care. As aany as possible oi those not under 
care and needing treatment, were referred to appropriate clinics or 



21. 



Institutions, so that 4,447 handicapped children reported during the 
year received treatment as follows: 1,408 privately; 2,510 in clinics; 
and 529 in institutions, hospitals, or convalescent homes. Seven 
hundred and seventy-seven (777) children did not receive active edical 
care — 41 of these nad completed their treatment, and the- remainder were 
being seen by physicians at infrequent intervals or had refused iurther 
medical care. 

Four thousand, five hundred and forty-seven (4, 547) handicapped 
children received education as follows: 1,493 in their hoiaes; 322 while 
patients in hospitals or convalescent homes; 432 in suitable institutions, 
special schools, or classes for the handicapped and 2,250 in the 
regular public school classes. 

Six hundred and seventy seven (677) children were not receiving 
instruction. Two hundred and fifty-five (255) of those investigated 
had completed ti eir schooling — 47 of these were working) 32, previously 
referred to the Division of Vocational Rehabilitation, were conti >uing 
under the supervision of that division; and 2 were referred to the 
Division of the Blind for further advice and assistance. Two hundred 
and eighty (230) children not receiving instruction were as follows: 
162 were preschool children, 1 of rhoa v,as recoil . nded for mental exarina- 
tion and 1 for care outside the home; 57 were too ill for instruction at home; 
26, living in towns where there v;ere lesrs than five children unable to 
attend school, were recommended for home instruction but did not receive 
it; 3 were referred for further examination and study before definite 
recommendations could be .Made; 8 were recomiiended for hospital or 
institutional care; 8 were advised to return to school; 9 were reported 
as havi.-ig -oved and were not located; and 2, with seriously defective 
vision, were bein£ followed by the Division of the Blind. One hundred 
and seven (107) physically handicapped children were found to have mental 

It? 



22. 

handicaps so severs as to preclude hor^e instruction, and 35 others 
were out of school because of mental rather than physical handicaps, 
Itany of these children were either potential candidates for permanent 
custodial care in institutions, or w-.re those ni o should be receiving 
the benefits of training in our schools for the mentally defective. 
The majority of thea were well cared for at hone at the tine of investi- 
gation but in 23 cases horae conditions v.ere such that early institutional 
placement was recommended. 

Sorae of the special services rendered individual children 
as a result of our Investigations included: assistance in obtaining 
hospitalization or appropriate institutional care; re-establishing 
tre&tsent, end contact with the siedical social service in clinics 
previously attended; assistance in the adjustment of handicapped children 
back into school; and referral of families to local private or public 
agencies for farally welfare services needed. 

Child Telfare Services 

The title of a recent book "I'veryone's Children, Nobody's Child" 
describes rather graphically the type of children s*no are the aa in concern 
of Child >. elf are Services. Those in trouble of one kind or another 
but ot yet so seriously siV acted as t. be trou :ht under the car*:- ->f the 
Juvenile courts, child-placing agencies, or institutions, arc our cniex 
responsibility. "Everyone" is, to a^egree, anxious about these cnilJrenj 
yet, "Nobody 8 has actually assumed the burden f their care — perhaps, 
because he has not known to fchom to turn for the desired assistance. 

Child Velfsre Services, charged with the respon ibility of 
offering service to as i^any of these children as the £17,702 granted by 
the Children's Bureau will allow, has continued with its plan to rlace 



7/ 



23. 

consultants in various parts of the state. Tvo permanent consultants 
have already been appointed — one to District II and >ne to District VI — 
and one temporary consultant 1 as been appointed to District III. Since 

the two penaunent consultants cane from the fanily field, it was agreed 
that they should attend a two weeks 1 institute !• children's ^ork at the 
New York School 02" Social V<ork, and later should have three acnths' 
experience in a child-placing agency. Not; all three workers '-re in 
their respective districts— conferring eith the area visitors - f the 
Division of Aid and Relief, s&th local boards of public welfare and their 
agents, and with private agencies rendering assistance to children. 
Although t ot in a position to r.n.« --rtake actual case *vork, they are available 
as advisers in all cases involving ehlidr n, also as helpers to torn o: : icials 
and ;>ther interested citizens in alarming to n» t the needs of the boys and 
girls who are presenting problems to themselves, their families, and their 
communities. It is our hope that aany .u these to-ns di seetheir &sy 
clear eventually to eaploy social workers r/ho will render case-*o~k service 
to children in their own hones. 

The towns of Southhridge, Eturbridge, and Charlton have continued 
to enploy the services of such a person and seen tc be enthusiastic about the 
results of her vork. The town oh Webster recently voted to pay 1 rt 03 the 
sal*, ry of a child » elf are worker : ad, v. it; the assistance of Federal tn-is, 
the program in this con .unity has been smarted. Several snail municipalities 

in the vicinity of Webster will also receive the assistance -f this sorter 
and, se trust, will at a later date hear- t. eir s are f the financial 
responsibility. 

Sines the Social Security Act provides not o ly for the i\ r.;r 
of ne* services but for the strengthening oi services already in existence, 
Child v- elf are Services in this state has riven a sc. iarsnip to ?ne o> the 

7^ 



24 



visitors in the child-placing *rork of the Division of Child Guardianship. 
She is no* studying at the School of Social Service Administration of the 
University of Chicago, and, in the sun er of 194-2, after receiving tre 
degree of Master of Science, will return to her duties in this 
Comno r. * eal th • 

It is our hope to be of assistance in the coaing year to aany 
children in defense areas and to help various to?;ns and cities, where 
social service resources are inadequate, to stake plans for the meeting 
of the needs of th**ir less fortunate children. In short, we hope that 
those m o _iisht no*? "be described as "Everyone's Children, Kobody's Child" 
:iay in the near future quite definitely become "Somebody's Child." 



73 



TUITIOH of CHILDREN under the CARE and CONTROL of the DFPART^IT 



Under the operation of General Laws, chapter 76, lections 7 to 
10 Inclusive, as appearing in the Tercentenary Edition, governing 
reimbursements by the Commonwealth for tuition and transportation of 
state wards in public schools, bills received froji 269 cities and towns, 
for the tuition and transportation of 5,307 children amounting to 
♦331,997.17 --vlx., tuition $298,900.50, transportation $33,096.67 - 
were audited by the departaent and paid by the Treasurer of thm 
Commonwealth during the year ending November 30, 19 Al. The location 
of the children was as follows: 



Abington, 11 

Acton, 14 
Acushnet, 9 
Adams, 4 
Agawam, 13 

Ames bury, A 
Amherst, 28 
Andover, 6 
Arlington, 42 
ishby, A 
Ashfield, 19 
Ashland, 17 
Athol, 11 
Attleboro, 14 
Auburn, o 
Avon, 1 
Barnstable, 7 
Becket, 6 
Bedford, A 
Belchertown, 33 
Bell Ingham. A2 
DeJLaont, 15 
Berkley , 13 
Berlin, 8 
3ernardston, 3 
Beverly, 6 
3illeric&, Al 
IBolton, 9 
jtoston, 448 
3raintree, 13 
Bridgewater, 23 
Brimfield, 17 
Brockton, 81 
?rookfield, 2 
3rookiine, 5 
puckland, 23 
^urlintton, 20 
Cambridge, 60 
-anton, 27 
Carlisle, 1 
Carver, 8 
2iarle:iont, 2 
-harlton, 7 



Chelmsford, AA 
Chelsea, 8 
Cheshire, 24 
Chester, 13 
Chicopee, 10 
Clarksburg, A 
Clinton, Al 
Col rain, 8 
Concord, 6 
Conway, 22 
Dal ton, 3 
Danvers, 19 
Dartmouth 

19 AO, 3 

19 Al, 7 
Dedham, 29 
Dee rf ield, 7 
Dennis, 3 
Douglas, 1 
Dracut, 22 
Dudley, 2 
Dunstable, 1 
Duxbury, 5 
Fast Bridgev ater,15 
Fast Brooki'ield, 8 
East Longmeadow, 1 
Sasthampton, 2 
Fas ton, 37 
Erving, 17 
Everett, 5A 
Fairhaven, 14 
Fall River, 9 
FaJUaouth, 5 
Fitch burg, 8 
Foxborou^h, A2 
Pramingham, 74 
Prank l In, A4 
Freetov.Ti, 16 
Gardner, 3 
Georgetown, A 
Gill, 1 
G16ueester, 5 
Grafton, 23 



Granby, 27 
Granville, 1 
Greenfield, 32 
Groton, 13 
Groveland, 5 
Kadley, 26 
Kaapden, 16 
Hanson, 19 
Hard^ick, 16 
Harvard, 8 
Harwich, 1 
Sat.ield, 1 
Haverhill, 45 
Hawley, 12 
Heath, 15 
Bingham, 13 
Hinsdale, 3 
Hoi brook, 14 
Hold en, 3 
Holliston, 25 
Holyoke, 3 A 
Hopedaie, 13 
Hopkinton, 24 
Hudson, 75 
Huntington, A 
Ipswich, 1 
Kingston, 7 
Ltkeville, 5 
Lancaster, 16 
Lawrence, 2 
Leicester, 30 
Lejpuinsier, 29 
Lexington, 39 
Leyden, 3 
Lincoln, 3 
Littleton, 3 
Lowell, 149 
Ludlo*, 11 
Lunenburg, 8 
Lynn, A2 
Lyniifield, 9 
maiden, 36 
Mansfield, 13 



Uarblehead, 5 
Marion, 8 
Marlborough, 107 
Marshlieid, 7 
Mattapoisett, 13 
llaynard, 2 
Med field, 12 

Bedford, 67 
Medway, 56 
U el rose, 29 
Mendon, 11 
Merrimac, 6 
Methuen, 10 
Middle borough, 13 
Middle ton, 2 
Milford, 32 

111 bury, 21 
Miliis, 5 
Milton, 17 
'ionson, 14 
Hoitague, 15 
Natick, 27 
Needhaa, 1 
New Bedford, 66 
New Braintree, A 
New Salem, 11 
Newburyport, 8 

Uewim» 55 
Norfolk, 1 
North Andover, 1 
No. At cleborough, 
2«o. Broo;-:.. ield, 8 
I«ortn Reading, 2 
Norths ap ton, 16 
Northbo rough, 15 
Northbridge, 28 
Norton, A 
Norwell, 10 
Norwood, 37 
Oakham, 2 
Orange, A 
Oxford, 41 
Palaer, 73 



^6- 



Pax ton, 2 
peabody, 9 
pelham, 7 
pwabroke. 7 
Peppereli, 3 
Petersha-a, 7 
Phillip st:m, 2 
Pittsfield, 7 
Plainfield, 15 
Plainvllle, 6 
'lynouth, 14 
Plytapton, 2 
Province town, 1 
Juincy, 107 
Randolph, 52 
fcynhaa 

1940 3 

1941 IS 
leading, 10 
lehoboth, 1 
ievere, 27 
iochester, 12 
'.ockland, 11 
towley, l 
loyal s ton, 6 
Jutland, 7 
■alea, 8 



Salisbury, 3 
Sandwlck, 4 
Saugus, 33 
Scituate, 7 
Seekonk, 1 
Sharon, 18 
Shelburne, 11 
She r born, 7 
Shrewsbury, 30 
Somerset, 17 
Sorserville, 87 
South Kadley, 7 
Southampton, 3 
Sou thbo rough, 26 
oouthbridge, 7 
Southwick, 11 
Spencer 

1940 13 

1941 15 
Springfield, 24 
Sterling, 13 
Stoneham, 19 

S tough ton, 53 
Stc*, 20 
Sturbridge, 16 
Sunderland, 1 
Sutton, 8 
Swamps co tt, 4 



Svansea, 23 
Taunton, 41 

Teapleton, 17 
Tewksbury, 13 
Topsfiold, 4 
Towns end, 7 
Tyngsbo rough, 11 
Upton, 10 
Uxbridge, 18 
Wakefield, 47 
Wales, 6 
Yfalpole, 20 
Walthaa, 23 
Ware, 79 
^arehaia, 43 
barren, 14 
Washington, 3 
Satertown, 19 
Wayland, 13 
Webster, 5 
^ellesley, 17 
Wendell, 7 
"est Boylston, 3 
West Briugewater,ll 
West Brookfield, 7 
West Newbury, 11 
West Springfield, 10 



Westborough, 22 
*estfield # 

1940 24 
Westford, 28 
Westhaapton, 1 
'Restrains ter, 10 
Weston, 1 
Westport, 15 
Westwood, 6 
fteyaouth, £1 
Whitman, 9 
ffilbrahaia, 3 
Williamsburg, 14 
Williaajtown, 3 
Wilmington 

1940 1 

1941 40 
Kinchendon, 13 
Kinchestev, 31 
ninthrop, 1 
T'Oburn, 182 
Worcester 

1940 6 

1941 39 
Wrent.iaa, 10 
Yarmouth, 2 



7J" 



STATE BOARD OF HOUSING 

FRED A. DAKIH, ' 3HAlHMiH 

- i 1 rr T J 

(See also Annual Report of the State Board of Housing) 



DIVISION OF JUVENILE TRAINING 

Charles M. Davenport, Director 
Walter C, Bell, Executive Secretary 

(Al Mt. Vernon Street, Bos ton) 

See Annual Report of the Trustees of the Massachusetts 
Training Schools 



INSTITUTIONS UNDER THE DEPARTMENT 

She following brief statements relate to the general 
supervision of each of the five institutions under the depart- 
ment. These reports are followed by comparative and r:ore detailed 
consideration of the financial administration of the institutions, 
Further details about the fcork 01 the various institutions may be 
found in the institution reports which are published separately. 



THE TZTWKSBURY STATE HOSPITAL AND IKFIRMARY, 
TEWKSBUEY 

Lawrence K, Kelley, LL,B,, M,D. , Superintendent 

Provides infinaary care for needy persons not chargeable 
for support to any city or town. Insane persons and those with 
contagious diseases are not admitted. 

See Annual Report of the Trustees of tile Tewksbury 
State Hospital and Infirmary 



INFIRMARY DEPARTMENT AT THT STATE FARM, 
BRIDGESATER 
/ 

(Under the DepartEent of Correction) 

James A, Warren, Superintendent 

Provides infinaary care f & indigent persons (nale) not 
chargeable to any city or town. 

See Annual Report of the State Earn 



7& 



MASSACHUSETTS HOSPITAL SCHOOL, CANTOH 



John E.Fish, M.D., Superintendent 

Pro Tides cere and schooling Tor the crippled and deformed 
children of the Cosuaonwealth; a school with hospital facilities* 

See Annual Report of the Trustees of the 
Massachusetts Hospital School 



lyka:? school for boys, wzstborodgh 

Charles A* DuBois, Superintendent 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for 
delinquent boys under fifteen years of age; cottage plan. 

See Annual Report of the Trustees of the 
Massachusetts Training Schools 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR BOYS, SHIRLFY 

George P. Campbell, Superintendent 

Provides custodial care and industrial training for boys 
over fifteen and under twenty-Gne years o: t£e; only boys under 
eighteen nay be admitted. 

See Annual Report of the Trustees of the 
Massachusetts Training Schools 



INDUSTRIAL SCHOOL FOR GIRLS, LANCASTER 

Hiss V. Marion Rollins, Superintendent 
(appointed 7/24/41, succeeding Hiss 
Catharine ii. Campbell) 

Provides custodial care and Industrial training for delin- 
quent tiirls under seventeen years of age at time of Cossitiaent. 

See Annual Report of the Trustees of the 
Massachusetts Trsjfuing Schools 



SUPERVISION OF INSTITUTIONS 

In the atter of financial sure-vision, the department er. nines and 
analyzes Institution expenditures, keeping constantly in r.;ind the 
function of the institution and the relation of its business to the 
care, education, and welfare of the Lnates. The following tables 
are designed to sho* in detail the financial condition of each 
institution. 



7? 



TABLE X. PART I. - Capacities and Population of the Fivo Institution* for the FUeal Year 

ending November SO, 1941. 



DAILY AVE RAGS NUMBER 

PRESENT ANY ONE TIME P RESIST DURING THE YKAR 



institutions 



atrial School for Boy* 

liustrial School for Girl* 

raAB School for Boy*. . • 

moehusetts Hospital School ..... 
Mksbary State Hospital and Infirmary. 

total* 



1 

Honaal 


Largest 


Smallest 


1941 


Nuaber 


Nuaber 


Capaoity 








994 


US 


198 


227 


281 


248 


225 


294 


406 


366 


272 


321 


516 


269 


ISO 


240 


5,600 


2.829 


2,171 


2,446 


4.836 


9.969 


9,016 


3,474 



1940 



266 
228 
340 
212 
2,796 

3,321 



1999 



279 
241 
299 
292 
2.896 

8,929 



TABLE I. PAST II. - Inventory of the Fivo Institutions. 



HEAL AND PERSONAL ESTATE 



Land 



adas trial School for Boys. 

iatastrlal Sohool for Girls 

yaaa Sohool for Boy* ......••« 

assaohusetts Hospital Sohool 

Iswtobury Stato Hospital and Inf iraary. 

Totals. ......«•■ 



Aero* 

892.29 
868.80 
679.18 
166.72 
916.00 

2,921.94 



Valua 

192,623.60 
20,776.00 
87,626.57 
41,806.00 
84,679.94 

9287,910.01 



Buildings 



$651,689.95 
479,268.27 
895,016.66 
786,195.91 
9,405,143.01 



Personal 
Property 



$161*652.51 
115,183.17 
181.482.dl 
194.048.90 
898,414.10 



Total 
Value 



$898,966.26 
616,217.24 

1,194,022.14 
962,048.41 

4,081,187.75 



56,218,200.70 51.178, 782.6* $7,628,892.80 



I: 



TABLE XI. - Receipts of the FItb Institutions daring the Fiscal Yew ending Moreaber SO, 1041 



PROK THE INSTITUTIONS 



PRCS THE TREASURY 



IBBTITUTIOHS 

J! 

adus trial School for Boy*. . . . • 
fedttttrial Sohool for Girls . • . . 

pun School for Boys 

lusaohuiette Hospital Sohool. . • « 
ftrksbury Stat* Hospital on* Infirmary. 

Totala 



Beard 
and Car* 

of 
Patients 



Perianal 
Sorrioea 



Sales 



Rents 



Other 
Receipt s 



$ 69,594.70 
141,020.74 

♦211,016.44 



$6,868.35 

657.81 
1,294.68 

428.60 % 217.00 
6,168.98 1,262.18 

118,671.09 11,478.18 



$216.21 
47.99 
116.11 
26.04 
496.98 



Total 



16,671.66 
886.60 
1,409.46 
70,066.64 
148,688.78 



On Aooount 
of 

Maintenance 



$188,026.62 
140,718.78 
294,467.20 
224,702.07 
1,274,622.96 



far 

Special 
Purposes 



far 

Trust 

Funds 



#901.28 9226,966.94 12,182,486.68 



160.00 
142.09 
880.00 
$622.09 



$18.78 



Total 

$188,076.88 
140,787.68 
894,809.89 
284,708.07 
1,274,652.96 



Total 
Reeeiptt 

$194,847.18 
141,128.88 
296,016.76 
894,766.41 
1,428,886.74 



$18.78 $2,122,977.47 $8,849,844.41 



USTITOTIOHB 

Isaastrial Sohool for Boys. . . . 

Industrial School for Oirls . . . 

tyaae School for Boys ... . . 

sMsashusettc Hospital Sohool. . . 
tstkabury State Hospital and Infirm ry 

Totals. . . 



TABLE III. - PART I. - Expenditures of the Fire Institutions for the Fisosl Year ending November 80, 1941 



HAISTRHANC1 



Trotel, 
Transpor- 
Hsat and tation 
Other Oarage and 
Plant and Office 

Operation Grounds Expenses 



Personal 
Serrioes 



Medical 

and 
General 
food Gere Para 



Re- Pumish- 
ligious Clothing ings and Repairs 

Xnetrue- and Household Repairs, and 

tion Materials Supplies Ordinary Renewals 



TOTALS 




188,088.88 
140,718.78 
294,487.20 

mt, Too.ee 6u,o»u»»e v,a»o.4.« > t »i,.eo i», obw.au a,o«x.«' *»»av»wo a,*aw.uu e,*oo*OA *,ooo.uu e,«uv«ev timiw 224,708,07 
642,076.66 879,088.98 68,081.40 86,860.07 94,202.99 8,661.46 6,062.20 8,889.76 66,696.81 47,071.79 84.680.41 88,812.06 1,274,632.00 

.$l,188,21S.76e865,826.88e71.417.11§87,8S1.27S186,165.76$14.S85.OOel0,829.16$lO,062.76$88, 647.6W60,96e.ei*42,941.96#43,77O.82 $2,122,436.63 



TABUS III. PART IX. - Expenditures of the Five Institution* for the Fisoal Year ending Bovaabar 80, 1941 - Continued 



FOR SPECIAL PURPOSES 



Furnishing 
and 

INSTITUTIOBB / Land Building* Equipping ttieoellaneoua Total 



Industrial School for Boy a. .... 

Industrial Sobool for Girls .... 

Lyaan Sehool for Bo/a . ..... 

Maasaahuaetta Hoapital Sehool. ... 

Towkabury State Hospital and Infirmary. 

Totals 



0530.00 
1880.00 



$80.00 
142.09 

#192.09 



180.00 
148.09 
880.00 
$522.09 



TABLE III. PART III. - Suamary of Expenditure for the Fiscal Tear ending Borember SO, 1941 - Concluded 



ISSTITUTIOBS 



Maintenance 



Special 
Purposes 



Trust 
Funds 



Total 



Industrial Sehool for Boys. .... $188,025.62 

Industrial Sehool for Girls .... 140,718.78 

Lyaan Sehool for Boys 894,467.20 

aaesaehusetta Hospital Sehool. . . . 884,708.07 

towkabury State Hoapital and Infirmary. 1,874,888.96 

Totals $8,128,486.68 



160.00 
148.09 

m 

880.00 
1682.09 



#18.78 



#18.76 



#188,076.62 
140,787.68 
894,609.89 
284,702.07 
1,874,862.96 

#8,122,977.47 



TABLE! IT. 



Expenditure and Set Weekly Per Capita Cost of the Five Institutions for the Fiscal Tear 

ending Hoveaber SO, 1941 



WEEKLY PER CAPITA 



BET WEEKLY PER CAPITA 



IHSTITUTIOHS 



Expenditures 



Ay* rage for 
the Three Year* 
1941 1988, 1989 and 
1940 



Total 
Receipts 
froa 
Refunda or 
Salaa 



Set Coat 
to the 

Institution 



Average for 
the Three Yeara 
1941 1988, 1989 and 
1940 



Industrial Sehool for Boys. • . . 
Industrial Sehool for Girls ... 

Lyatn Sehool for Boys 

Vatsaohasetta Hospital Sehool. . . 
Tstkitary State Hospital and Infirmary 

Total a 



♦188,088.62 
1*0,718.78 
294,487.20 
224,702.07 
1,274,888.98 

$8,188,488.88 



118.88 
11.88 
17.89 
17.88 
9.99 



812.97 
11.82 
17.88 
16.94 
6.91 



86,868.88 
848.87 

1,802.41 
428.60 

8,821.60 



ft 31, 869.27 
140,878.61 
298,164.79 
224,278.47 
1,266,201.86 



$16.86 

11.81 
17.81 
17.49 
9.96 



♦12.77 
11.78 
17.28 
16.91 
8.87 



♦11,762.88 $2,106,664.40 



TABLE Y. Payroll of the Five Institutions, showing total number employed for the Flsoal Year 

ending November 80, 1941 



AVERAGE SWBBR 
EMPLOYED 



AVERAGE MONTHLY 
CCKPBKSATION 



WEEKLY 
PER CAPITA COST 



SE&BSR OF INMATES 
TO ONE EMPLOYEE 



IEBTIT0TI01B 



1941 



1940 



For 
the Throe 

Years 
1988, 1989 
and 1940 



1941 1940 



For 
the Throe 
l^T'hSB 
and 1840 



1941 1940 



For 
the Throe 

Yeara 
1988, 1989 
and 1940 



1941 



1940 



For 
the Three 

Yeara 
1988, 1989 
and 1940 



Industrial School for Boys. .... 

Industrial 8eheol for ©iris .... 

Lyes School for Boys . . .... 

Kassaahusetts Hospital Sehool. , . . 
tseksbury State Hospital and Infirmary. 



96.00 


106.00 


106.00 


♦92.12 


886.18 


♦88.68 


18.67 


♦7.91 


♦7.40 


2.8 2. 


6 2.6 


61.89 


84.68 


8T.84 


78.86 


79.67 


78.49 


6.26 


6.77 


4.67 


2.8 2. 


7 2.7 


148.64 


146.88 


147.86 


94.06 


98.18 


91.44 


6.68 


9.18 


9.80 


2.2 2. 


8 2.2 


188.81 


148.89 


144.19 


89.08 


88.77 


87.86 


U.62 


11.86 


11.49 


1.7 1. 


7 1.7 


661.70 


676.86 


688.08 


60.97 


81.80 


60.81 


••04 


4.61 


4.61 


8.6 4. 


4 4.1 


1,119.04 1,168.80 


1.178.81 


$484 • 44 


6489.00 


♦488.77 


<• 











THE COUNTY THAI KINO SCHOOLS 



Under the provisions of General Laws, Chapter 77, Section 2, the four 
county training school* for truants and habitual school offenders are 
subject to visitation frost the department, which la required to report 
thereon in its annual report* 

ESSEX COUNTY TRAIN I KG SCI 10 L 

Lawrence, ;«ss. 



Jan* 1, 1940 
J«n. 1, 1941 



Jan* 1, 1940 
Jan* 1, 1941 



Jan* 1, 1940 
Jan* 1, 1941 



Boys attending school 
Boys attending School 

Discharged during 1940 
Admissions during 1940 

Full capacity 

Budget appropriation for 1940 
Het expenditures for 1940 
Budget appropriation for 1941 



Bio* 49 
No* 44 

So. 27 
Bo* 22 

NO. 71 

#46,300*00 
45,080*00 
43,200*00 



HAMPERS COUIJTY TRAINING SCHOOL 
Feeding Hills, .'as a. 
Agawaia, Mass* 



Soys attending school 
Boys attending school 

Discharged during 1940 
Paroled 

Admissions during 1940 
Full capacity 

Budget appropriation foi 1940 
Net expenditures for 1940 
Budget appropriation for 1941 



So. 29 
Mo* 29 

Ho. 16 
No. 13 
Mo* 29 

So. 60 

£38,000.00 
32,877.36 
28,000.00 



rOROSSTSB COUNTY TRAINING SCHOOL 
/ Ofakdale, lass* 



Boys attending, school 
boys attending school 

ijischar^ed during 1940 
Admissions during 1940 

Full capacity 

Budget appropriation for 194D 
Net expenditures for 1940 
Budget appropriation for 1941 



No* 50 
No. 54 

No* 28 
No* 32 

Ho. 60 

£31,000. 00 
33,625.00 
31,000.00 



7^ 



XI2DLBS2I QOVr'TC TRAIWRO SCHOOL 



Ko. Chelaaford, Kaaa. 



Jan. 1, 1940 
Jan. 1, 1941 



Boya at tending a shoo 1 
Boya attending aohool 



*o. 116 
Ho. 119 



Diaeharged during 1940 
Admissions during 1940 



Ho. 68 

Ho. 61 



Pull capacity 



No. 155 



Budget appropriation for 1940 
Net expenditures for 1940 
Budget appropriation for 1941 



$77,000.00 
76,996.38 

77,000.00 



The name a of the Superintendents of the schools are aa follows t 

Eaaex County Training School, Lawrence, Jassea H« Tetler 
Rarcprten County Training School, Sprin&f laid, (Feeding Hi 11a ) 

Incises F. Sullivan 
Hlddleeex County Training School, Herth Chelmsford, 

J. Earl Wot ten 

Worcester County Training School, Oakdale ('west Soy la toe) 

William £• Teachout 



SUPERVISION OF THE SETTLED POOR RELIEVED OR SUPPORTED BY CITIES AID TOMB 



General Laws, chapter 117, section 3, and chapter 121, sections 7 and 16, 
provide that the Departsont of Public Welfare may visit and Inspect all places 
where city or town poor are supported in families, and require the Departaent 
to visit, at least once a year, not only all children who are maintained by 

the Commonwealth, but all minor children who are supported at the expense of 
any city or to#n. Children Illegally retained In city or town laf ira&ries 
■us* be removed tnerefroa and placed at board at the expense of the city or 
town concerned. 

THE SSTTLFD ADULT POOR PBQTXDFD FGJrt IB FAMILIES 

Of the 415 adult persons reported by local authorities as fully supported 
In families on January 1, 1941, two were in their o»n noses, 40 had died, and 
98 had been removed before visits sere aad*« The records of the r ©Raining 275, 
142 sen and 133 wosen, were reviewed and reported on by the Department 1 * agents. 



They were supported 


by 121 cities and 


towns 


as follows : 








> bins ton, 


2 


Bel cher town, 


1 


Coh&sset, 


2 


Franklin, 


I 


Adams, 


2 


Beverly, 


4 


Col rain, 


1 


Gloucester, 


1 


A jaw* a, 


8 


Biiierica, 


1 


Danvers, 


3 


Grafton 


5 


Aaesbury, 
Amherst, 


1 

3 


Bolton, 
Bourne, 


1 

2 


Dedhaa, 

Deerfield, 


3 


Granby, 
Great 

Barring ton, 


1 

12 


Andover, 


1 


Brewster, 


/ 


Dennis, 


3 


Hampden, 


1 


Arlington, 


4 


Sriafleld, 


1 


Dighton, 


1 


Hancock, 


1 


Ashburnh&a, 


2 


firookiine, 


2 


Douglas, 


1 


Hanover, 


1 


Athol, 
Attleboro, 


2 
3 


Buckland, 
Ch ester, 


2 
2 


Duxbury, 
Bast 

Bridgewater 


1 


Heath, 
Hinsdale, 


1 

2 


Auburn, 


2 


Chicopee, 


2 


Frving , 


1 


ffolbrook, 


1 


Avon, 


2 


Clarksburg, 


1 


Foxbo rough, 


3 


Holden, 


1 


Barnstable, 


2 


Clinton, 


6 


Fr a ainghaa, 


7 


Hop/, in ton, 


1 



TBI SETTLED AWL? POOR PROTIDED FOR IJf FAMILIES 



Bull. 


1 


Kilford, 


1 


Palner 


2 


Stonehaa, 


3 


Hun tins ton. 


2 


Killbury, 


6 


Petershaa, 


1 


Stoughton, 


i 


Kingston, 


2 


Hilton, 


2 


Phillips ton, 


1 


Stow, 


1 


Lancaster, 


1 


Monroe, 


1 


Pittsfield, 


3 


Sutton, 


1 




3 


fconson, 


1 


Plyciouth, 


1 


Swanpscott, 


2 


Lenox, 


3 


Jlatick, 


1 


Piyapton, 


1 


Teapleton, 


1 


Leoainster, 


2 


jleeah&a, 


* 
3 


Quincy, 


1 


sare, 


1 


Lexington, 


6 


kewbury, 


1 


Haynha&, 


4 


Walpole, 


2 


Ludlow, 


3 


8e wburypor t , 


1 


Reading, 


3 


^arenas, 


3 






fieW 










said en, 


2 


Marlborough, 


2 


Reboboth, 


2 


^aylsnd, 


-> 

3 


Manchester, 


1 


Horth Ada/as, 


3 


Rochester, 


1 


Sell! ieet, 


1 






Worth 












'iaricn, 


2 


At tlebo rough, 


1 


Russell, 


1 


Westf ield, 


2 














West 




M&ynard, 


1 


Sorthborough, 


1 


Saugus, 


1 


Springfield, 


6 


HedXield, 


1 


Horth Heading, 


1 


Sberbora, 

w 


1 


Weyuouth, 


5 


■elf yst , 




nor lv;!| 






j 






fcidClebo rough, 


5 


Uorwood, 


6 


Springfield, 


1 


Wilaington, 


1 


Sid lie ton, 


1 


Oak Bluff a, 


1 


Stockbrldge, 


2 


Wlnthrop, 


2 



Yanaouth, 2 



Their ages were as follows* 9 between 21 and 30; Z between 30 and AO; 
28 between 40 and 50; 63 between 50 and 60; &4 between 60« and 70; 50 between 
70 and 80; 29 between SO and 90; 3 between 90 and 100; and 1 was 10A. 

For their sup port there was paid Is 13 cases froa $2 to #3; in 27 cases 
froo $3 to 14; in 235 cases— aostly of old and feeble persons— the rata 
varied froa 4U to f 20 per week according to tha amount of care required. 

Of the whole mraber 123 were reported to be in good or fairly good 
physical condition, and 233 in good or fairly good rental condition. There 
were 22 able to do light *ork either in the house or about the premise*. 
In 257 cases, according to reports, the ©others of the local board of public 
welfare complied with the law requiring thca to visit these persons at least 

?i 



once In every six aonths; in 5 eases they were visited once during the 
year; in 13 cases they were not visited at all* 



Ac shown toy the <!«p«rt«#nt , » visitation of the 1,540 ehildren reported 
if the suthoritiee a* fully supported outside the Inf irmerlee on January 1, 
1941, end July X, 1941 9 ?04 had been restored before visits eould be aade, 

and 3d uere exporting t heat el Tee. The remaining 1, £93—71 a boye end 680 
girls were supported by 9d olties end towns te follows t 



AM net on 


1 


Everett 


2 


Bedford 


1 


Redding 


8 


Ad*»s 


6 


Fairhaeen 


8 


Klddleborou.-'h 


4 


Boehester 


1 


Andover 




Falmouth 


6 


Hiddleton 


1 


Seekenk 


2 


Arllr^ton 


9 


Fitohburg 


5 


Milfard 


1 


fihrevebury 


1 


Athol 


r- r 


Gardner 


IS 


? illlmry 


1 


Soaervills 


14 


Attleboro 




ftloueeater 


A 

IS 


Hon son 




Bouthbrldge 


m 
s 


Snrnatfcblc 


7 


Or if ton 
Sreat 


1 


Montagus 


1 


Springfield 


11 


Belmont 


1 


Harrington 




Needhaa 


1 


stonehoB 


5 


Beverly 




Ksdley 


1 


lieu Bedford 




Stou hton 


1 


Billarlea 


6 


Holden 


1 


Beu 

Marlborough 


1 


Taunton 


? 


0o t ton 


?ao 


olyo c 


1 


Keuburyport 




tfrbrl&ge 


? 


Bralntree 


4 


IpfiWflOh 


1 


Hevton 


14 


Wtlpole 


1 


Bridgwater 


1 


Laneester 


1 


Korth Andover 


1 


WaXtha* 


1 


Broekton 


11 


I awrenee 


1 


north Beading 




varehem 


B 


Brookfleld 


1 


i-eieeeter 


? 


Norton 


1 


barren 


? 


Brookllne 


4 


I.eoalnster 


16 


Norwood 




Watertovn 


1 


C rver 


5 


! exlngton 


1 


r riser 




way land 


1 


It) rlton 






14 


! el has 




debater 


4 


Chelsea 




L'^dlov 


1 


nttsf leld 




*elle«ley 


2 


eTerkeburft 


1 


Lunenburg- 


1 


Plymouth 




*est 

Rprir^f laid 


1 


fc^lton 


1 


Lynn 


19 


Quinsy 




*eetfield 


1 


Dedham 


4 


Kalden 




Randolph 




Westminster 


4 


Dennis 


1 


Marlon 


2 


Raynhas 




vest port 





wfs»ukkt m*e« qkiu>?>£* *nn will a i fiicfraa fck orraia* i fijuuiuls 

(Continued) 

Weyecuth a 

vmiftBctotfii i 

winehendon 16 

Vlnchester 1 

lor a«ster 1£5 

Yarmouth 1 

Of the whole number 18 were cere4 for and treated i?\ hoe itals end 
institutions. There wars 1*03? who attended school slid £3? who did wore 
or Is ss work about tlie house. Of the whole number l 9 26B were In fc ood or 
fairly good physical condition, and 1 9 ?M in good or fairly good cental 
condition, Ths prloa of board varies froa |l*oO to C-6,50 per week* thsss 
children wars found to be wall eared for with a f aw adaptions which have 
been bro^e^t to ths attention of tha local boards of public welfare* 



THE PENALTY IKCUREED Bl CERTAIN CITIKS AND TOWIiS 

FOR FAILURE TO 1£AKE 
TBI IR KETORSS OF POOR RELIEF DURING THE &OHTH 
OF APRIL, 1941 



Under sections 3^--35 of chapter 117 of the General Lavs, 
the departuent reported to the Treasurer of the Cosnon- 
fce^Ith the naaes of the cities and tov;ns rfhich failed to 
^ake their returns o:' poor relief during the month of 
April, 194l# together with the aaount of penalty incurred 
in each Instance as follows: Bell inf- ham, $7.00; Freetown, 
$12.00; Hanover, $8.00; Katli-ld, $3.00; Holbrook, $9.00; 
Lrnnfield, $5.00; Kaynard, $9.00; Monroe, $8.00: He* 
Marlboro, $2.00; Petershars, $3.00; Piainfield, (13.00; 
Russell, $S.0O; Sandisfield, $20.00; Sunderland, 13. Cj; 
Sellesley, |JL4.00j 'ueyaouth, $3.00. 



e sees 5sv» sCsr sastsss 

State Board of Housing - Parson 1 '. ' I 
Stat* Board of Hou.i^ - ^'l 
Befande prior yeare . a *^* nM "- • ,1 

T»r poraonal eervloee of of f loar. •J.iit.ion of Aid and He! 

"yaws as^^sas^- -r: t 
"sri^sssr*- - ~~ - ':• 

Zar •* •wrent year and n~*Jn 

Old am i^.rft.^! *2 oth9r «t«ta WTwJbf 

J?' SJ^J "r: la «« »r offloor. and «X MrUlon of Child Guar 

■■u^Lt*-^ pU " i0 •• ho °i« of ohlidx«|th» top^rtwmt of Public 
- • ur £ at f*""" «*a prnlra year. . I . 

9*3£E5? JET**?! 5 **»• ; "»utl<i sJaployeee In the DlTlilo 

Training, of floe of too True tee ■ . . I 

ir^^Ii-^*^^** t 5f* HMML lnoludJof the annual report, t* 
> bwT°,*" 2 ^?f!** M of the 'board ueftffloe euppliee and equ 

For «iiSS.? f Ju *f nil » Gaining, effle. dl« 

For «;r rl »V <rf «*enta in the paroled and boarded 1 

L«n.Sf* t~' P P*"wl, lnelsflKnpweee of the agent. 

for SLS^.?^?* •* ai P»«** and .uppliilf 

f» rlt~' I 1 ******, ■*41cal and oth«r qftntal to the ear* of boj 

for^01?ir ** rTl °*" •* •*•*»■ i« th» dtlldrle paroled from «*• a 

'T.^TTJ 1 ^, •XPoneae of the oald agMti.Iirii paroled for board, '■ 
f.I^.iSJr 1 ' 1 e other thu ■H f op off lee euppllee ai 

.*n^? aM !f w,t ,f «n« town) forfohlldren on parole fron 

attending the publle eohoole. . . . P 
I*' "alnteaajwe of the Industrial School I 
w •alnteaanoe of the Indue trial school i 
Hi * the ban school 

p" I!** 1 !*"? 3t **« Hospital and Inf lmflp «mg« eyetea 
for , „fL , tpte a »"Pl*al and InTinur/ftfor male lmatea, fumli 

Vraaa School fop Boye, InproTenmCe «#»»• 
!" Jfhfcl ftr Boj,; Water «*m T 

kiUS: "Chnol for Girle, DaMujee t« | lf .<upair.;d. • . • 

St=*. n»_\ OB e0 «««nt of relebur ■ .pport of lnnatei 
■t«te Hoepltal and Infl^sry, State few, and & Hoepltal Schoo 

... ... . . . 

©id a^."s^?f^ ,, ° wia >««. ». *. »» at 
I^ ^^ .V^oL» : : • : : 

«fSSs tessss: te sss 8W1 - 



\l\ l*f\ m ?' 9 ** 1 f^« 2* pwUne anpropriattona 
*■* 'a 14 «7 reoelP»< froa federal OoTomnent 

13) Pal a by stSa ^**»*lgL i»imVtssmmsU a ■ na P.-oln., Commit 



a,. 



The principal items of thin rrhort 
liave beencheclred v:ith 



Wtt 




FART XX 

FRIT ATE CHARITABLE CORFQRATXOM 
Arthur 0. Rotoh, CJommlsr loner 

supervisor* 

Kiss Florence 9. Dickson Kiss aUm m. Molntire 

•Miss Mary c. Robin ton 
Government supervision of private charitable corporations la provided in 
C Vf* legislative enaotaents, the first of which requires the Department of 
Public Walfer? to investigate all applications for charitable charters, while 
the second and third oall for annual inspect ion and annual reporting. In the 
following pages of thia part of the report the function* of the department and 
the year* a work under thee* several statutes are explained, This statement is 
followed by a tabulation of some of the essential figures lowing the financial 
condition of the various charities* 



Investigation of Charitable Organisations Seeking Incorporation 
General Laws (Tor. Ed.) chapter 180, section 6, provides that the department 
shell investigate, give a public hearing, and report its findings to the Secretary 
of the Commonwealth, in all eases of charitable organisations which seek a cer- 
tificate of incorporation. During the year ending Bcvsmber SO, 1941, 04 appli- 
cations for charters have been referred under the provisions of this statute. 
The department has completed its investigation, given hearings and reported 
on 44 applications* including 4 received prior to the beginning of the year. 

Action has been taken by the Secretary of the Commonwealth on 43 applica- 
tions as listed below. Thirty-four (34) of these petitions have been granted 
and charters issued, while 9 have been refused. 
Agora (Penny) Organ! ration. Inc. 

Alumni Association of the How England Conservatory of Kuelc, Inc. , The 
Ankara Orphan Aid Association 
Apostolic Council of Ministers * Churches, Inc. 
Baltic Amerioan Society of Rev England, Inc. 
Boston Speech Foundation Incorporated 
Cadmus School, Inc. 
C&sp Hayaetan, Inc. 
Club Frfenoals, Inc., l« 
♦ Defence Volunteer Fire Department (Inc.) 

Dubno Ladies Helping HYnd, Ine. 
Eaiex County 4-H Club Ceap 

Fall River Area Council. Boy sooute of America, Inc. 

Franklin Alumni Association, Inc. 

Free florvay Association. Inc. 

Girls' Clubs of Boston Incorporated, The 

Bolyoke Children* s Aid Association, Inc. 

Invalid Pensioners of the World War, Inc. 



si 



Klwanis Club of Orange 
Klvanis Club of Whit In ■rill©, Ino. 
Leominster Olrl Scout Council, Ino. 
Margaret Pallor House, Incorporated, The 
Martha ' ■ Vineyard Hebrev Con tor 
Massachusetts Cllnlo of Physiotherapy 
Massachusetts Community Centor, Ino. 

Massachusetts General Hospital Nureee Alumnae Association, Ino., The 

Milton Girl Sooute, Inc. 

New England Keewlok Ino. 

North End Community Center, Inc. 

104th u. 8. Infantry, Veterans Association, A. E. P., Inc., The 

Reading Council of Girl Sooute, Ino. 

Revere Beaoh Associates Ino. 

Shield, Ino., The 

South Qulnoy Dramatic Club 

Sun Charitable Foundation, Incorporated, The 

True Church of Christ, Ino., The 

Ukr an lan American Citizens 1 Club Ino. of Taunton 

United Jewish Appeal of Greater Lynn, Ino. 

Veterans Civic Association of Taunton, Mass. Ino. 

West End House Auxiliary, Ino. 

Vestwood Scout House, Ino. 

Whispering Willows Camp, Incorporated 

window Shop Ino., The 



Supervision of Charitable Corporations 
General Laws (Tor. Ed.) ohapter 121, section 7, requires the Department 
of Public Welfare, upon the request or with the consent of a charitable corpora- 
tion, to make annual Inspection or Investigation of such corporation. 

During the past year supervision of Incorporated eharltles has been con- 
tinued through visits and conferences by the supervisors. There have been 205 
inspections Involving many consultations and visits to Institutions. 

There have been 718 inquiries regarding particular charities and general 
matters related to the field of private charity. 



Number and Classif loation of Incorporated Charities in Massachusetts 
Of the 1,488 charitable corporations which made returns to this department 
during 1941, 188 are homes for the aged; 148 are hospitals, sanatoria and other 
institutions for the sick; 148 are nursing societies and other health agencies; 
288 are ageneles giving family service and relief; 186 are child- serving 
agencies; 198 are youth agencies; 94 are settlements and neighborhood centres; 
and 111 are federations, foundations, and community chests. The remaining 209 
form a miscellaneous group chiefly oivlc or eleemosynary in their nature. 



Annual Reports of Charitable Corporations 
General Laws (Tor. Ed.) ohapter 180, seotlon 12, provides that a charitable 
corporation Incorporated within this Commonwealth must make to thle department 
an annual financial return on or before the first day of November in each year, 



and further provides that If Any corporation falls for two successive years to 
sales ths report, the Supreme Court may decree its dissolution. figures from the 

financial reports of corporations for the last year are given on the following 
pages. The abstracts are arranged by towns In alphabetical order under each town. 

An analysis of the returns made In 1941 shoved the total property, real and 
personal, of all these charities to be $414,008,009. Subscriptions and donations 
amounted to $25,261,501. Earnings and refunds, including receipts from benefi- 
ciaries, vert $52,174,361. Reoelpts from interest and dividends on Investments 
totaled $9,909,410. Legacies were received to the amount of $4,681,681. Total 
current receipts were $64,719,844. Total current expenditures were $63,798,576. 
Total paid for s alar Is s and wages amounted to $26,940,868. 



Corporations Dissolved 

In 1941, 88 corporations were dissolved, 81 by a decree of the Supreme Court 

and one by legislative aot. The list follows »- 

Amerioan Irish Pioneers Foundation 
Arwlle Inc. 

Boston Zexmer Association "Inc.* 

Cape Cod Educational Foundation 

Children's Singing Guild, of Newton, The 

Edward Hatch Memorial, Ino. 

Emergency Relief Committee of Fltchburg, Inc. 

Florence Crlttenton Rescue League 

Franoo- American Club of Revere Inc. 

Hopital Louis Pasteur 

Hutchinson Horns Corporation for Aged Women 

Industrial Defense Association, Inc., The 

James W. Hale Fund, Trustees of the 

Ladles' Kennel Association of Massachusetts 

Lowell Welfare Foundation, The 

Macoabee Associates, Inc., The 

Maiden Hospital Associates, Incorporated 

Massachusetts Division of the International Sunshine Soelsty, The 
Meretz Young Men's Association 
Phineas 0. Parmenter Foundation, Inc. 

Roosevelt Infantile Paralysis Commission, Incorporated, of Fall River, The 
Three-fold Movement - League of Neighbors, Fellowship of Faiths, Union 
of East and Vest (Incorporated), The 



Registration of Foreign Charitable Corporations 
General Laws (Ter. Ed.) chapter 180, section 12A, requires a charitable 
corporation incorporated elsewhere than in Massachusetts, which engages in charl- 

♦ 

table work or raises funds within the Commonwealth, to file with the department 
(1) a true copy of its oharter or certificate of incorporation, (2) a true oopy 
of its constitution and by-laws, and (3) an annual report on or before November 
first. Approximately 75 foreign corporations are complying with the law. 



f 

I 



Ro Endorsement of Private Charitable Organizations 
fhe Department of Publlo Welfare endorses no private charitable organisation 
or agenoy. This rule la absolute, regardless of the known standing of any ruah 
soolety. Inspection and the publication of the annual return in this volume do 
not mean approval ) on the contrary, Inspection may mean the discovery of condi- 
tions calling for condemnation. No agenoy le warranted, therefore, In using the 
faet of Inspection in euoh manner aa to lead the publlo to believe that the de- 
portment approves or in any eense commends lte work. 



SEE 

BUREAU OF INCORPORATED CHARITIES 
FOB 

ABSTRACT OF REPORTS OH 
CHARITABLE CORPORATIONS 



CUT AKD TOWS INFIRMARIES 



Qm Prank McDonald, Supervising Inspector of Infirmaries 

EXHIBIT X 

Lews foisting to Infirmaries 
(General Laws* Chapter 47) Tercentenary Edition) 



For the inf ormatlon of boards of public welfare, superintendents 
of infirmaries and others concerned, certain laws relating to infirmaries 
are here summarized* 

The Department of Public Welfare is required to visit annually 
all city and town infirmaries, and to include in its annual report a 
statement of their condition and management, with its suggestions and 
recommendations relative thereto* (General Laws, Ch. 121, Sect* 7* ) 

The superintendent of every infirmary must keep a register* 
in the form prescribed by the Department of Public Welfare, of the 
names of the persons received and committed, the cities or towns to 
which they belong* and the dates of their reception and discharge* 
(General Laws, Ch* 47* Sect* 8*} 

Every inmate of an infirmary able to work shall be kept 
diligently employed in labor* If he Is idle and doee net perform 
such reasonable task as is assigned, or if he le stubborn and die* 
orderly* he shall be punished according to the orders and regulations 
established by the directors* (General Laws* Ch. 117* Sects* 21 and 22* 
See also opinion of Attorney-General given to State Board of Charity, 
November 21, 1904*) 

The only children who can be lawfully supported in a city or 
town infirmary for a period of more than two months aret {%) those 
who are eo defective In body or mind as to make their retention in an 
infirmary desirable) (2) those who are under two years of agej and (3) 
those who are under three years of age* with mothers who are Infirmary 
inmates and suitable persons to aid in taking care of them* In eases 
of failure of boards of public welfare to remove children illegally in 
infirmaries* the Department of Public Welfare is required to remove them 
and provide for them otherwise* at the expense of the city or town con- 
cerned, (General Laws, Ch* 117, Sects* 36-38.) 

Provision is made that tramps and vagrants* if physically able* 
shall perform labor of some kind, and shall be lodged under conditions 
prescribed by the State Department of Public Health* (General Laws* 
Ch* 117, Sect. 20*4 

The Department of Public Welfare is authorised to advise with 
and assist local boards of public welfare in preparation of plans for 
Infirmary buildings* (General Laws* Ch* 121* Sect* 38*) 



INSPECTION OF INFIRHAHIKS 



There are in Massachusetts 104 Infirmaries* As required by 
law, every infirmary has been visited at least once by the department's 
inspector* 



Recommendations are mode at the time of Inspection where need 
of i.Tjprovament la obvious ♦ 

Attention Is directed to the fact that the Department has not 
the power to enforce recommendations* The Statutes provide that the 
Department visit an Infirmary and as a result of such visit make such 
suitable recommendations to the Welfare Board of Cities and towns as 
would be necessary* 

INFIRMARIES CLOSED 

During the past year the infirmaries at Easton, Fitchburg, 
Ho Ills ton, Ipswich, Lancaster and Newton dosed* 

HB& CONSTRUCTION 

There have been no new infirmaries constructed during this 
year* Improvements have been made in a great many Infirmaries to 
their present structure* 

INFI RMARY VISITORS 

The infirmary visitors are local residents, giving their 
services under the Commissioner* s appointment* Ifcose In office now 
ares Andover, Mrs* Frank L. Brlgham; Boston, Miss Theresa U* Lally; 
Easthampton, Mrs. M« J* O'Neill; Fall River, Mrs* Joseph E. Barret 
Fitchburg* Mrs* T* R. Sheaf Greenfield, Mrs* Henry F. Nash; Holyoke, 
Mrs* John M* James; Lancaster Miss Mary Belle Bailey; Maiden, Mrs* 
Catherine A* Love Joy and Mrs* Ellen Woolfson; Manchester, Mrs* Grace L* 
Porto ri Marlboro, Mrs* L* H« Tourtellotte; Montague, Mrs* Richard R* 
I Nantucket, Miss Mildred H* Brookes Hewburyport, Mrs* Frederick 
North Adams, Miss lone Northrup; North Attlebo rough, Mrs* Henrietta 
W* Livingston; Northampton, Miss Clara C* Allen; Some rvi lie, Mrs* 
Marguerite £• Kauler; Springfield, Mrs* Laura H* Congdon and Mrs* 
Katharine R* Hatch; Towns end, Mrs* James H* Bennett; Waltham, Mrs* Anna 
Fogg} Warren, Mrs* Edna Do land* 

HB*ROVEHKHTS 

Adams, painted downstairs of man's dormitory. Installed 
drinking fountain, covered one floor with linoleum, replaced mattresses 
pillows, sheets, cases and spreads* Painted dining rooms, kitchen, 
and papered living room, repainted beds, bought new curtains for main 
house for some of the windows* Athol, laid three linoleums, inside 
papering and painting* Attleboro,, changed wiring throughout infirmary, 
installed electric pump* Ayer, painted bedrooms and halls and repaired 
bathroom* Barnstable, general repairs and upkeep* Barre, extensive 
repairs on buildings on account of hurricane* Billerica, general repairs. 
Boston (Long Island), new men's dormitory, new cafeteria for employees 
furnished with electric stainless steel equipment. A new 1200 ampere 
generator, new toilet, bath, lavatory, steriliser- hopper facilitis, new 
laundry, addition to incinerator, 45 feet of drain pipe laid and two 
manholes laid, 550 feet of wooden fence placed, purchased new shock- proof 
tube for x-ray. Animal yard outside the Pathology Lab* remodelled, new 
cages for animals, new Sollux heat lamp, complete re conditioning of 
medical director's house inside and outside* Purchased Ford-Ferguson 
Tractor with snow plow and hydraulic lift, also 2$ ton trailer* Beautified 
grounds surrounding chapel, substituted old wooden crosses in cemetery 
with numbered concrete markers* Cambridge, cleaning and painting through- 
out the building, complete renovation of women's hospital solarium and 
children's nursery, complete survey and repairs to fire alarm system and 
fire extinguishing apparatus* 




Clinton, w«P*A* progressive project — entire building renovated* 
Concord, new plumbing, storm windows and other repairs to house. 
Duxbury, part of roof shingled* Easthampton, redecorated all inside 
woodwork* new tractor and truck, shingled outside of cow stable and 
main barn* Pall River, installed regulation refrigerator, re shingled 
main building roof, remodeled store room, kitchen and two rooms for 
nurses* FranlflLn, painted four rooms and screened back porch. Greenfield, 
interior decorating and painting, installed new boiler* Haverhill, 
repairs on boiler, installed fire lines and stations, installed return 
lines on steam system, repairs on house, roof and gutters, general repairs 
and painting outside* Holyoke, new roof on fsain building, boiler house 
and coal pocket, new linoleum on big dining room, painted and repaired 
walls and ceilings, also beds and corridor* Hudson, purchased new kitchen 
stove, new sink, two enamel tubs in laundry, painted and varnished floors 
and 52 chairs, plastered two ceilings* Lynn, new gas stove* two frialators 
1 slicing machine, 1 grinding machine , new wiring throughout institution, 
new dispensary complete, interior of building painted and refinished* 
Reception room for inmates, new metal chairs for ladles r ward, boilers 
rebuilt, steam lines repaired, smoke house completely renovated* Barbie- 
head, repairs on plumbing, new mattresses* Medford, shingled barn, 
inside painted, protection of steam line under sun parlor* Milton, 
general small repairs and improvements, Sewburyport, new linen closet. 
Inside repairs and improvements, also painting* North Andever, new garage 
doors, inside repairs, improvements and painting* Pittef ield, new boiler, 
painting and general repairs* Plymouth, improvements and repairs to 
infirmary* Province town, new wire fence* general painting and papering* 
Quinoy, improved first floor bathroom, repaired chimney and furnace, 
purchased new gas stove, enlarged hot house, re papered dining and bed rooms 
Rockland, general painting, broke up two acres of new land* Stenehsjsf 
new fire escape* Taunton, general carpentry end roofing, painting and 
glasing, hardware and iron work, plumbing and draining, masonry and 
plastering, electrical work, heating and ventilation* Uxbrldge, new 
showers and other bathroom fixtures, new plumbing, new floor and linoleum, 
new radio* Wakefield, new ice chest unit, new hot water back for cook 
range, new cement floors, gauge on Oil tank* Waltham, 10»bed addition 
and sun parlor, enlarged smoking room, built a cow litter upstairs 
in barn and moved cows from basement* Ware, general repairs* Watertown, 
general repairing and painting* Wes thorough, painting, repairing and 
shingling* Eeatfield, constructed storage barn, new toilet installed, 
new armchairs, rubber matting in hallways, new ventilator ir cow barn, 
repairs on water line, painting and varnishing* Vest port, new electric 
refrigerator, inlaid linoleum, new floors and hot water system* 
Winehendon, new linoleum, general repairs* Wobum, seven rooms painted 
and papered, general repairs where needed* 




gff 



t 




H» H*t HO H 



9i" ? 



5 ! 




If fii 

3 g 



• 

a 



f 



s 



3. o<> o 

2 



Sir 1 ! I 



9 If 



HHHHHM 



* * • 



ft- 



** W It 



« w % % 



* % * « 



0000000(001 oc 

LgSeiiLPKl 


>oppp©ooopa 
! o» co> 8 2 6 a to 1 


ooooooooooooo 


,400* 

,000, 
,200. 
,000, 

,000. 

>406» 



















138 



CO 

i 

a 

as 



3 



►ft 



O M 
OK 

3* 



r h 



*3 M T> 
H 5S M O 
0*0 



IRE 



igps air 



535 
•Iff 



|ISISI|lfIIf|f| 




DCCCOCCCCOWQO-aaCO 
ppppppppSppODppp 

IsSgoJis'Sgtigg OCp HO Cifcc! y S a£E 



8? ^ CO &> CT H S3 



Sift I! fi £ ;3 £ 19 ft 9 1? ft* - 51 ft© ft H ft ^ft *8 l*ft SI 2 ft ft ft ft £ ^•S** ft ft P ft £ £ ftfe ftftft 

oocu»toooo^ot3Hl^OHt^PO^orooo!^-l^GO«cC(OGrooo^5p^«)Ooot^^»© 
• • ••••••••« • • • •«*••«••••*•••••»••••••••««••••• 

K8*.3«Sg{2«PoiJS8toa > 8oe38ti8S:o«.8882S*>SB 



q 

Mf 

E 



i % \ 14? »g? if 



i 



i 



I 



i 



£ i 

* 

ll 



*3 



£1 g a 




ifflfili 



ff N SM t5f &»a irff »l EEa 




* « « % * % % * * • « % « 

jj8p8 P^PPPPPP j*PPP; 



!§S88 



p^pppp s % ^^ppl^ p^p^p^ 




17 



JNsjfeara Rallaasd 



tba fallowing lafometien emtn goblie relief whether randarad 
la institutions er outside, and aid rendered by ell pnfelis 9&*ml— § ehet-wr 
state or l«nl« fha totel msober of persons *i*e<5 emptor* In tteble X 9 alee** 
fba roaalalas tablet naslyss by *gs 9 ceir acid nativity, the ouster of peraase 
as Osaerel Relief oaly 9 enittdng tfeasa aided by reason of un©s$loyw«t t end 
the tabulations are eaasladed by figures for aaet of all relief* 

feble I shave the mseber euppartad or relieved by tbe sitles end 
tssns during the year beginning April l 9 1M0 # and aocfinj Ifcreh II, Ittle 
■ U a e r is n a era laalodsd^ regardless of est&laneKte tabs! auaber ra» 
jststini aid ia any fare* «»lnai*» of vagrants sad sayfarara ana 544 9 Hae 
Of this aud>er Sla 9 8M vera aided sn aeoouat of ansraplayrwat. Mostly to 
their vm fconee* the sseBefrdJsj ttt 9 l§8 la esaprlsad of t*s> foilovrlngi 
Ola *«s Aaal*t*aee t XQO,m reoiplaatai Ud ta ftptajtaa* Chil4raa 9 ** 9 S72 
sad f6 # Uft shreaie gsnsral relief saaaae Of the fB # U0 ahronio ganeral 
ralief saeea 19,165 ears aided la lsetltttioas sad ft,** outside, aitfear 
ia privets fasdliee or thair sen hos»e« Of tha seraoaa aidad la institutions, 
t 9 i3* vara relieved la the varleon aity and tea* laflranrlas # leaving 10 9 ©6* 
aba ears aarad for ia ether institutional tt should be notad t&e* oertaia 
eitlee shien have city hospitals baas sat repart sd persons aidad therein 
under "poor relief.' Of the outside aid, e # «$ aaaaa wore aidad ia private 
food lie* atfeor tbsa their ova, aMia 60 9 040 aara reported sa having been 
aided to their sen ha— Se 

fable XI supplies the data far psrsons sided or raliaaad by the 
Coasjaaeaalthe Ia addition ta aid randarad ^ rootly ay the nmmmm 1«> 9 
this table lasludes aasea in aMon the relief baa base randarad by the several 
el ties sad teeaa in the first instance end these eltiee end tonna baas boon 
reimbursed by the Cs— asanaltfco 



tablo nt oaooo tho Mwan* of «* ppiMti U tho jjpitMl proof 
during tht ^ (600 foot oa%o») Ao pmlotMdi oaplaiaod, 1% obould to 
n a mi ml tao* porooao «1M % mw of ooa^ojooaojo) ul&Uti Dopooooao 

OdidTM tt»«MA®» AOtlOtftlWO imn tft fseluM froa thlo tftblt oad tt* 

following ***looo Tim porooao oho pMiil oat of ooro during tf* 
Mi i o i f Sl^ta* theoo la this total ftllUld V <**th auafcor 8,808 oad 1,614 
porooao ooro troaofciTrodt At tho olooo of tho t2*ioforo # tho 0— — i Pith 
had 44,840 porooao raaklrxlryj la thlo sm^« 

feblo XV aoglno olaooifiootiaa of the auaoor of thooo psroeno by oelor, 
aattao/ too* Of tho 76,110 porooat 00 oldod, 88,881 ooro oOoo oad 5T,W 
foaolm Tl» »tlvo»bom ohltaoi 80 ,087, aaatoor noro thoa to&oo tho forotga bom 

fotto T glooo o further taalyolo of tho uatioo*oora porooao atdod during 
too poor olooolflod by paroao nativity* tho porooao Of 11,00* ooro both ttfttlvof 
14,118 oofo ohUdroo of foroi£a*bora poroatof 10,808 oofo parento ooo of afeoo ooo 
fort I nborn or uabaoaoi uhilo tho nativity of pfcronao la 4,868 eoooo oould not bo 
aooort*laod« it oppooro, tho*oforo # that of tho 96,118 porooao rooolvlag old 
during yoor, thorn on ot Sooot 88,048 Oho ooro oltaor forolga»bem or ooro 
of tho flrot foaerotloa la oar oltiowohlp* 

By Toblo VI it oppooro that of tho 98,118 porooao analyoon, 4,104 von 
under floo yoero of agog 18,860 ooro aador flfboamj 81,908 noro aador toontp) 
80,080 ooro ooooooa tuonty ond olxtyt ft * 8S,066 ooro ovor ifrot ogo« Tm ogoo of 
1,808 ooro nataoaa* 

Aaoag ^a> poor porooao relioood tboro io oloojo a oonoideroblo auaber 
of ooatol dofoottooo oho for eno rooooa or another htm aot boea aaanlttod oad oro 
therefor* aot oared for la tho fpoeial laot l tutlaat oaoh oo t o eoatol aoopitalo 
aoiatoiaed for tl*t purpeee* Za regard to thio olooi it in to be aotod further 
that olaoo ao court hat peoood upon their aaatni eoa&tlea, thoir alesoifie&tlea 
io ando hore beeauee, io tho opinion of tho reopeetlve outhoritttoo coking tfco 



re bar**, thare Is as doubt of their defeat* table TZZ afford* ft class if lo atlas 
late thwt groups, aeeording to the nature ef the defeat, end ft division by sex* 
Tho total uumbar thus oarad for wi 880, nwaaly IM sales aad 114 roaalssi 7m 
hundred mwm$ mm (221) of thoao oaaoo vara railroad by oitiae and towns) Stoe 
reaeininf 28, having aa settlaa*rrt, vara aided at the expose* of the Cweaaaaslth* 
sixtywf ive (66) of the abole nusbar aero elaaaad aa Insane meetly the senile 
and cdl<Oy laeaae to be found la the InflrBerlee* thie total inaladee 87 aalee 
and 26 fettle** Ob* hundred fortj^aeven (let) aere aalled ldletle 9 sanely T6 
sale* and 72 fsanlee* The epileptlee total** 88* of whom 22 ear* sales aai 
16 faealas* 

teal* Till ealls attention aore peist*<ily to the ees eat aatare af 
diaaharge from relief of the** persona who passed eat of aid during the year* 
Of the 81,278 eaeaa *e dlselesed, 16,9Cw vera aalee aad 14,569 ear* faae!*** 
th a n relaeeed to the ear* of relatives or frieada Bsabersd 0*789, tr ans fer r sd 
to ether Institutions 1*414, aad <&**hargad without relatives or frieada or 
ether authorities aureolas to look after tl^am* 18,723* The great aajority la 
thia leet croup aere pa reena assisted thresh illness, after aft*** they beeeaa 
ealf -supporting again* 

A* appear* frea **ble XX the foreign bora aha aere receiving publie 
relief darlas the year aaabar 29*630* Canada furnlshe* 6**47 af thia number) 
ragland and Sales* 1*562) Gerasny, 838) Ireland, 8,821) Italy, 9,865) Kussia 
aad Poland, 2*068) Saaadinaria, 828f Soetlead, 592) and all ethor eountrie*, 4*117* 

table X eases the peroentage of the various olisaea to tho whole 
auober* Haas* af th* 76*118 pereeas analysed, 74*88 per eoat ears eettled eases 
aad 25*11 per east sere aeeettled* As to the plaee la which relief was given* 
2S*4S per osat ef the total were aided la institution*, sanely 12*81 per east la 
infiramries, 8*78 per oaat in stats inatitutions sad 7*80 par ©eat in ether 
institutions, neatly undor private aaaa^siant* Outdoor relief, designated as aid 
•outside*, was given la 74*67 par east of all the asses* east ef these, aaaaly* 

JoO 



68*11 par oen% # ifSM la their eon b«Mt Aid aea &vm to private 
MUM other Hun to* r*eipioat»e mmbmU| boards eeeoe— la Mi pa* 

par Mat we tutiomi the aaos of toonty era end elxty, tad t8*M per wot 
sixty or error* ft* «£** mt UN per eent were nnkaoaa* Mtoia 
60*94 per eent ead feralee 4ft*e* par eent* »a aueber of oolored 
W7 amll, totaling only t*tt per eersU 

ay reeeon of eaaellest a oaa) l Ul oa la (ft* eere of dofooUvoo, the 
parociiUco of tbeoo wntally defieient pereena a till eared for ee poor relief 
oaeee U to—iUncly end tende alaaye to doereaae* aontal ooaditiea 

of all th* eeaee eaelyeed shoo* that »WT por ooat were eane # *fl» por ooat 
*or* Tuoiiw, *19 par ooat mo idiotic end *£§ per ooat ear* eplloptie* 

1% to of further latoroot to toera the auaoriool relation to tho 
afcole poaalaMaa of «a> peroeao relieved ot pablto expenee oa eialyaed la Table *l* 
able* eeaibite tho maber of eeeh eiaa* la eeery tbooamad of tia population of 
too Ceanoneeelth oa o baeto of too ooaeae of 1*40* torn it to eheaa tae* la 
oeea thoueaad of tho popnUUoa there aoro UMtQ iadigeat pereone roXtovod at 

nimmn _ «ht aoator aajfrojea Iota Oeaetal Boltof eeaee, oael a dlag 

elded beeanoe of eaeaplayaeat, aoro Ife* ia o laoaooad* Of ttieee* 
M| am a*|ee aai a*Te aero feaelee* Tho native bora nuabered tt#t* ia tho 
thotamadt foreign bora, S»d6f neti*e bora of farelffi parentage, S*8T| oad tfaoee 
•f eakneaa nativity, Tho proportloa of aagreato roportod aoo WO to tho 



Coot of Poor Boltof 
Tae feada oaaoadad by the eittoo oad toana far oil poor roliof 
within tho fiooal jeer oro ohooa la Table XII* the ofisrogato to eloaoiftod oa 
•ordinary" or aatotenenee. and -extraerfimry- or epeelal. Tao a « » tdVfc mm 
ordinary outlay* are ftfcoaa tho roooipto oa oaeooat of aaintonanoo* oad the 



dlfferanoe eat oat under "net ordimiy expe»!lt»aW Tho trdliaij ratty U 
elaeoiffed m expenaee in tcetitetioae end outsit The oafeKftetaa HUM 
the elaeeifieAtiaft Is Table I warding the nature «ai place af ele« The pan* 
total la Table in Am that an ttfiifm of $O»,B01,84O«Oi xmt laid out lr 
the M«ml o It tae end toane* Of tfcie eaa* S0» # 0#6 # |*e*4T *** ordinary outlay, 
or aaAnteoanoe, aa iaereeea af fV»&8,@B5eS7 aoor loot y«ri the fmiadw, a* 
: 19i # 94S^a # oaa expended for aundry b^ftwi&ti at the oitjr tad tow laftraariee* 
Of the nooey MM fc j for aeirifceaaaee, ft^41£ # 919^S «M expended for lnflnajy 
eare end C1 # ?6*,70:US£ for relief la otter iattltuttoctt. Core la private faxdliee 
teak ' 79&,480.?T end relief la the reelpUnte' am aanee, Ue* outdoor poor 
relief, totaled SSl # 488 # 967 # a0« The mm of t a0,9«,»t. W act expended far OU 
Aeele tenee, aa taoiaooa of $a # 906 # 67MS ovor 1840* to flgare far outdo or 
roUaf eheae a deeroaao of $i f 8N t l5U0 aw the aawft— year* The aaa af 
W^iWyWMi aoa appended for Aid to lapenden* ChUdran* Tale eapoaditwe oaoaa 
aa t a o r o oo o af ttfUyBDun* fa* eeet af aaaiaUtrmUoa, laeledtas oalary aai 
offloo oxga a p o a af Ilia laool pnalle aalfaro board*, oaaa to HjmjNMim The 
total rooalato aa ani e nt of er&z&ry waaaal Utt oo nor* $S?,tSl^&4«0f — elaeeifled 
oa reeeipta aa oo oa aot af iaflraariaa, *210 # Slla?f oad all other, $19T # &00*64* 
Subtracting i eoatpai looooe MajMajtMaat oa the act ordinary outlay* 

Za fieata xm t&e amlyei* aaoaa far eitiee oad torn by Mia X n la 
oorriad oat far oaaoo aided out of the otato ftajfte* Of the eiT 9 a46,988«06 
e xpen de d for tfcie purpose, fl7,841 # Q$€ # 18 «aa aa aeoouat of ordimry expend! tar ee, 
laid out aa folleaei at tho Toakebury State Soopitol and Xnfinary, CTA6 # 06U» # 
at the State Fara, N6S*66, at tb* Saaeaahaeett* Foapltal School, $113,093,4$ aai 
all ether expendituree eatoido of iaotltatioao # eifi*S82,4T3*19* fetroardlnai? 
expendituree totaled $?,88U87, all expended far epeeial iapreveaento at tho 
ooaeral inotitetioae Juet enaarotod* Xaaaaaoa ae it la iapeeeible to traoa la» 
otitutloe expendituree to the ooparata Indlrldanle recaivirvr the aid, the figoree 



set out under tfa» state table* of cost are arrived at by taking from tfat net 
eost of aaintenanss that proportion ehieh the average taster relieved la the 

Institution beers to the average innate population of the institution* 

In Xafcls XXV state a:=d leoal outlays are added, shoeing that of the 
49,«H,08£«11 emended for public poor relief, f 48,241,849,62 nee for ordinary 
outlays, of which ?4,612,«&U80 sent for institutional relief and $41,783,92T*4S 
see for relief outside* the total of extraordinary expenditures was C'l&2,T8&*49e 



LAWS AFFECTING THE DEPARTMENT 
PASSED BY LEGISLATURE OF 1941 



Chap. 44-AN ACT PROVIDING THAT MINORS liAY P"TITION FOR ADOPTION 

OF their natural children 

Approved February 28,19-41 

Chap. 63-AN ACT AUTHORIZING THE LEASE TO THE UNITED STATES OF 
AMERICA, FOR NATIONAL DEFENCE PUKPO£FS,OF CERTAIN AREAS IN 
CERTAIN STATE FORESTS. 

Approved £&rch 8,19-41 

Chap. 65-AN ACT REGULATING THE DS1 OF RECEIPTS FROM THE SALE BY 
CITIES AND TOFNS OF FEDERAL SURPLUS COMMODITY STAMPS. 

Approved Liarch S,1941 

Chap. 94-AN ACT PROVIDING FOB TEE PAYMENT BY THE COMiSQNIEALTK 
TO THE USITED STATES OF AMERICA OF A PORTION OF THE PROCEEDS 
OF SAL?£ OF STATE FOFFST PRODUCTS RESULTING FR03 OPERATIOHS 
Of THE CIVILIAN CONSERVATION CORPS* 

Approved 'iarch 13,19-41 

Chap.l91-AN ACT RELATIVE TO COsSPLAISTS FOR ESCAPES FROH THE 
TEKKSBUKY STATE HOSPITAL AND INFIRMARY 

Approved April 23,1941 

Chap.l96-AN ACT PROVIDING THAT INMATES OF TEE TFV7X8BUEY STATE 
HOCF'ITAL AND INFIRMARY MAY BE REQUIRED TO PERFORM LABOR. 

Approved April 23,19-41 

Chap.201-AN ACT PENALIZING THE UNLAWFUL POSSESSION, HANDLING 
OK CONSUMPTION OF CERTAIN LIQUID!* AND ARTICLES BY INMATES 
OF THE. TEKKSBURY STATE HOSPITAL AND INFIRMARY. 

Approved April 23,I9A1 

Chap.327-AS ACT RELATIVE TO L^.'TAL AND PHYSICAL EXAMINATIONS 
OF DELINQUENT CHILDREN. 

Approved Kay 26,1941 

Chap.3U-AN ACT PROVIDING FO^ NON-PROFIT KFDICAL SERVICE PLANS. 

Approved 23, 194-1 

Chao.351-AN ACT MAKING CFTTAIN CHANGES IS THE GENERAL LAWS 
IfECTSClTATED BY THE CliANGE IN THE SAME OF THE INSTITUTION 
FORMERLY KNOWN AS THE STATE INFIRMARY to TNT TEWRSBuKY STATE 
HOSPITAL AND INFIRMARY ANF CERTAIN OTHER BISOR PERFECTING 
ChANGES. 

(Sect. 1-43) Approved June 4,19Al 



ttttft T.- 9tatar of 9rtlw t«ii tar W tapyorto* or taUowd Farias t*» T«r oaStac *»•»*> »» 



total 

SsfcVoo 
Toroljn 



em** 
taut 


state 


total 


w,*ss 




sum 


10*6*0 
S.OW 


Mi 

S,SS* 

t,7« 


2Z,4» 
14,1» 

10,903 
4,t« 



TABU TO— Vts^xr of roar Ponram Stqgjgrtod or tell**** Mm *** Taw •adlng ten* Si, 1*0. •l«lfUd 

CitlO* 

sctk* or ssusv «a* stato rata 







CttSor 8 


f to 


t 


10 to 


u 


a to 


» 


SO to 


H 


a to 


29 


3© to 


34 


» to 


S3 


40 to 


44 


4S to 


49 


fO to 


54 


« to 


C3 


CO to 


44 


45 to 


69 


TO to 


?4 


TO to 


T5 


80 to 


84 


88 to 


88 


90 to 


94 


88 to 


99 


100 «a 


! « 





57,006 19.US 7C,11S 

8,110 8H 4,104 

4,077 1*881 8,868 

4*308 1,785 €.098 

4,336 1,7W «,043 

8,096 881 4,087 

2,050 738 8,88ft 

8,388 88* 8,889 

1*423 1,141 3,564 

2,320 1,091 8,427 

1.46& 1*181 5,603 

3,045 1,198 4,21* 

4,187 1,309 6,498 

8*837 1,488 8,908 

4*800 1*181 8,888 

5,129 748 S.S77 

2*439 888 8,978 

1*471 880 1,781 

888 81 737 

188 80 188 

41 T 48 

18 • IS 

949 180 1,309 



tiSVt TlJtm fta&or of StoatRlly ^eired Prnvam Supportoa or SUllo***" *» Poor P«r»oa« dartec tte jw 
onSiat SR»h «, 1841* olftooltt*! *y Sestal twftot *aA S*s* # 



sonars tsr asr-isr 



A^ngoto *••••••••«••••••••••••••• 

tote 

>M M J| 

total ••*•••«••.*••••••••••••*• 

......................... 

regal* ••••••••••• • • •••••••• » 

SStolte* 

Tstei »•••*•«•••*••••••••«••••• 

Sfclo 



total 
**• n* 



CittH 




Total 


Ml 


state 


Ten* 








89 


819 


m 


a 


1M 


99 


i? 


SIS 


81 


t 


88 


38 


i 


S 


a 


T 




in 


V 


18? 


88 


T 


78 


83 


9 


71 


84 


4 


38 


19 


• 


a 


» 


1 


a 



'a* Ola kg> iuiituM, Ml to tapmftMS Cailaroa, aajfl 



nam Tin.- Motor of fear Pmrtsm Mmtouv** Aw support or teltaf **i«g *• T«ar otet^ ws-ofc 81, 1941 

ClUeo 

sec®* a? as.isr «• ■ ?ot»i 



*4E*»este ............ ••««••«• Utjm §»H* 

mi* ...... U,sm 5,315 

Ante »,9«8 3,«1 

Te ear* of rotatlvM friet*S»» 

Total M& «.11T 

SM* ......................... *,«S 1.138 

RhOi ......................... S,J8f Mt 

T» atewr itatitatioHH 

Total ••••••••*»••••«•••••••••• *8§ TTt 

<fcl» SM 480 

Panic •.•.••■•..»....••.•»•*••• 887 838 

7* o*r* of *«l?t 

Total ......................... 13,566 M9 1S,T23 

mu 8.5B9 8,3»a 9,sa 

PomO* ......................... 6,78* 1,S98 8.TB1 

riodt 

Total . . • . 1,720 MB 2,202 

Sola ......................... 1,053 Mt 1,585 

......................... 66? 138 908 




tikSLS T£m~ Saafcor of rmt^otit r«w*aj «%» Seoeiw! Ps&Ko 5*liof dsriac Vba To*r «a*U»; R&reh 81* 1S41 
olesslflod fcy CoHBtrias of sirth, 





cm« 








Mf 


State 


ratal 




fans 










S.S7S 


28,830 


"ustoor bora 1st 








i,«*t 


6,9*7 






508 


1,38* 






61 


238 






m 


8,821 






SS9 


5,346 






m 


2,558 




m 


889 






M 


893 






1*086 » 





BBU X«> rmnm**& of too Harlow Clooooo of Psraoat MUml «t P*lio Dagmtm 
RUCUae Bmt* tt» JW, to the isiwl* Swfeor oo B«1Iowj*»* 



solace <v rsLtw 

Total ituH fc u of pornom roll**od «.•••••■•«•«»•••••••••••»•* ft ,13* 

poreostoto* 

loot! ••«•••••.«•••.•••••••«.»«••••••••*• 

etato •*••••••«••••••*•••*••••*•••••••••• 

{tow «T Soiiof* 

Total •••.•••••••••••••»•••••.•••..••«•• 

Isflrmrloo ••••■•••••••••••••••••••••••««• 

OtaOT iB»ti*B«<0» .♦•••»•*».••••»«••••••••••••• T.SO 

Stato lBrtttBttm •«••••••••••••••••••.••••••«• I un 

twa ................................... >«.sr 

MUM ftetfliw •••••**••*••*•••««*••*•••••••• , 8*W 

Qssft hosstt .*•••••**•••..••••••*•*••••••••••• B3.74 

•an 

ut»e •«•••••••«*••«•*•••»«••»•••••.•••••• sa.» 

00 oj»t ooor «*•**#•»**«••«*•*•«*»***»*•*»•»••*• -*a»s* 

• ....................... urn 



•••••«*•••••••••«*««*•••••••*•••**•• E3.34 

Pwste ..•......•••..•.«..•...........••••« «$•«« 

Color* 

W&fcft •••••••••«•••••••••••••••••«•••«•••• t7.Z4 

colon* **•*•*«*••*•*#«*»••**»*••**•*•••••»* «.w 
Moatal Condition* 

SttW • •••...»••...,.........•. .........*..* 99.6? 

laws* .••••.*•••••••••.»•.••••.•••».•••••••* *00 

Xdiotio .......•.•.•.«..«.•••....•...•.*•..•» .19 

s^iloptlo •..*••••.»««•••••••*..••......•••••* .'.)£ 



TABU XXa* »HHPtttl Jtelotlaa to the shoi* J^wUtieB of too sworel Claeiw* of P*rae«* loliovod ct 
Pufcllo 81900*0 <farin£ tho Tear ob&i$ (tons SI, 1941. 



Sh^ulittlos 1940 .................................. 4, 35 fl, 751 

Stater per 1,000 of Pspstetlau 

Of oil fcraoae Kolion4L<. too table 1 . 1)6.20 

oil raraoa* Aral/sod ............................ ST.4S 

Of toloo *.3S 

Of fealoo ••••••*••.•••*•••••••»••»•••••••«•« 6*76 

of sstifo Soro •••••••».•••••••••••••••••**••••• i'^> 

Of roroiza Ban ........*........<•....«...«..•. M* 

or Srtlvo Sara of Toroljpi Ffcrcs£*g» ••••••»«•••••«*•■••••• 3.2? 

Of Ctofoaiiw Birtfc •**•••«*•**•**•»•*** «J9 

Of Tfe&ssts o « • • * * • * * •. ♦ «*»»#» » « * * 9 M0 



"E»lw?ia£ 014 Ago Awittaiwo* AW to r*s*ral«a% Cfell&rw, oat «s«*f>loya»!* 00*00 m km tort. 



tiSUt XI XX.- KM Port to tho State ttf fi^^ortiut aw 
ftad la fMt^W. 



Ordlna^ OKE'OTfl.H iifwi ■»»••». 
In laotltetlwo- 

State Inflmory ....... 

Total, ootel&i iaeMtatlow . , 
Ertre-or^isory «x?sa&terv« an 
uewst of istrtdtuttisw • • • • 



TABLE XI»— Total m Cost of Pfcfclio foot teltef U 
•wSlsg Seroh SI, 1341. 



ss^rcs or asusr cities mm 

totem 

t-£Zr*S**» .....».......•.....•$ S1»&55,S37*C 

Total .......... SMOSfSSM 

& lB*«tati«» S,753,309.S 

Osts td* • . . s*,aov*M 

m>ll« *olf*» jUSainUtrotio* 
Sttreorftnar? espeaditar** ok 

aewrast of tattitettom .......... 1M,343.{ 



Ch&p.398-AN ACT FURTHER REGULATING THE ALLOWANCE OF ACCOUNTS CF 
GUARDIANS AND CONSERVATORS OF IHtlATES OF CERTAIN INSTITUTIONS 
UNDER THE JURISDICTION OF THE DEPARTiArftT OF ^ETiTAL HEALTH, AND 
RELATIVE TO THE COLLECTION OF SU&S DUE FOR THE SUPPORT OF SUCH 
PERSONS. 

Approved June 20,1941 

Chap.402-AN ACT ESTABLlSIil. G A KKRIT SYSTEM, 5UBSTANTIALY SIMILAR 
TO THE CIVIL SKB¥ICT SYSTBi, FOR CERTAIN OFFICERS AND EMPLOYEES 
OF LOCAL BOARDS OF PUBLIC tsJSLFABE, TO BE ADMINISTERED BY THE 
DIVISION OF CIVIL SFRVTCE, AND VALIDATING ACTIO:.' UNDER THE SERIT 
SYSTEM INSTALLED AND ADMINISTERED BY THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC 
WELFARE AT THE INSTANCE OF THE FEDERAL SOCIAL SECURITY BOARD. 
(Sect. 1,5,8) 

Approved June 24, 19-41 

Chap.404-AN ACT RKLATIVH TO VISITATIONS BY THE DlPART*i?;<T OF PUBLIC 
WELFARE 0. CERTAIN PEBSONS RECEIVING PUBLIC AID. 

Approved June 24,1941 

Chap.405-AN ACT CHANGING THE METHOD OF REIiibU RSFM FNT BY THE CO£iON- 
WKaLTK ON ACC OUNT OF AID RENDERED BY CITIES AND TOWNS TO 
DEPENDENT CHILDREN. 

Approved June 24,1941 

Chap.406-AN ACT RELATIVE TO THE DATE OF RBiDSRIHG CERTAIN ACCOUNTS 
I- OR STATE REIMBURSEMENT ON ACCOUNT OF CEPTAIN PU3LIC AID. 

Approved June 24, 1941 

Chap.412-AN ACT AUTHORIZING REIMHJBSEHENT BY THE CO^ONV.E^LT'; FOR 
CARE, IN PRIVATE HOSPITALS, OF CERTAIN SICK POOR PERSONS. 

Approved June 2>,i941 

Chap.523-AN ACT RELATIVE TO FUNDS RECEIVED BY THE COMMISSIONER OF 
PUBLIC WELFARE FOR THE BENEFIT OF PERSONS UNDER THE CARE AND 
SUPERVISION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WELFARE. 

Approved July 24,1941 

Chap.56l-AN ACT EXTENDING TO FORMER PATIENTS OF CG UNTY AND STATE 
HOSPITALS AND SANATORIA THE ADVANTAGES OF CORRESPONDENCE COURSES 
FREE OF CHARGE FOR A CERTAIN ! ERIOD. 

Approved July 30,1941 

Chat>.593-AN ACT TO ENABLE THE DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC TTLFARE TO 

CO-CrERATE SORE FULLY WITH THE FEDERAL GOVERNMENT IN CONNECTION 
WITH THE ADMINISTRATION OF THE LAIVS RELATIVE TO AID TO DEPEKDEHT 
CHILDREN. 

Approved August 2,1941 

Chap.$96-AN ACT TO PROHQTE EQUALITY OF COMPENSATION FOR POSITIONS 
IN THE STATE SERVIBE. 
(Sect. 12,13,25) 

Approved August 2,1-" 41 



10^ 



Chap.597-AH ACT TO FNABLF TB^ DEPART EHT OF PU3LIC VEUARE TO 
CO-OPERATE KORF FULuY 5PITH T>T FEDERAL GOVTRSfelFIiT IH 
CONKECTIOil *ITH TK; ADMINISTRATION OF THF LAWS RELATIVE TO 
OLD AGE ASSISTANCE. 
(Sect. 1,2) 

Approved August 2,1941 

Chap.6l3-AN ACT RTLATIVT- TO TKF DISPOCITIOS OF CFJRTAIB UNCLAIMED 
" O.iTfS iiTLD BY THF DIVISION OF CHILD GUARDIANSHIP FOR THE 
bESEFIT OF CERTAIN &ARDS THEREOF. 

Ap roved August 4,1941 

Chap.629-AH ACT RELATIVE TO THF SUPERVISIQH OF CERTAIB I INFANTS 
IK BOABDIHG "OBSEfi. 

Approved August 4*1941 

Chap.630-Afl ACT TO AlAKl RECORDS RFLATISG TO OLD AG J ASSISaAHCE, 
AID TO DEPLi.'DENT CHILDREN ^ilD AID 10 TEE BLI3D CG riFIDFSIT 1 AL , 
TO PR0HI3IT Zl-X MISUSE OF SUCH RECORDS, To CRliATE A PEBAlTY 
FOR SUCH MISUSE AND TO PROVIDE THAT THE LA*S COKCERHING TBI 
CO x'IDEl.TIAL MATURE OF CUCE RECORDS £A2 EE ?;&r;D?i> 10 APPLY 
TO RECORDS RELATING 10 GI2ISRAI PUBLIC A3SISTA3CE. 

Approved August 21,1941 

CLap.634-Atf ACT AUTHORIZING T.il C0^iISSl03ER OF PUBLIC WELFARE TO 
ACCEPT, FOR RELIEF POPPOSES, SURPLUS AGRICULTURAL COa^ODI'IiHS 
FROy THE SURPLUS MARKETING ADMXiS I STRATI OK OF THF UNITED STATES 
DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE, PROVIDING FOR THE DISTRIBUTION OF 
THE SAME THROUGH TUF STAUP PLAH, ASD PROVIDING FOR THE DISTRI- 
BUTION* OF OTHER C0&S0D1T1ES RECEIVED FRO'i TIT UNITED STATES 
THROUGH SAID AD&IKI STRATIOH . 

Approved October 8,1941 

Chap.646-AN ACT ESTABLISHING THE MASSACHUSETTS BOARD ; ; CF THE 
Phua)TIOl£ OF OPPORTUNITIES FOR YOUNG PEOPLE, 
(^ect.l) 

Approved October 10,1941 
Chap.64S-AH ACT RELATING TO TIT COMKITifENT CF JUVESILF DELINQUENTS 

to jail and the caf.f of chili--; under sevt:;te-r held fOR 

FXA.'JI-ATI )li CP TRIAL. 
(Sect. 3) 

Approved October 10,1%1 

Cha-:.656-AK ACT MAKING CERTAIN CHANGES IN EXISTIJIG 1.AV7S IN 

CCIIIiFCTIOS VITII TET peoposfd cha:tge in Til: FISCAL y~af OF THE 

COMMONWEALTH. 

(Sect. 13, 17) 

Approved October 17,19-41 

Chap.706-AH ACT RELATIVE TO THE TRASSFFR OF THE INSAITE TO AND 
FROM THE WARDS OF THE TFIKSBUR2 STATE HOSPITAL AND I iFIHfiARX 
USFD FOR THEIR CARE. 

Approved October 28,1941 



Ch*p.729-AN ACT ESTABLISHING AN OLD AGE ASSISTANCE FUND AND 

iiAKIiiG CERT All! MISCELLANEOUS CHANGES IN THE OLD AGE 

ASSISTANCE LAW, SO CALLFD. 

(This bill, returned by the Governor to tne 
House of Representatives, the branch in which 
it originated, with his objections thereto, 
was massed ly the House of Representatives, 
October 30, 1941, and, in concurrence, by the 
Senate, October 30, 1941, the objections of 
the Governor notwithstanding, in the manner 
prescribed by the cons ti tut Ion; and thereby 
lias "the force o: a law*.) 



"7 



WALTHAM, MA 02154 
(617) 893-3051